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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit (Read 98415 times)
Stefan Buecker
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #106 - 02/19/14 at 16:53:44
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PANFR wrote on 02/19/14 at 12:14:23:
No, factly he doesn't mention the move at all.
I had a brief look at 9.d4 sometime ago, and I concluded that it' equal- but I did not attempt any serious analysis, and the existing games on it (I have 25 of them, mostly from correspondence chess, although with little involvement of really good correspondence players) suggest that a draw is the most likely outcome.
If interested, I can give you the related games- mostly ICCF/ IECG/LSS stuff from average. or less than average engine users.

Thanks. Yes, I'd be interested in those corr-games. Please e-mail me a pgn file, if possible (redaktion@kaissiber.de). - I agree that White doesn't have much. But the result in Kaissiber tells us that there are many options for White, which can be tried and explored over the board. For example 9.Nd5 Qg6 10.d3 Qg3+ 11.Kd2 Nb4 12.Kc3 (Maurits Wind). In corr chess it will probably lead to a draw, but not more. And Black can certainly go wrong. So this opening looks very much like any other opening.
  
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TalJechin
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #105 - 02/19/14 at 16:30:00
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Thanks Stefan! I'll have a look at your 11.Qd2N in a few days.

Nice to see some new ideas for White at last! Smiley
  
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PANFR
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #104 - 02/19/14 at 12:14:23
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Stefan Buecker wrote on 02/19/14 at 11:57:01:
PANFR wrote on 02/19/14 at 11:52:43:
I was not aware of the Kaissiber article, since I have never subscribed to it- I just have quite a few of your books/ pamphlets published in the 80s-90s, when I was playing more regularly.
I noticed this flaw when reading Sakaev's Petroff book, dealing with the same variation, and also concluding that the position is a forced draw- apparently wrongly.
Yet, the mainline in Sakaev's book is equal, although Black has all the fun there is in the position (IMHO not much, just a very,very slight positional edge, which is extremely hard to materialize).

Thanks for the hint, so it seems I have to buy the Sakaev book. Does he cover the strongest move 9.d4? This is a line where I'd really prefer to be White.


No, factly he doesn't mention the move at all.
I had a brief look at 9.d4 sometime ago, and I concluded that it' equal- but I did not attempt any serious analysis, and the existing games on it (I have 25 of them, mostly from correspondence chess, although with little involvement of really good correspondence players) suggest that a draw is the most likely outcome.
If interested, I can give you the related games- mostly ICCF/ IECG/LSS stuff from average. or less than average engine users.
  
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Stefan Buecker
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #103 - 02/19/14 at 11:57:01
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PANFR wrote on 02/19/14 at 11:52:43:
I was not aware of the Kaissiber article, since I have never subscribed to it- I just have quite a few of your books/ pamphlets published in the 80s-90s, when I was playing more regularly.
I noticed this flaw when reading Sakaev's Petroff book, dealing with the same variation, and also concluding that the position is a forced draw- apparently wrongly.
Yet, the mainline in Sakaev's book is equal, although Black has all the fun there is in the position (IMHO not much, just a very,very slight positional edge, which is extremely hard to materialize).

Thanks for the hint, so it seems I have to buy the Sakaev book. Does he cover the strongest move 9.d4? This is a line where I'd really prefer to be White.
  
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PANFR
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #102 - 02/19/14 at 11:52:43
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I was not aware of the Kaissiber article, since I have never subscribed to it- I just have quite a few of your books/ pamphlets published in the 80s-90s, when I was playing more regularly.
I noticed this flaw when reading Sakaev's Petroff book, dealing with the same variation, and also concluding that the position is a forced draw- apparently wrongly.
Yet, the mainline in Sakaev's book is equal, although Black has all the fun there is in the position (IMHO not much, just a very,very slight positional edge, which is extremely hard to materialize).
Regarding the Bishop's gambit, I am still quite satisfied as Black with 3...d5! - also equal, but Black has all the fun (again).
The Nc3 lines in Shaw's book are very interesting, but they are also borderline refutable- which means I have not found any refutation, but I do think Black should have something against them.
  
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Stefan Buecker
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #101 - 02/19/14 at 11:39:42
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TalJechin wrote on 07/27/13 at 09:49:59:
As for 3...Nc6 I thought White's activity would compensate for the extra pawn islands. Though nowadays Black seems to score a huge percent in this variation - although a couple of corr games still seem like a road to rough equality, but nowadays White seems to be the one avoiding these, maybe for a reason...?



Your analysis in The Fascinating King's Gambit still holds in my opinion. But instead of 11.Ng3?, White should play 11.Qd2! intending 11...0-0 12.Qg5. When the queens are exchanged, there is not the slightest reason why Black's fewer pawn islands should be a factor. White's center may well be more important. A refutation of the King's Bishop Gambit this Black line is certainly not.
  
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Stefan Buecker
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #100 - 02/19/14 at 11:25:11
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PANFR wrote on 11/09/13 at 01:13:45:
1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. h4 g4 5. Ne5 d6 6. Nxg4 Nf6 7. Nxf6+ Qxf6 8. Nc3 Nc6 9. Nd5 Qg6 10. d3 Nb4 11. Nxc7+ Kd8 12. Nxa8 Qg3+ 13. Kd2 Qe3+ 14. Kc3 Qc5+ 15. Kd2

He mentions this position as equal, while the truth is that white is in deep trouble after 15...Rg8 (most probably losing by force). [...]

You are right. Same error in Kaissiber #32 (2008), p. 36: "12. Nc7+ Kd8 13.Nxa8 Qe3+ ist sofort Remis." After your recommendation 15...Rg8, a modern engine like Stockfish DD has no trouble finding 16.c4 Rg3 17.Ke1 Bg4 18.d4 Qc6 19.Qd2 Qxe4+ 20.Kf2 Nd3+ 21.Kg1 Ne1! 22.Kh2 Bg7! -+ and the myriad of other complex tactical variations necessary to force a win for Black.

Kaissiber #32 appeared in 2008, the engine used for the analysis was Rybka 2.3.2a, run on my old Pentium PC. Still, I think a human should indeed understand that Black is better in spite of the fact that he is a rook behind. So yes, mea culpa. Shaw has just quoted older analysis, without crediting.

A better excuse is that 12. Nxc7+ was "at least" a draw, so it was obviously worse than 12.Qf3 which I looked at in more detail. By the way: the recommended main line in Kais. 32 was Maurits Wind's idea 12. Kc3!?, a move ignored by Shaw. And, not to forget, Kaissiber #32 advised against 9. Nd5. Our choice was 9.d4!. - On p. 114 of his work John Shaw writes:

Quote:
This line [9.d4] could be dubbed the Bücker variation as the German analyst has published a lot of analysis about it. I believe the man himself called it the "Triumphlager" variation, but I can't see that catching on.

Shaw is wrong, I never proposed such a name for 9.d4. The article published in Kais. 32 was titled "Am Triumphlager des Königsgambits", using a term coined by Tartakower: he joked that Spielmann's article "Am Krankenlager des Königsgambits" would have better been titled "Triumphlager", because Spielmann presented mainly his wins with the gambit.
  
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #99 - 11/09/13 at 01:13:45
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1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. h4 g4 5. Ne5 d6 6. Nxg4 Nf6 7. Nxf6+ Qxf6 8.
Nc3 Nc6 9. Nd5 Qg6 10. d3 Nb4 11. Nxc7+ Kd8 12. Nxa8 Qg3+ 13. Kd2 Qe3+ 14. Kc3
Qc5+ 15. Kd2

He mentions this position as equal, while the truth is that white is in deep trouble after 15...Rg8 (most probably losing by force).

Typical case of an engine misjudgement, I guess there are more like that in the book.

In any case, my most sincere respect to the author of the book, for spending so much effort and energy to such a sub-par opening.
  
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #98 - 09/27/13 at 15:02:23
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Smiley ooops. my sincere apologies. wow, that was embarrasing...
  
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #97 - 09/27/13 at 06:23:34
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And he is named 'Smerdon'.
With no extra vowels.
  
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #96 - 09/27/13 at 06:22:20
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Schwebbz wrote on 09/27/13 at 04:38:23:
Smeardon also says the Adelaide isn't covered. It is, on pages 645-653. Not hard to find at all, it's right there in the variation index. The chapter title 'second move alternatives' is also a clue. It seems to me Smeardon is blaming Shaw for his own reading difficulties.

Good grief.
Idiot. Rude idiot.
"Of course, I think it’s a shame that the Australian connection is left out, but it’s nice to see the line getting some reasonable coverage as it is certainly far better than first meets the eye."

I blame you for your own reading difficulties.

It is there, but not named such.

Oh, irony, smite this contributor in the face with a hot iron.
  
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #95 - 09/26/13 at 03:35:09
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I happen to own Who's afraid of the King's Gambit, but as I only recently came home from a holiday in The Netherlands I only now can comment.



looks a bit better for White to me.
So this is not what puts me off. Shaw's treatment of 6...Nf6 is.
I took the time to brows through Shaw's book. It looks very, very good. The only reason I didn't buy it is that it just confirms the conclusions I arrived at five years ago or more:

1. White has nothing, not even imbalanced equality after 5...d6 and 6...Nf6 in the Kieseritzky.
2. If White plays g2-g3 in the Hanstein Black typically should reply with Alapin's ...Bh3.
3. The plan with Qa4 and b4 in the Hanstein is not promising either, despite FM Bücker's laudible efforts.
4. So what remains is the Quaade Gambit 4.Nc3.
5. Black's best against the Bishop's Gambit is 3...Nc6.

I rather disagree with GM's Smerdon's review. From glancing it immediately became clear to me that Shaw actually doesn't recommend the Kieseritzky, but rather the Quaade.
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #94 - 09/25/13 at 14:20:53
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TalJechin
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #93 - 09/03/13 at 15:51:45
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Schwebbz wrote on 09/03/13 at 15:28:34:
That would depend on what your standards for 'juicy' is. The coverage isn't extensive: He annotates Schlecter-Teichmann, Vienna 1903. Seven novelties in the annotations. He quotes you twice, too. A little over 4 pages total. Looks good to me, though I haven't gotten around to examining the game in detail yet.


Thanks, good to know!

It is a bit surprising that he doesn't give 6...Be7 for Black in the Kieseritzky, but I'd assume that he doesn't recommend it for White and thus doesn't want to get bogged down with every equalising line for Black.

But if the book is intended for both sides, then I'd imagine that 6...Be7 could offer Black better chances for the full point than 6...Nf6 - but it's at least a decade since I looked at the Kieseritzky so there might no longer be a need for another alternative for Black...
  
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Re: C30-C39: John Shaw: The King's Gambit
Reply #92 - 09/03/13 at 15:28:34
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That would depend on what your standards for 'juicy' is. The coverage isn't extensive: He annotates Schlecter-Teichmann, Vienna 1903. Seven novelties in the annotations. He quotes you twice, too. A little over 4 pages total. Looks good to me, though I haven't gotten around to examining the game in detail yet.
  
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