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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) C01:Making Exchange French more interesting part 1 (Read 5288 times)
JonathanB
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #14 - 03/31/08 at 23:38:57
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Macca wrote on 03/31/08 at 10:02:00:
Thanks for the link Jonathan, excellent website, I'll never be bored at work again !!!


Glad to be of service  Smiley

Actually ... we aim for that 'perhaps should be working' market.


Also, I won on the Black side of an exchange French tonight so Smiley for me.
  

www.streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com  "I don't call you f**k face" - GM Nigel Short.
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #13 - 03/31/08 at 10:02:00
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Thanks for the link Jonathan, excellent website, I'll never be bored at work again !!!
  
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JonathanB
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #12 - 03/27/08 at 23:18:12
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Bogojump wrote on 03/27/08 at 23:09:45:
All in all I recommend to study Korchnois game vs the exchange variation.


If might be so bold ...

http://streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com/2008/02/interesting-french-exchange-iv...
  

www.streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com  "I don't call you f**k face" - GM Nigel Short.
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Bogojump
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #11 - 03/27/08 at 23:09:45
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If white chose an opening like the french exchange it means he gives away the chance to get an opening advantage. When a strong player plays it against me I think for myself :

" Good now show me what you can do,Show me how strong you are and what good opening you choosed to beat me".

The stronger player tend to take more chances the closer to the drawish endgame we get and then I am ready to strike back.


And when I see a weaker player chose it I try to unbalance the opening as much as I can.

All in all I recommend to study Korchnois game vs the exchange variation. He is very creative and a lot of players have played the exchange against him seeking the draw. Most of them have failed.

Purdy in his book  "24 hours opening repertoire" says about the exchange :

"If the white players plays the french exchange like Morphy the black players should play like Alekhine".

Alekhine was also very good to unbalance the exchange variation.
  

"You must lead your opponent into a deep, dark forest, where 2 + 2 = 5 and
  where the path back out is only broad enough for one of you." (((Mikhail Tal)))
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Smyslov_Fan
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #10 - 02/17/08 at 07:51:25
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Willempie,

I usually do just as you suggest and get a rock solid game.  Unfortunately, I was in a must-win situation and decided to go for more than merely solidly equal.  In hindsight, your suggestion may have been best because I could have played on for quite a few moves and tried to beat my opponent in the endgame. 

This was a real learning experience for me.  I hate those!
  
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JonHecht
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #9 - 02/17/08 at 03:51:31
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Well, I just won on the black side in 17 moves... of course, my opponent was 1400. Why do I keep getting paired against low-rated players. It's kind of annoying.  Undecided That's what I get for playing in a tournament with no reserve section.
  
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Willempie
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #8 - 02/15/08 at 08:38:45
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Smyslov_Fan wrote on 02/09/08 at 05:27:28:
I just lost rather embarrasingly to the French Exchange as follows:

1.e4 e6 2. d4  d5  3. exd5 exd5  4. c4 Nf6  5. Nc3  Bb4 6. Bd3  O-O 7. Ne2  c5  8. O-O dxc4 9. Bxc4  cxd4 10. Nxd4 Nc6  11. Nxc6  bxc6 12. Qb3  a5 13. Bg5  Be7 14. Rad1 Qc7 15. Rfe1 Ba6  16. Bxa6  Rxa6  17. Qc4 Ra7  18. Ne4  Nxe4  19. Bxe7 Qxe7  20. Rxe4  Qf6  21. Qc5 Rb7 22. Rde1 g6 23. Re8  Qg7 24. Qxc6  Qxb2  25. Qc5  Rxe8 26. Rxe8+ Kg7 27. g4  Rb5  28. Qf8+ Kf6  29. h4 Qc1+ 30. Kg2  Qc6+ 31. Kh2 Qc7+  32. Kh3  {Black resigns}
1-0

I was definitely lost before 22...g6, and was inferior as early as 11...bxc6?

I have looked up some games, and even though some strong players have played 7...c5 I am now convinced it is not best.

I now prefer 7...Bg4 f3 for Black.  But perhaps Black should be a bit more circumspect and play the much more quiet variation, 5...Be7.

What do you all think?

Why not play the ancient lines with cementing d5 and play dxc4 only when the f1-bishop moves. To me it seems you get a good version of the analogous CK (and many others) isolani positions.
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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DoubledPawns
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #7 - 02/10/08 at 08:32:06
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There is a strategy that you could consider trying against stronger players who play the Exchange. Copy their first 10 or so moves (aside from moves such as c4), and once the opponent makes an inferior move, play a better move! The advantage of this approach is not to try and get a draw, but to gain the psychological advantage as Black. Confident and arrogant players may play overambitiously in an attempt to stop you copying them, while solid players may reply innocuously.

Of course, the limitation to this strategy is that White may well continue to play good moves, including active moves which for some reason you cannot copy. If you change the tempo of the game by no longer copying the opponent once it is no longer favourable to copy their moves, then you could frustrate many of your opponents.

I haven't tried this myself, but it is something to consider as a psychological ploy.

But of course, the best psychological ploy of all is to play good moves for the entire game Wink
  

Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something - Plato
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #6 - 02/09/08 at 14:34:53
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The way I see exchange French is slightly different. My first 3 games with this line (as black) ended as loss for me. I had equal position after opening and may be slightly bettter after that. But I just could not play the equal ending accurately and intelligently. So I started learning endgames. Realized how my oppononets (all were stronger than me) won those equal positions. Now I feel, I do not need any interesting position (if I get it not bad though), I will be able to outplay my weaker opponents in the endgame. And stronger opponents , I won't mind a draw.

Souvik
  
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #5 - 02/09/08 at 06:50:54
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Doesn't look so bad; I think Al Bundy would say, "Walk it off."

I tend to share your skepticism about 7...c5 (and perhaps 5...Bb4).  Looking at ECO/NCO there seems to be a shift from 7...c5 to 7...dc (as in Waitzkin-Levitt 1994) as the preferred move; that however seems to give White more or less what he is aiming for, a reversed Tarrasch French with enhanced control of d5.
  
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #4 - 02/09/08 at 05:27:28
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I just lost rather embarrasingly to the French Exchange as follows:

1.e4 e6 2. d4  d5  3. exd5 exd5  4. c4 Nf6  5. Nc3  Bb4 6. Bd3  O-O 7. Ne2  c5  8. O-O dxc4 9. Bxc4  cxd4 10. Nxd4 Nc6  11. Nxc6  bxc6 12. Qb3  a5 13. Bg5  Be7 14. Rad1 Qc7 15. Rfe1 Ba6  16. Bxa6  Rxa6  17. Qc4 Ra7  18. Ne4  Nxe4  19. Bxe7 Qxe7  20. Rxe4  Qf6  21. Qc5 Rb7 22. Rde1 g6 23. Re8  Qg7 24. Qxc6  Qxb2  25. Qc5  Rxe8 26. Rxe8+ Kg7 27. g4  Rb5  28. Qf8+ Kf6  29. h4 Qc1+ 30. Kg2  Qc6+ 31. Kh2 Qc7+  32. Kh3  {Black resigns}
1-0

I was definitely lost before 22...g6, and was inferior as early as 11...bxc6?

I have looked up some games, and even though some strong players have played 7...c5 I am now convinced it is not best.

I now prefer 7...Bg4 f3 for Black.  But perhaps Black should be a bit more circumspect and play the much more quiet variation, 5...Be7.

What do you all think?
  
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting part 1
Reply #3 - 02/07/08 at 14:51:07
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Raspje wrote on 11/30/07 at 16:23:38:
The EF has a dull reputation. But black can make things more interesting. Take for instance this pawn sacrifice:

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3 Bg4!? 5.h3 Bh5 6.Qe2+ (Kasparov) and now 6...Be7!?/?!. Every commentator thinks this is dubious; are they right?

7.Qb5+ Nd7 8.Qxd5 (8.Qxb7 is the same thing after ...Bxf3 9.gxf3 Ngf6 but then only 1 pawn has been sacrificed; 8.g4!?) Ngf6 9.Qb3!? (seems best; 9.Qxb7 Rb8 10.Qxa7 Bxf3 11.gxf3 0-0 with complications) c5 10.Be2 0-0 11.0-0 Bxf3 12.Bxf3 cxd4 += it seems to me.

But it is great stuff to try in your games. Certainly in blitz/rapidgames. On ICC I have won quite some games with it against IM's. Almost everyone takes the pawns on d5, b7 and a7 when black has some compensation (although I think not sufficient).


speaking of pawn scarifices in the exchange heres one i started playing in blitz some years ago.

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.ed Nf6?!

My idea comes from fellow gambit player tim mcgrew its similar to a gambit like in the philidor. Not 100% sound but 100% fun to play in blitz games.
  
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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting pa
Reply #2 - 12/01/07 at 11:49:56
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I don't want to start an endless fight vs gambit players but after 6...Ne7!? (or 6...Be7), main idea is not to grab a pawn with Qb5+ but to play 7.g4 (Kasparov idea according to Watson) Bg6 8.Ne5 (Kasparov and MCO) and now Watson gives 8...Nbc6!?

Another "quiet" line for White is: 7.Nc3 Nc6 8.g4 Bg6 9.Bf4 h5 (Bareev-Short, Paris 1991) 10.Rg1 hxg4 11.hxg4 Qd7 12.ooo f6

Maybe 6..Be7 is better than 6..Ne7 (advantage is Black get the e4 square for the g8 knight), but what line is the good line for Black after 7.g4 (better to play g4 here than at next move) Bg6 8.Qb5+ Nd7 9.Qxb7  ?
  

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Re: Making the Exchange French more interesting pa
Reply #1 - 11/30/07 at 16:50:44
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I played a similar idea OTB once: 1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.ed ed 4.Nf3 Bg4 5.h3 Bh5 6. Qe2+ and now 6.Ne7. My opponent played 7.Qb5+, but he got nothing after 7..Nbc6 8.Ne5!? f6.  6.Ne7 still seems playable. Taking on b7 is just bad for white.
  

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Raspje
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C01:Making Exchange French more interesting part 1
11/30/07 at 16:23:38
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The EF has a dull reputation. But black can make things more interesting. Take for instance this pawn sacrifice:

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 4.Nf3 Bg4!? 5.h3 Bh5 6.Qe2+ (Kasparov) and now 6...Be7!?/?!. Every commentator thinks this is dubious; are they right?

7.Qb5+ Nd7 8.Qxd5 (8.Qxb7 is the same thing after ...Bxf3 9.gxf3 Ngf6 but then only 1 pawn has been sacrificed; 8.g4!?) Ngf6 9.Qb3!? (seems best; 9.Qxb7 Rb8 10.Qxa7 Bxf3 11.gxf3 0-0 with complications) c5 10.Be2 0-0 11.0-0 Bxf3 12.Bxf3 cxd4 += it seems to me.

But it is great stuff to try in your games. Certainly in blitz/rapidgames. On ICC I have won quite some games with it against IM's. Almost everyone takes the pawns on d5, b7 and a7 when black has some compensation (although I think not sufficient).
« Last Edit: 07/29/11 at 19:21:31 by dom »  
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