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1  Chess Publishing Openings / 1. d4 d5 2. c4 / Semi-Slav / Re: Marshall Gambit Mainline - Novelty on Move Ten
 on: Yesterday at 22:46:25 
20+ years ago I played 9. ...f6 and worked quite well, but I didn't check it with the latest engines.

2  General / General Chess / Re: Forward Chess - Book Suggestions
 on: Yesterday at 15:47:17 
By the way, Capablanca's most advanced pedagogical work, Fundamentals of Chess, is already available as an e-book from Everyman (Cadogan). But like Alekhine's and Tarrasch's best game collections and Lasker's Manual of Chess, My Chess Career is not available electronically (it doesn't even exist in algebraic notation in English)!

In general, as Lee Roth said, the pre-Fischer classics are absent. ForwardChess's publishers Russel Enterprises and Everyman have published many of these, so they should be ready to go if it's deemed worthwhile to pay for the data entry. I would buy pretty much as many of these works as are offered, even though I have the paper books, and I'm sure there are many players out there like me ready to follow the advice of Shereshevsky, Dvoretsky, Kramnik, et. al. and study the classics--on a train.

3  Chess Publishing Openings / 1. e4 e5 - Non-Spanish / Kings Gambit / Re: C34: King's Gambit: Wagenbach Defence
 on: Yesterday at 12:05:46 
bof wrote yesterday at 09:53:22:
My computer thinks 14 e5 dxe5 15 Na3 is even better than 14 Qc3 etc. When is your book going on sale? I might buy a copy if it's not too pricey. What other bad openings are in it besides the Wagenbach?


Some time this year probably, as and when I've finished it.

And it'll be full of bad openings...

1 e4 e5 2 Bc4 f5
1 e4 e5 2 Nc3 Nc6 3 Bc4 f5
1 e4 e5 2 f4 exf4 3 Bc4 f5
1 e4 e4 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 exd4 4 Nxd4 Qh4
1 e4 e4 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Nc3 Bc5
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Nf6 4 Ng5 d5 5 exd5 b5

and such like Wink

4  Chess Publishing Openings / 1. e4 e5 - Non-Spanish / Kings Gambit / Re: C34: King's Gambit: Wagenbach Defence
 on: Yesterday at 09:53:22 
Jonathan Tait wrote on 09/18/19 at 08:53:56:
10 Bc4 Bxg5 11 hxg5 Qe7 12 0-0 Be6 13 d5 Bc8 14 Qc3 Qe5 15 Qxe5+ dxe5 16 Nc3 is another nice line for White, swapping queens off a piece down!

That's it from me for now though. I'm not going to say any more at the moment, since the Wagenbach forms a chapter in a book I'm writing about disreputable openings for Black (with 1 e4 e5). I do have an idea, but I don't want it refuting before the book is finished Wink


My computer thinks 14 e5 dxe5 15 Na3 is even better than 14 Qc3 etc. When is your book going on sale? I might buy a copy if it's not too pricey. What other bad openings are in it besides the Wagenbach?

5  Chess Publishing Openings / 1. d4 d5 2. c4 / Semi-Slav / Re: Marshall Gambit Mainline - Novelty on Move Ten
 on: Yesterday at 09:15:10 
Interesting, thanks for sharing!

I had a quick look, and it seems quite ok to play this way. I don't see any variations that are better for White than 19. c5

Btw, this has been played in one game it seems (in Chessbase Online database), although between lower rated players. See Erastov-Uskov, Moscow 2020.

6  Chess Publishing Openings / 1. d4 d5 2. c4 / Moved: 'Modern Triangle by Semkov'
 on: Yesterday at 03:22:33 
This Topic has been moved to Semi-Slav by proustiskeen

7  Chess Publishing Openings / 1. d4 d5 2. c4 / Moved: 'Marshall Gambit Mainline - Novelty on Move Ten'
 on: Yesterday at 03:22:09 
This Topic has been moved to Semi-Slav by proustiskeen

8  Chess Publishing Openings / 1. d4 d5 2. c4 / Semi-Slav / Marshall Gambit Mainline - Novelty on Move Ten
 on: Yesterday at 03:07:08 
Hi all,
I have been analysing the Marshall Gambit as part of my planned upcoming Chessable course on the Semi-Slav through the Triangle move order, and Stockfish suggesting a very interesting novelty in the mainline of the Marshall Gambit.
The position under consideration arises after 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c6 4. e4 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Qxd4 7. Bxb4 Qxe4+ 8. Be2 Na6 9. Ba5 b6 10. Qd6. This position is the absolute mainline of the Marshall Gambit which has been reached in literally hundreds of games, which have overwhelmingly continued with the relatively solid 10... Bd7 - alternatives have not fared very well for black. Instead of this Stockfish at low depths recommended the completely new move 10... e5. Strategically this move is very desirable if black can get away with it as it allows black to contest the dark squares and develop the light-squared bishop actively on f5 instead of d7 (this is black's standard scheme of development in the Marshall Gambit which this line with 10. Qd6 is supposed to prevent). The risk black is taking is that by delaying castling and committing to this pawn advance so early white's chances of blowing black away with an early sacrifice on e5 are increased.
I have looked at this for a few hours and am quite interested to hear what other ChessPub members think. My current conclusion is that the best white can do is reach a rook endgame where white's better structure and piece activity allow white to press for a little bit, but where back should hold. Along the way there are some real fireworks.
The critical line continues with 11. Rd1 Bf5 12. Nf3 Ne7 13. Bc3 Nc5! (13... f6?? 14. 0-0! Qxe2 15. Rfe1 Qxc4 16. Nxe5! +-) and then.
A) 14. Rd2 f6 15. 0-0 Kf7 16. Re1 Rhe8! (16... Rhd8? 17. Qxd8 Rxd8 18. Rxd8 Ng6 19. Bxe5! +/-) 17. Nxe5! (pretty much forced, if black is allowed to get the execute the standard plan for free then black is already seriously better) fxe5 18. Bh5+ g6 19. Rxe4 Nxe4 20. Qxe5 Nxc3 21. Qxc3 gxh5 with a murky position where black has a rook, bishop and knight against white's queen and two pawns. LC0 really likes white but Stockfish starts spitting out zeroes. It's the kind of position where I have no real doubt that Stockfish is objectively correct but the LC0 evaluation might be a better indicator of practical chances, so this could be an interesting try (at least OTB) for white.
B) 14. Nxe5 0-0!
B1) 15. Qxe7 Rae8 16. Qg5 f6 17. Qe3 Qxe3 18. fxe3 fxe5 19. 0-0 where white is slightly better but black is surely okay.
B2) 15. f3 Qh4 16. g3 Qh3 17. Qxe7 f6 18. b4 Na4! (18... Rae8 19. Qxa7 Ne6 20. Rd2 fxe5 21. Bxe5 Bg6 22. Qd7 c5 +/- when black doesn't seem to have enough for the piece and two pawns, but this could be investigated further)
B2a) 19. Ba1 is the principled attempt to refute black's sacrifice, but after 19... Qg2 20. Rf1 Qxh2! (20... Rae8 21. Qxa7 Qxh2 22. Qxa4 fxe5 23. Qb3 +/-) 21. g4 Rae8 22. Qxa7 Rxe5 23. Bxe5 Qxe5 24. Qxa4 Qg3+ black can immediately force a draw. There are some deviations along the way but nothing that seems to give any advantage to white.
B2b)19. c5 might be white's best, when 19... Rae8 20. Bc4+ Be6 21. Bxe6 Qxe6 22. Qxe6 Rxe6 23. Rd6 leads to the rook endgame I mentioned earlier. White is still a little bitter but black should hold.
Like most sharp lines I'm sure it would get rather depressing once the routes to these endgames became well known but for the moment I'm really excited about this line. Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

9  Chess Publishing Openings / Flank Openings / Réti / Re: 1.Nf3 f5 2.d3 Nc6
 on: 02/22/20 at 04:54:14 
While we're at it, have there been any games of note in the Krause Dutch, where White is essentially a tempo up on these lines ?

10  General / General Chess / Re: Forward Chess - Book Suggestions
 on: 02/22/20 at 02:16:09 
Domination in 2,545 Endgame Studies by Kasparyan has an excellent reputation as a great endgame book. It is mentioned frequently on the Perpetual Chess Podcast.

I'd like to point out that the version currently in print has terrible diagrams. You can't tell the difference between a bishop and a pawn.  Sad If you could rescue this great book and get it on Forward Chess you would be doing a great service to the community!!

 
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