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Poll closed Question: Vote for the novelty with the highest practical value!
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12...a5 (reply #1, #3) by gewgaw    
  1 (8.3%)
13...Ng6 (reply #10) by Luzin/Ametanoitos    
  3 (25.0%)
13.Qh5 (reply #12, #13) by CaptainFuture    
  7 (58.3%)
11...0-0-0 refuted (reply #14) by CraigEvans    
  1 (8.3%)




Total votes: 12
« Created by: Stefan Buecker on: 08/13/09 at 08:41:06 »
Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) C54: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack (Read 25459 times)
ArKheiN
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #18 - 08/25/09 at 07:03:03
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Congratulation for the winners and... thank you very much for my prize, I didn't expect to receive anything! I am happy that my hint was useful for the theory.

I hope there will be others competitions like this Smiley
  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #17 - 08/25/09 at 01:06:29
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Winner of the Second Kaissiber Competition: CaptainFuture

Congratulations to CaptainFuture, the clear winner of our second theoretical competition (and of a full set of Kaissiber), and to the winners of the other prizes Ametanoitos, Luzin, gewgaw and CraigEvans for their excellent ideas, which in my opinion all contribute significantly to the young theory of 7.Nbd2. The special prize for the best research, consisting of ten issues of Kaissiber, goes to ArKheiN for his valuable hint which uncovered a transposition to 7.Bd2 theory, in reply #69 in the chat thread. They will soon receive a personal message from me, asking for their mail addresses.
Some remarks on the four nominated ideas will follow later. The number of votes (12) could have been higher, but probably many members preferred to spend the summer with other activities.
  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #16 - 08/18/09 at 14:50:35
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Members, please vote! This poll ends in six days, on August 24th. - For those who haven't voted yet, a short overview on the ideas, in the order of their nomination:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2:

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(A) 7...Bxd2+ 8.Bxd2 Nxe4 9.d5 Ne7 10.Bb4 d6 11.0–0 0–0 12.Re1 "comp." 12...a5. Nominated by gewgaw, as equalizing, in reply #3.

(B) 7...Nxe4 8.d5 Ne7 9.0-0 Nxd2 10.Nxd2 0-0 11.a3 Bxd2 12.Bxd2 d6 13.Re1 "comp." 13...Ng6. Nominated by Luzin/Ametanoitos, as promising for Black, in reply #10.

(C) 7...Nxe4 8.d5 Ne7 9.0-0 Nxd2 10.Bxd2 Bxd2 11.d6 Bb4 12. Ng5 cxd6 "=" 13. Qh5. Nominated by CaptainFuture, as refuting 11...Bb4, in replies #12 and #13.

(D) 7...d5 8.exd5 Qe7+ 9.Kf1 Na5 10.Qa4+ Bd7 11.Bb5 0-0-0 "+=". CraigEvans nominated an analysis leading to +/-, starting with 12.Bxd7+ Rxd7 13.a3, in reply #14.

  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #15 - 08/13/09 at 08:41:06
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Dear members, please vote! This poll ends on August 24th.
(Remark: The nominated 11.Re1 in reply #5 was later withdrawn and replaced by CaptainFuture's new nomination.)
  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #14 - 08/12/09 at 13:09:49
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Nomination #4 - The Intermittent 8...Qe7+ Variation - Refutation of 11...O-O-O

As always, my eyes were immediately distracted by the sight of a lesser-known gambit idea mentioned by Stefan, namely (from the stem position) 7...d5 8.exd5 Qe7+. It was my original plan to show that this move gives black better chances than the old 8...Nxd5 9.O-O O-O 10.a3 Be7 after CaptainFuture's suggested 11.Re1 (a move I had independently found but had not gotten around to fully analysing in time to beat his original nomination!) - which indeed gives black a few problems to solve.

I have little to add on 9.Qe2 Qxe2= - black has already equalised comfortably. Therefore critical is the main move 9.Kf1 Na5 10.Qa4+ Bd7 11.Bb5 and now O-O-O is the move I considered for black. Although he has 'sacrificed' a pawn temporarily, the pawn on d5 will be unkeepable in the long run, and white's piece coordination is far from optimal. There are several factors to consider for this:

1) The Nbd2, which looks so awkward but often leaps into a good square in the gambit accepted lines, really is in the way here. White will most likely want to play a3 and b4, but he needs some time for this, and until then his queenside will be asleep. Meanwhile black is already fully developed, and is ready to begin active operations.
2) White is already forced to exchange light-squared bishops. The Bc4 is often white's strongest piece in these lines, and the exchange can only help black. Further, once black wins (and it is when, not if) the d5 pawn, he has a natural blockade of the isolated d4 pawn, and the Bc4 being absent means there is one less piece to challenge this.
3) White's misplaced king risks being caught up in an attack down the open central files and, even if it remains safe, spoils the coordination of white's rooks.

Therefore, black will look to use these factors to help him in the long-run after dissipating white's initiative, perhaps getting into a better endgame. Meanwhile white will try to get some queenside initiative.

As said above, I believe 12.Bxd7+ Rxd7 13.a3 to be white's only viable continuation, as all alternatives lead to a comfortable advantage for black:

a) 12.a3 Bxb5+ 13.Qxb5 Bxd2 14.Bxd2 Rxd5 15.Qd3 Nc6 and white is left with a bad bishop against good knight, and a rotten pawn on d4 which black is already getting ready to pulverise. Black is already slightly better at least. 15...Qe4 could in fact be more accurate again, exchanging the queens off and removing one protector of d4 - the other knight can travel e4-d6-f5 to add further pressure. I'm not a strong enough player to judge what the best continuation is, but I'm strong enough to know I'd rather be black!
b) White can try to get rid of the weakling on d5 immediately with 12.d6, but a similar scenario to above arises after 12...Qxd6 13.Bxd7+ Rxd7 14.a3 Bxd2 15.Bxd2 Nc6 and again black has the better game.

So, after 12.Bxd7+ Rxd7 13.a3, black uses the inconvenient position of the white king to gain a tempo back with 13...Re8! (14.axb4?? Qe2+ 15.Kg1 Ng4! -+) and and it seems that he has a draw already secured - 14.h3 is pretty much forced to protect against the threat of Ng4, but black then has 14...Qe2+ 15.Kg1 Bxd2 16.Bxd2 Ne4 17.Bxa5 Qxf2+ =.

However, white can try 17.Be3, and suddenly the tactics start to run out and the position quickly turns. 17...Qxb2 (17...b6 18.Ne5 Nc5 19.Qb4 Rxd5 20.Re1 Qh5 21.Qb5 also wins an exchange) 18.Kh2 b6 (18...Qb6 19.Ne5! Ree7 20.Rhc1! +/- sees white suddenly get a strong attack, with black's knight still on the silly a5 square) 19.Rab1 Qa2 20.Ne5! and now black's best chance appears to be to sacrifice the exchange with 20...Rxe5 21.dxe5 Nc3 22.Ra1 Qxd5 23.Qf4 +/= - the computer is trying to tell me that this is equalish, but it is clear that the extra material should win out eventually.

If instead black tries to cling onto his material with 20...Rdd8, 21.Rhc1! and black is in a world of pain, e.g. 21...Qxd5 22.Rb5 Qb7 23.Nxf7 and white retains both a huge attack and a material edge.

Therefore, despite my original hypothesis that 11...O-O-O should give black good play, it would appear that in the main line 12.Bxd7 Rxd7 13.a3! Re8! 14.h3 that white can force a substantial advantage by allowing the tactical line with 14...Qe2+ 15.Kg1 Bxd2 16.Bxd2 Ne4 17.Be3. Hopefully I have showed that neither side has any reasonable alternatives to the main line as far as this, and that white's position becomes swiftly advantageous after this point. Therefore the only question that remains is whether 11...c6 offers black reasonable chances. The evaluation of 11...O-O-O is not so much a question of =/+, = or +/=, but +/- or +-.

This concludes my nomination.

Regards,
Craig
  

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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #13 - 08/12/09 at 11:26:36
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Hello,

i have found an improvement in the last line.

After 11... cxd6 12. Qxd2

A) 12.... O-O  13. Rad1 d5 14. Bxd5 Nxd5 15. Qxd5 is the only chance for black, because ...

B) 12.... d5 13. Bxd5 Nxd5 now White has the stunning 14. Rfe1+!! Ne7 15. Rxe7+!!

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15.... Kxe7 16. Qg5+! f6 17. Qxg7+ Kd6 18. Nd4! and my analysis proves (but the variations are complicated, so please check it!), that Black is lost again.

In short form:

B1) 18.... Rg8 19. Qf7! Qf8 20. Nb5+ Kc5 21. Rc1+ Kb6 22. Qb3 a5 23. Rd1 with advantage

B2) 18.... Re8 19. Qg3+ Re5 20. Qa3+! Rc5 21. Rd1! b6 22. b4! Rd5 23. Nb5+ +-

B3) 18.... Qf8 19. Qg3+! Ke7 20. Nf5+ (Also winning is 20. Nb5 d6 21. Re1+ Kd8 22. Nxd6 Rg8 23. Qd3 +-) Ke8 21. Re1+ Kd8 22. Rc1 Qb4 23. Qc7+ Ke8 23. Rc3 Kf7 24. Qg3 +-

You can find the detailed analysis of these variations and all of my above nomination after 10. Bxd2 in the attached file.


Kind Regards,

Robert
  

Pomtow_Bd2.pgn ( 3 KB | 147 Downloads )
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #12 - 08/11/09 at 20:01:11
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Hello,

because i've discovered a wonderful decisive attack, that in my opinion solves Whites problems, i would like to make another nomination.
I know that i've made one nomination yet, so if one person could only make one nomination, this should be the one!

At the moment all hairs of my body are raising Smiley so please excuse me, but i am too happy about my discovery Wink

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. cxd4 Bb4+ 7. Nbd2 Nxe4 8. d5 Ne7 9. O-O Nxd2

And here was analysed 10. Nxd2 as in the nomination #3. But i believe in the move ...

10. Bxd2! Bxd2 11. d6 Bb4

(Stefan Bücker recommended 11... Bb4 as "less risky" than 11...cxd6. Beyond you see my comment to 11....cxd6)

12. Ng5! cxd6

And now my nomination

13. Qh5!!

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instead of 13. Nxf7 Qc7 14. Qb3 d5 15. Bxd5 Rf8 16. Qxb4 Nxd5 17. Nd6+ Kd8 18. Nxb7+ Ke8 19. Nd6+ Kd8 = Bücker

13... Qa5 forced

(13... g6 14. Bxf7+ Kf8 15. Qh6# or
13... Rf8 14. Bxf7+ Rxf7 15. Qxf7# or
13... Qb6 14. Qxf7+ Kd8 15. Qxg7 Re8 16. Bf7)

14. Qxf7+ Kd8 15. Qxg7 Re8

(15... Kc7 16. Qxe7 Qe5 17. Qxe5 dxe5 18. Rfd1 +-)

16. Rad1!!

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After this move the black position is lost in all variations:

A) 16... Nc6 17. a3 (clearer than 17. Nf7+ Kc7 18. a3 Bc5 19. Qg3 Kb8 20. b4 Nxb4 21. Nxd6 (21. axb4 Bxb4 22. Nxd6 Bxd6 23. Qxd6+ Qc7) 21... Bxd6 22. Qxd6+ Qc7 23. Qxb4 Re4) 17... Bc5 18. b4 Nxb4 19. axb4 Qxb4 20. Rc1 b5 21. Nf7+ Kc7 22. Bd5 Rb8 (22... Kb8 23. Qg3) 23. Nxd6 Kxd6 24. Bf7 Re2 25. Qg3+ Ke7 26. Bh5 +-

B) 16... d5 17. a3

B1) 17... dxc4 18. Ne6# a very nice mate
B2) 17... Rg8 18. Nf7+ Ke8 19. Qxh7 dxc4 20. axb4 +-
B3) 17... Bd2 18. Nf7+ Kc7 19. Qe5+ Kb6 20. Nd6 +-
B4) 17... Bd6 18. Nf7+ +-
B5) 17... Bc5 18. b4 +-

C) 16... Nf5 17. Qf6+ Kc7 18. Rd5 +-

D) 16... h6 17. Nf7+ Kc7 18. a3 +-

E) So the toughest continuation is 16... Kc7 17. a3 Bd2 (17... Bc5 18. b4) 18. Nf3 b5 (18... Nf5 19. Qf7 Re7 20. Qf6) 19. Bf7! (Also possible is 19. Be2 or 19. Nxe2) 19... Bb7 20. Bxe8 Rxe8 (20... Bxf3 21. Qxe7) 21. Qd4 Rg8 (21... Bxf3 22. gxf3) 22. Kh1 Bg5 23. Qxd6+ Kc8 24. Qxd7+ Kb8 25. Rfe1 Bxf3 26. gxf3 +-

So we see, that 11.... Bb4 is refuted by the above continuation 13. Qh5!! in conjunction with 16. Rad1!!

Now, to make my analysis of 10. Bxd2! round, i add my variations after 11.... cxd6:

11... cxd6 12. Qxd2

A) 12.... O-O  13. Rad1 (13. Qxd6 Nf5 14. Qd3 Qf6 15. Rac1 d6 16. Bd5 Be6) 13... d5 (13... Nf5 14. Rfe1 Re8 15. Qf4 Nh6 16. Rxe8+ Qxe8 17. Re1 Qf8 18. Ng5) 14. Bxd5 Nxd5 15. Qxd5 is the same as in variation B

B) 12... d5 13. Bxd5 Nxd5 14. Qxd5 O-O 15. Rad1 Qf6 16. b3 d6 (16... Re8 17. Rfe1 Rxe1+ 18. Rxe1 h6 19. Re8+ Kh7 20. h3 d6 21. Qd4 Qxd4 22. Nxd4 b6 23. Nb5 Bb7 24. Rxa8 Bxa8 25. Nxd6 Kg6 26. Nc8) 17. Rfe1 Rd8 18. h3 += Yes, White is a pawn down here, but the black position is cramped. Rybka assesses this as +0.1. Not much that's true, but it indicates that 10. Bxd2 may be better (in my opinion) than 10. Nxd2.

Best Wishes!
Robert
  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #11 - 08/11/09 at 16:28:13
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So now we have three nominations: by gewgaw, CaptainFuture and Ametanoitos/Luzin. Fine! But since there are four prizes, I'd be even happier if someone would publish and nominate a fourth idea. This competition ends on 12th of August, i. e. in about 30 hours. More than enough time for the creative members in this forum!
  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #10 - 08/10/09 at 10:35:12
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Ok people, this is a nomination for the Second Kaissiber Competition.

Our thesis is that in the Pomtow Attack, black can safely grab the pawn and claim the better game! Of course, white does have some compensation for the pawn, but his compensation does not seem to justify the pawn sacrifice after black employs our recommended set up. It is of considerable practical interest, that white's initiative does not have real targets and in most cases is actually of a defensive nature, the most white can do in this position, is trying to prevent black from making use of his extra pawn by advancing his central pawns! Therefore,it is much easier to play black's position, since he only has to develop his pieces in a standard fashion that will be explained later, while white has to constantly worry about ending with a pawn down and no compensation at all!

The position is however rich in possibilities and we do not claim to have exhausted all of them, but we do hope that our analysis will give a good idea about black's very promising chances after 7.Nbd2.

The Pomtow Attack (Italian Game) [C54]
[Ametanoitos/Luzin]

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4  Bb4+ 7.Nbd2 Nxe4 8.d5 Ne7 9.0-0 Nxd2 10.Nxd2 0-0 11.a3
looks like it is the best moment to force the bishop into making a decision for his future!

a) 11.Ne4  trying to force the 11.a3 Bc5 12. Ne4 d6 variation does not work:
11…d6 12.a3 Ba5 13.b4 Bb6 14.Bb2 Ng6 and with the B on b6 white cannot press the black queenside.

b) 11.Nb3 Ng6

b1) 12.f4 Qf6 13.Be3 b6 (13...Qxb2 14.Bd4 Bc3 15.Bc5 d6 (15...Re8 16.d6 b6 17.Qd5 Bb7+/-) 16.Rf2 Qxa1 17.Nxa1 dxc5 18.Nb3 Re8 19.Rf1 Bf5 (19...b6 20.d6 cxd6 21.Qf3) 20.Nxc5 Rab8 21.d6 cxd6 22.Bxf7+ Kxf7 23.Qd5+ Ke7 24.Nxb7) 14.Bd4 (14.a3 Bd6 15.g3 Bb7 16.Nd4 Rae8 17.Qf3 Bc5 18.Rad1 Rxe3 19.Qxe3 Ne7 20.g4 Bxd5 21.Bxd5 Nxd5 22.Qe4 c6 23.Kh1 Qd8 24.Nf5 Re8 25.Qd3 Qc7-/+; 14.Qd4 Qxd4 15.Bxd4 Re8 16.a3 Bd6 17.g3 Bb7-/+) 14...Qf5 15.Qf3 Bd6 16.g3 (16.Be3 Qc2 17.Rfc1 (17.Rac1 Qxb2 18.Nd4 Bc5 19.Rb1 Qa3 20.Rb3 Qxa2 21.Rf2 Qa5 22.Rb5 Qc3) 17...Qxb2 18.Bd4 Qa3 19.Qc3 (19.Rc2 Nxf4 20.Bb2 Qa4) 19...f6) 16...Bb7 17.Rae1 (17.Rf2 Rfe8 18.Bc3; 17.Bc3 Ne7) 17...Rae8 18.Bc3 a5 19.a3-/+;

b2) 12.a3 Be7 (12...Bd6 13.Nd4 Qf6 14.b4 a5 15.Bb2 axb4 16.axb4 Rxa1 17.Bxa1 (17.Qxa1 Nf4 18.g3 (18.Nf3 Qg6 19.g3 Qe4) 18...Be5 19.gxf4 Qxf4 20.Re1 d6) 17...b6 (17...Bxb4 18.Ne6) 18.g3 Qg5 (18...Ne5 19.Be2 Re8 20.f4 Ng6 21.Ne6 Qe7 22.Nxg7 Qxe2 23.Nxe8 Qxe8 24.Re1 (24.Qd4 Qf8) 24...Qf8 25.f5 Bxb4 26.fxg6 fxg6 (26...Bxe1 27.gxh7+ Kxh7 28.Qh5+ Qh6 29.Qxf7+ Qg7 30.Qxg7#) 27.Re3 (27.Rf1 Qc5+ 28.Kg2 Bb7) 27...Bc5 28.Bd4 Bb7 29.Qg4 Ba6 30.Re1 Bc4 31.Qe4 Bxd4+ 32.Qxd4 b5) 19.Qc2 (19.f4 Bxf4) 19...Bb7 20.Nf5 Ne7 21.Nxd6 cxd6 22.Qe4 (22.f4 Qh5 23.Qc3 f6 24.Re1 (24.Qb3; 24.Rd1) ) 22...Bxd5 23.Bxd5 Nxd5 24.Rd1 Nf6 25.Qe7 Qh5 26.Qxd6 Ne4 27.Qxd7 Qe2 28.Qd4 f6 29.Rc1 Qf3 30.Qc4+ (30.h4 Nxg3 31.fxg3 Qxg3+ 32.Kf1 Qf3+ 33.Kg1 Qg3+=) 30...Kh8 31.Bd4 Ng5 32.Bxb6 Nh3+ 33.Kf1 Qh1+ 34.Ke2 Ng1+ 35.Kd3 Qb7 36.Qc6 Qa6+ 37.b5 Qa3+ 38.Rc3 Qa2 39.Rc2 Qb3+=) 13.Be3 (13.Nd4 c5 14.Nf5 (14.d6 Bxd6 15.Nf5 Bc7 16.Nd6 Qf6 17.Nxc8 Raxc8-/+) 14...d6 15.Nxe7+ Qxe7 16.Re1 Qh4 17.f4 Nxf4 18.Re4) 13...Re8 14.Re1 Bf6 15.Qd2 d6 16.Rac1 a6 17.Nd4 Nh4 18.Be2 (18.Bd3 Bh3=/+) 18...Nf5=/+;

b3) 12.Be3 Re8 13.Nd4 b6 14.d6 Ne5 (14...Bxd6 15.Qf3 Ne5 16.Bxf7+ Nxf7 17.Qxa8+/=) 15.dxc7 Qxc7 16.Bd5 Bb7 17.Nb5 Qb8 18.f4 Nc4 =/+

11...Bxd2
(11...Bc5 12.Ne4 d6 13.Nxc5 dxc5 14.Bf4; 11...Ba5 12.d6 cxd6 13.Ne4 d5 14.Bxd5 Nxd5 15.Qxd5+/=)
12.Bxd2 d6 13.Re1
(13.Qb3 c5 14.dxc6 bxc6 15.Rfe1 Ng6 16.Qc2 Bb7 17.Bd3 c5. Also 13.h4!? does not work now because of 13…Nf5! Also 13…Ng6 14.h5 Ne5 15.Be2 h6 16.Rc1 c5 seems good enough.)
13...a5!? (Ametanoitos)

Let me explain the idea. In this position black will neutralize white's initiative with a simple plan of development:Bd7, Ng6, c5 and Re8. However black has to be careful not to allow white chances for counterplay. The immediate 13…Ng6 (variation B below) allows white to attack the central hanging pawns that will appear after c5 by means of b4-b5, while the immediate development of the bishop runs into the annoying 14.Qb3 (variation A below) as Mr Buecker has kindly pointed out. As black cannot do without pushing the c pawn, the move 13…a5! is best played now, preparing c5 while not commiting the pieces yet.

a) 13...Bf5 14.Qb3 Qd7
a1) 14...Rb8 15.Qe3 Nc8 16.Qf4 Nb6 17.Bb3 Qf6 18.Bc3 Qg6 19.Re3 f6 20.Rg3 Qh5 21.a4 Bg6 22.a5 Nd7 23.Bd4 Rfe8 24.Qc1 Rbc8 25.Bxa7 Bf7 26.h3 Bxd5 27.Qd2 Bxb3 28.Rxb3 b6 29.axb6 cxb6 30.Bxb6;
a2) 14...Ng6 15.Qxb7 Ne5 16.Rac1 Qh4 17.Be2 Rab8 18.Qxc7 Rxb2 19.Qxd6 Nd3 20.g3 Qd4 21.Be3 Nxc1 22.Bxd4 Nxe2+ 23.Rxe2 Rxe2 24.Kg2 Rfe8 (24...Be4+ 25.Kh3 Bf5+ 26.g4 Bxg4+ 27.Kg3) 25.Qf4 Be4+ 26.Kh3 h6 (26...Bxd5 27.Qg5 Be6+ 28.g4) 27.d6 Bd5 28.Be3 Be6+ 29.g4 h5 30.Kh4 hxg4;
15.Qxb7 Rfb8 16.Qa6 Rxb2 17.Bc3 Rb6 18.Qa5 with compensation due to the weakened queenside and 2 bishops.
b) 13...Ng6 14.Rc1 c5 (BUT 14…a5! Will transpose to our analysis after 13…a5 14.Rc1. If 14.b4 Bf5 seems nice for Black) 15.dxc6 bxc6 16.b4! Bf5 17.Bc3 d5 18.Ba6 Qd7 19.Qd4 f6 20.Qc5 Rae8 21.b5 Rxe1+ 22.Rxe1 cxb5 23.Bxb5 Qf7 24.Bc6 Rc8 25.Qxd5+/=;

14.Qh5 looks like the best try, alternatives:

a)14.b4 axb4 15.axb4 Rxa1 16.Qxa1 Ng6=/+
b)14.Rc1 Ng6 (preventing white's only energetic possibility, h4!, Luzin)
[14...a4?! 15.h4! Ng6 (15...Bf5 16.h5+/=; 15...Bd7 16.h5 h6 17.Qf3 c5 18.Bd3+/=) 16.h5 Ne5 17.h6 g6 18.Be3 f6 19.Qd4 Bf5]

15.Bd3

b1) 15.g3 Ne5 16.Be2 Bf5=/+;
b2) 15.Re3 looks interesting but with careful play comes to nothing as well:
15…c5 16.dxc6 bxc6 17.Bd3 Bd7=/+ (17...Qc7 18.Qc2) 18.Qc2 d5 19.Rce1 (19.h3 Rb8 20.b4 axb4 21.Bxb4 Re8 22.Rce1 Rxe3 23.Rxe3 Qg5 24.Bd6 Rd8=/+) 19...Qf6 (19...a4) 20.Rg3 Rfe8 (20...Rfb8 21.Bc3 d4 22.Bd2 Re8) 21.Rxe8+ (21.Rxe8+ Rxe8 22.Bxa5 Nf4 23.Bxh7+ Kh8 24.Bd3 Nxd3 25.Qxd3 Qxb2) 21...Bxe8 22.h3 Bd7 23.Qb3 Qd6 24.Qb6 a4 25.Bb4 Qb8 26.Qc5 Qc7 =/+

15...Bd7 16.Qc2 (16.Be4 Re8=/+) 16...c5 17.dxc6 (17.Bxg6 hxg6 18.Bf4 Qf6=/+; 17.Qb3 Qc7 18.Qc2 f5=/+) 17...bxc6 18.Bc3 (18.h3 d5) 18...d5 19.Qd2 (19.Bd4 Qg5=/+) 19...Qc7=/+

c) 14.Bc3 Ng6 (14...Bf5 15.Qd4 f6) 15.Qd4 f6 16.Re3 Re8 17.Rae1 Rxe3 18.Rxe3 Ne5 19.Be2 Bf5=/+

d) 14. h4! (Luzin)
14...h6 [14...Ng6 15.h5 Ne5 16.Be2 forced! Because otherwise Bg4 would win for Black 16… h6 {or 16…Qh4 with an unclear game} 17.Rc1 c5 18.dxc6 bxc6 19.f4 Qb6+ 20.Kh1 Nd7 21.Bf3 Qxb2=; 14...Nf5 15.h5 Qf6 (15...Qh4 16.Rc1 Qd4 17.Bf1 Qxb2 18.Rxc7 Qxa3 19.Bc3+/-) ] 15.h5 c5 16.dxc6 bxc6 17.Qf3 Rb8 18.b4

So it seems that here White has good compensation which makes 14…Ng6 the most reliable move.

14...Bd7 this is the right move order! the following variations show us why,if bored to check them, after Bd3 and Ng6 white creates problems with a timely Bg5 forcing the weakening f6 because of the threat Be7 winning the d6 pawn. By chosing the right move order black parries these tricks as will be shown in the main line.
14...Bf5? 15.Rxe7
14...a4 15.Bd3 Ng6 16.Bg5 (16.Rac1 Bd7) 16...f6 17.Bd2 f5 18.Rac1 Bd7 19.Bb1 c5 20.dxc6 bxc6 21.Rc3 (21.Bg5 Qb6 22.Be7) 21...Qf6 (21...Re8 22.Rh3 Rxe1+ 23.Bxe1 Nf8) 22.Rce3 (22.Rh3 Rae8 23.Qxh7+ Kf7 24.Rxe8 Rxe8) 22...d5 23.Bc3 d4 24.Ba2+ Kh8 25.Bxd4 Qxd4 26.Qxg6 Be8;
14...Ng6 15.Bd3 c5 16.dxc6 bxc6 17.Bg5 f6 (17...Qb6 18.Be7; 17...Qc7 18.Be7 Bg4 19.Qxg4 Nxe7 20.Bxh7+ Kxh7 21.Qh4+ Kg8 22.Rxe7 Qb6 23.Re3 Qxb2 24.Rd1 Rfd8 25.Rh3 g6 26.f4|^) 18.Bd2 f5 19.Rac1 Qd7 a) 19...Bd7 20.Bb1 Qb6 (20...Qh4 21.Ba2+ d5 (21...Kh8 22.Qxh4 Nxh4 23.Re7 Be8 24.Bc3+-) 22.Qxh4 Nxh4 23.Rc5+/=) 21.Bc3 Rae8 (21...d5 22.Re3 c5 23.Ba2 Be6 24.Rh3) ; b) 19...Ne5 20.Bb1 (20.Bc4+ Kh8 (20...Nxc4 21.Rxc4 Bd7 (21...g6 22.Qh6 c5 23.Bg5 (23.Rh4 Ra7) 23...Re8 24.Rce4 Rxe4 25.Rxe4 Qf8 26.Re7 Qxh6 27.Bxh6 Rb8 28.Rg7+ Kh8 29.Rf7 (29.Re7 Kg8=) 29...Be6 30.Rf8+ Rxf8 31.Bxf8 c4 32.Bxd6=) 22.Rh4 h6 23.Bxh6 Be8 24.Qg5 Qxg5 25.Bxg5) 21.Bf4 Qf6 22.Bg5 Qg6 23.Qxg6 Nxg6 24.Ba2) 20...Be6; ]

15.Bd3 Ng6 16.Rac1
[16.Re3 Re8 17.Rae1 Rxe3 18.Rxe3 c5 19.dxc6 bxc6=/+; 16.Bc3 c5 17.dxc6 bxc6 18.Re3 Re8 19.Rae1 Rxe3 20.Rxe3 Be6=/+]
16...c5 [16...Re8 17.Rxe8+ Bxe8 18.Be4 f6 (18...h6 19.Bc3) 19.Qd1 (19.Rc3 Nf8) 19...Bf7 (19...Qd7 20.Qc2) 20.Qc2 Qe8 21.Bf5]
17.dxc6 bxc6 18.Bc3
[the point of our chosen move order is that now 18.Bg5 does not work due to Qb8=/+] 18...Re8
[18...a4 19.Rcd1 Re8 20.Rxe8+ Qxe8 21.Bc2 Qe7 (21...d5 22.Rd4=) 22.Re1 Be6 23.Qd1; 18...Be6 19.Be4 Qd7 20.Qf3 d5 (20...Ne7 21.Qf4 Bf5 (21...Nd5 22.Bxd5 Bxd5) 22.Bf3 Be6) 21.Bxg6 hxg6 22.Bd4]
19.Rxe8+ Bxe8 20.Re1 Bd7 21.Be4 Qf8!=/+
[21...Qc7 22.Qd1 Re8 23.Bxg6 hxg6 24.Rxe8+ Bxe8 25.Qd4 f6 26.Qa4=; 21...d5 22.Bxg6 hxg6 23.Qe5 f6 24.Qd6=; 21...Qb6 22.Bc2 Be6 23.Rxe6 fxe6 24.Bxg6 hxg6 25.Qxg6 Qc7 26.Qxe6+ Kf8 27.Qh3=]

After 21…Qf8! White doesn’t have Bxg6 and Qe5 (with the threat of mate)  and then Bd4 after which he claims a blockade on the dark squares and with that a draw! We said above that we think the nature of the compensation is mainly defensive. There is a lot of game left but we think that Black keeps a slight advantage.

So, after a large practical examination of all White’s possibilities we came to the conclusion that Luzin’s idea  to play h4 to claim some valuable squares that Ng6 would like to use, is the most promising idea White has leading to some sort of unclear position. So we decided to nominate the move 13...Ng6! (Luzin/Ametanoitos)
We believe that White has nothing better than to transpose to a line we analyse above after 14.b4 Bf5 or 14.Rc1 a5 or 14.Qh5 a5(the main line of the above analysis)  or 14.Bc3 a5 etc....
  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #9 - 07/26/09 at 10:05:35
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The following stem game of the variation (also from the pgn file) is the last example which I'll publish here. How strong was the 19 year-old Emil Schallopp in 1862, six years after he had learned chess? His obituary said that Schallopp was going to develop a considerable playing strength in 1863-1871, when he played against such greats as Adolf Anderssen, Johannes Zukertort, Gustav Neumann and Berthold Suhle. In other words, in 1862 Schallopp was still a patzer.


Dr. Pomtow - Emil Schallopp
Berlin, August 22, 1862 (source: Neue Berliner Schachzeitung 1864, p.240)
Comments by Stefan Bücker

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2!
Criticized ("?") by Neue Berliner Schach-Zeitung 1864, but 144 years later the Russian GM Dmitry Chuprov (Elo 2577) played it in two of his tournament games.
7...Nxe4 8.Bd5?
To prevent d7-d5 is an original, but clearly insufficient idea. Critical continuations are 8. d5! or perhaps 8. 0–0, which are discussed in the last gamefile "POMTOW ATTACK 7...Nxe4 8.d5!".
8...Nxd2
8...Nf6 is better according to Neue Berliner Schach-Zeitung 1864, p. 240: "Der Abtausch foerdert die Entwicklung von Weiss." [The exchange boosts White's development.] Obviously, if the Bd5 has to retreat after 8...Nf6 - and in fact there is nothing better -, the move 8.Bd5 only means a serious waste of time. Thus, the rest of the game is of historical, but no longer of theoretical interest.
9.Bxd2 0–0
9...Bxd2+! 10.Qxd2 Qe7+ 11.Kf1 0–0 12.h4 Qd6 Black is much better, =+ at least; or 9...Qe7+! 10.Kf1.
10.0–0 Bxd2 11.Qxd2 Ne7 12.Bb3 d5 13.Rfe1 Bg4
13...Qd6.
14.Ne5
14.Qb4 (with sufficient compensation) Bxf3?! 15.Rxe7 Bg4 16.Re5.
14...Bh5
14...Be6.

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15.g4?!
15.Qg5 Bg6 16.Nxg6 Nxg6 17.Qxd5 =.
15...Bg6 16.Nxg6? fxg6?
16...Nxg6 -/+.
17.Re5 c6 18.Rae1 Rf7
18...Nc8!.
19.Qg5
19.Qb4 +=.
19...Kf8= 20.Qh4 h6 21.g5? h5?
21...Nf5 –+.
22.Bc2 = Nf5?
Criticized ("?") by Neue Berliner Schach-Zeitung 1864
23.Bxf5+- Rxf5 24.Rxf5+ gxf5 25.Qxh5 Qa5 26.Re6 Qd2 27.g6 Qh6 28.Qxf5+ Kg8 29.Qf7+ Kh8 30.Qe8+ Rxe8 31.Rxe8 mate.
Thanks to Dr. Michael Negele for submitting the source.

If a member knows another 7.Nbd2 game which seems relevant, please publish it in this thread. And any nomination to the competition should also be published here, of course - not only in the "chat" thread!
  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #8 - 07/26/09 at 09:19:49
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Another game from the pgn file, though 7...0-0 seems less important than the alternatives.

Horst Stümpfig - Rudi Pieleck
Internet 2008
Comments by Stefan Bücker

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2! 0–0

For 7...Nxe4, 7...Bxd2 and 7...d5 see the other games and analyses. The text move is passive, White gets a comfortable position.

8.d5!

(a) 8.e5 Ne4 (8...d5=) 9.0–0 Nxd2 10.Bxd2 d5 11.Bxb4 Nxb4 12.Qb3 a5 (12...dxc4) 13.Bd3? (13.Be2 +=) 13...Nxd3 [1/2–1/2, 50] Valickova,K-Vanekova,V, Rimavska Sobota 1996.
(b) 8.0–0
(b1) 8...Re8 9.e5 (9.Qb3 Qe7 10.e5 d5 11.Bd3 +/-) 9...d5 10.Bb3 Ng4? [1–0, 37] Kus,M-Prytz,O, Istanbul 2002 11.Nb1 +/-.
(b2) 8...Bxd2 9.Qxd2? (9.Bxd2; 9.Nxd2) 9...Nxe4 10.Qf4 Chorley (1435) - Linger, Sacramento Chess Club Championship 2002; 10...d5 -/+.
(b3) 8...Nxe4 9.Nxe4 d5 10.Bg5! (10.Bd3 dxe4 11.Bxe4 Bg4 12.d5 Ne5 13.Qb3 Nxf3+ 14.Bxf3 Bxf3 15.Qxf3 Re8 = [0–1, 30] Bui Dang Ngoc – Hoang T Khanh, Phu Dong 2004) 10...Qd7 (10...f6? 11.Bxf6 gxf6 12.Bb3) 11.Bd3 dxe4 12.Bxe4 +=.

8...Ne7 9.0–0 d6

(a) 9...Bxd2 10.Nxd2 +/-.
(b) 9...Ng6!? comes into consideration, since White's advantage isn't large: 10.a3 Bxd2 11.Nxd2 Re8 12.Re1 d6 13.h3 Bd7 14.b4 Ne5 15.Qb3 Nxc4 16.Qxc4 Rc8 17.Bb2 +=.

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10.Re1

10.Nd4? Bxd2 11.Bxd2 Nxe4 12.Re1 Nxd2 13.Qxd2
(a) 13...Ng6 14.Re3 (14.Rac1 Bd7 15.Bf1 a6 16.g3 and White has (almost) sufficient compensation for the pawn) 14...Bd7 15.Rae1 a6 16.Bd3 Ne5 17.Be2 Re8 [0–1, 66] Shutova - Gvozdeva, Oktjabrsky 2004.
(b) 13...Bd7 14.Rac1 Re8 =+.

10...c5

10...Ng6 11.a3 Ba5 12.h3 Qe7 13.b4 Bb6 14.Bb2 Nd7 (14...Nf4 15.e5) 15.Bd3 Nde5 16.Nc4 +=.

11.dxc6 Nxc6 12.a3 Bc5 13.b4 Bd4 14.Nxd4 Nxd4 15.Bb2 Nc6 16.Qb3 Qe7 17.f4 Be6 18.Qd3

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18...Bxc4? 19.Nxc4 Rfd8 20.Rad1+- Ng4

20...Ne8 would be hopeless: 21.b5 Nb8 22.e5 d5 23.Nd6 Nxd6 24.Qxd5 +-.

21.Qg3 Nf6 22.b5 Nh5

22...Nb8 23.Ne3 Ne8 24.Nf5 Qf8 25.e5 +-.

23.Qf3 +-. White wins a piece. After a few more moves: 1–0
  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #7 - 07/26/09 at 09:00:01
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Two minor corrections:
Quote:
(a) 8.a3? forces an exchange...
(b) ...but 8.0–0 does the same more efficiently: 8...Bxd2+ 9.Bxd2 Nxd2 [0–1, 38] in Blaskan,I-Moruzzi,M, Chalkidiki 2000, and [0–1, 64] in Chang,A-Richter,S, Box Hill 2000.

read:
(a) 8.a3? forces an exchange (but 8.0–0 does the same more efficiently, see line "d") 8...Bxd2+ 9.Bxd2 Nxd2 [0–1, 38] in Blaskan,I-Moruzzi,M, Chalkidiki 2000, and [0–1, 64] in Chang,A-Richter,S, Box Hill 2000.

The further remark "with [8.0-0] we are leaving the area for which games have been available" was contradicted by the later quote of SAGLIONE - MAGALLANES (also in the pgn file).

  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #6 - 07/22/09 at 23:16:32
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I continue to publish material from the pgn file, for people who hate to download pgn files (for whatever reason). The following was my proposed main line, though I admit that 7...d5 and 7...Bxd2+ also have their points. The text is edited for better readability. Games quoted in caps are referring to the pgn file. Analysis by: Stefan Bücker.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2 Nxe4

For 7...d5 see CHUPROV - GENBA; for 7...Bxd2+ see SAGLIONE - MAGALLANES; for 7...0–0 see STÜMPFIG - PIELECK.

8.d5!

(a) 8.a3? forces an exchange...
(b) ...but 8.0–0 does the same more efficiently: 8...Bxd2+ 9.Bxd2 Nxd2 [0–1, 38] in Blaskan,I-Moruzzi,M, Chalkidiki 2000, and [0–1, 64] in Chang,A-Richter,S, Box Hill 2000.
(c) 8.Qe2? d5 9.0–0 (9.Bd3 0–0 10.0–0 Re8–+ [0–1, 22] Delgado,M-Castaneda,K, Bento Goncalves 2000) 9...Bxd2 10.Bxd2 f5? (Instead, 10...Bg4! would have been more difficult to meet, for example: 11.Bb5 0–0 12.Bxc6 Bxf3 13.gxf3 Nxd2 -/+) 11.Bb5 0–0 12.Bxc6 bxc6 13.Ne5 Qd6 14.Bf4 with compensation [1/2–1/2, 29] Ptacek,J-Schovanek,J, Most 1999.
(d) The only real alternative to the text move, though in my opinion less ambitious, is 8.0–0:
(d1) 8...d5 9.Nxe4 (9.Bd3? Bf5 -/+) 9...0–0! (9...dxe4? 10.Ng5 +/- 0–0?? 11.Qh5 +-) 10.Bd3 dxe4 11.Bxe4 +=.
(d2) 8...0–0 9.Nxe4 d5 transposes to variation "d1": 10.Bd3 (10.Bxd5 Qxd5 11.Nc3 Qd8? 12.d5 Klesa,J-Drab,T, Frymburk 2002; 12. Bg5 +=; 11...Qc4! =+) 10...dxe4 11.Bxe4 +=.
(d3) 8...Bxd2!? 9.Nxd2 (9.Bxd2? d5 loses a pawn without compensation, Merino,F-Ramirez Rio,J, Spain 1996) 9...d5 (9...Nxd2? 10.Re1+! Ne7 11.Bxd2 0–0 12.Bg5 Re8 Simlova,K-Rehak,M, Plzen 1996; 13.Qb3 +-) 10.Nxe4 0–0 (10...dxe4 11.d5 Ne5 12.Re1 f5 13.Qb3; 11.Re1!?) 11.Bg5 Qd7 (11...f6? 12.Bxf6 gxf6 13.Bb3) 12.Bd3 dxe4 13.Bxe4 Qxd4 14.Qc2 h6 15.Be3 Qf6 16.Rad1 Re8 17.Rfe1 Nb4 18.Qc4 (18.Qxc7 Rxe4 19.Rd8+ Kh7 20.Rxc8 Re7!) 18...Nc6, about =.
(d4) 8...Nxd2 9.Re1+ (9.Bxd2 Bxd2 10.Qxd2 d5 11.Rfe1+ Ne7 leads to the main line; 11.Bb3 0–0 12.Bc2 Qf6 13.h3? Bxh3 Petimezas,M-Gerrits,B, Hengelo 1994) 9...Ne7 10.Bxd2 Bxd2 11.Qxd2 d5! (11...0–0 12.Qg5! d5 13.Rxe7 dxc4 14.Rae1 with an interesting situation; weaker was 12...Ng6? Sell,G-Rasch,W, Hassloch 1998 13.Bxf7+! Kh8 14.Qxd8 Rxd8 15.Bxg6 hxg6 16.Re7 +-) 12.Bxd5 (12.Bd3?! 0–0 13.Rac1 c6 14.h3 Nf5 15.b4 =+ is a dubious kind of "minority attack", rather optimistic concerning White's material deficit. White's activity here is probably not enough to compensate for the pawn) 12...Qxd5 13.Re5 Qd8 14.Rae1 Be6 15.d5 about =.
(e) For the weak 8.Bd5? see the stem game of the variation, DR. POMTOW - SCHALLOPP.

8...Ne7

8...Na5?! 9.Bd3 Nxd2 10.Bxd2 Qe7+ is original, but could have been punished: 11.Kf1! (11.Be2? Nc4 12.Bc3 Bxc3+ 13.bxc3 0–0 14.0–0 Nb6 and Black was much better, Viennois,R-Cristofari,A, Montpellier 1997) 11...0–0 (11...b6 12.Bxb4 Qxb4 13.Qe2+ Qe7 14.Qc2 Qc5 15.Re1+ Kf8 16.Qe2 Kg8 17.a3 Qf8 18.b4 Nb7 19.Qc2 +/-) 12.Bxh7+ Kxh7 13.Ng5+ Kg6 14.h4 +/-.

9.0–0!

9.a3?! Bxd2+ 10.Bxd2 d6 loses time, but won a game [1–0, 40] in Kartseva,N-Broeker,S, Wolfsberg 2004. - With the text move we are leaving the area for which games have been available.

9...Nxd2

9...Nf6 seems to be weaker: 10.Qb3 Bd6 11.Re1 0–0 12.Ne4 Nxe4 13.Rxe4 Ng6 (13...Rb8 14.Bg5) 14.Bd2 c5 15.Rae1 Rb8 16.Qd3 a6 17.a4 b5 18.axb5 axb5 19.Bxb5 Qb6 20.Bc4 Qxb2 21.Rg4 Ra8 (21...Ne5? 22.Rxg7+ Kxg7 23.Bc3 +-) 22.Bc3 Qa3 23.Nh4 +/-.

The main alternative is 9...Bxd2, e.g.:
(a) 10.Bxd2 0–0 (10...Nxd2 11.Qxd2 d6 12.Rfe1 0–0 13.Re3 h6 14.Rae1 Ng6 15.Nd4 Ne5 16.Rc1 Ng4 17.Rg3 Kh8 18.Rgc3 Nf6 19.Qc2 Re8 20.Bb3 Re4 21.Rxc7 Rxd4 22.Rxc8 Rd1+ 23.Qxd1 Rxc8 24.g3 Kg8 =; 15...Qf6!?; 12...Bg4? 13.Rxe7+) 11.Bb4 d6 12.Re1 Nc5 13.h3 (for 13.Qd2!? see the correspondence game SAGLIONE - MAGALLANES, which White won in 42 moves) 13...b6 14.Bc3 a5 15.Qd2 Bd7 16.b3 Ng6 17.Bb2 Re8 18.Rxe8+ Bxe8 19.Re1 with compensation.
(b) 10.Nxd2!?, for example:
(b1) 10...Nd6?!. To refute this move beyond any doubt may be difficult, but White gets fine chances for an attack: 11.Bd3 0–0 12.Qc2 h6 13.Ne4 Ne8 14.d6 cxd6 15.Bf4 d5 16.Nd6 Qb6 17.Qe2 Ng6 18.Bxg6 Nxd6 (18...fxg6 19.Nxe8 Rxf4 20.Qe5 Qd4 21.Qd6 a5 22.Nc7 Rf6 23.Qg3 Raa6 24.Nxa6 +/-; 20...Rf7 21.Nc7) 19.Bc2 Re8 20.Qd3 Ne4 21.Rae1 Re6 22.Qxd5 Nxf2! 23.Be3 Rxe3 24.Rxe3 Qxe3 25.Rxf2 Qe1+ 26.Rf1 Qe3+ 27.Kh1 Qe6 28.Qd3 (28.Bb3) 28...Qg6 29.Qxg6 fxg6 30.Bb3+ Kh7 31.Rf8 g5 32.Bc4! +/- b5 (32...b6? 33.Bd3+ g6 34.Ba6 Bb7 35.Rf7+ Kg8 36.Bxb7) 33.Bxb5 Kg6 34.Kg1 Bb7 35.Bd3+ Kh5 36.Rf7 +/-.
(b2) 10...Nf6 11.Nf3 0–0 (11...d6? 12.Bg5) 12.Bg5 Ng6 13.d6 cxd6 14.Qxd6 Ne4 15.Bxf7+ Rxf7 16.Qxg6 Qe8 17.Qh5 b6 18.Rfe1 Bb7 =.

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10.Nxd2

An attempt to keep White's bishop pair intact. It isn't clear whether this is better or worse than to take with the bishop: 10.Bxd2 Bxd2 11.d6 (11.Qxd2 transposes to the variation 9...Bxd2 10.Bxd2 Nxd2 11.Qxd2 above. In that line 11.d6 obviously would not have been possible because of 11. ..Nxf3+, so the text move is an attempt to profit from the difference) 11...Bb4 (less risky: 11...cxd6 12.Qxd2 0–0 about =) 12.Ng5 (12.dxe7 Bxe7 13.Qb3 0–0 14.Ne5 c6 15.Bxf7+ Kh8 16.Bg8 d5 17.Nf7+ Rxf7 18.Bxf7 Qc7 =) 12...cxd6 (12...Bxd6?? 13.Nxf7 loses the queen) 13.Nxf7 Qc7 14.Qb3 d5 (14...Rf8? 15.Qxb4 Rxf7 16.Bxf7+ Kxf7 17.Qf4+ Kg8 18.Rae1 Qd8 19.Qh4 +-) 15.Bxd5 Rf8 16.Qxb4 Nxd5 17.Nd6+ Kd8 18.Nxb7+ Ke8 19.Nd6+ Kd8 20.Qa3 (20.Qh4+ Rf6 21.Ne4 Qf4 22.Qxh7 Rh6 23.Qg8+ Kc7 24.Rfc1+ Rc6 =) 20...Rf6 21.Ne4 Re6, for example:
(a) 22.Rfe1?! Bb7 23.Rad1 (23.Ng5 Rxe1+ the difference to the main line is that this exchange is accompanied by a check, so White has no time for 24.Qf8+ etc., mate. So: 24.Rxe1 Qf4 -/+) 23...Bc6.
(b) 22.Ng5 Rf6 23.Ne4 = (23.Rad1 Ba6 24.Rfe1 Bb7).
(c) 22.Rae1 Qc6. Of course there are several other continuations; what follows is only a sample line. Black seems to hold. 23.Rc1 Qb6 24.Ng5 Rf6 25.Ne4 Re6 26.Qf3 Bb7 27.Nc5 Rf6 28.Qh3 Bc6 29.Qxh7 Qxb2 30.Qxg7 Rxf2 31.Qg8+ Kc7 32.Qg3+ Nf4 33.Na6+ Kb7 34.Nc5+ Kc7 35.Na6+ Kb7 =.

10...0–0

10...Bxd2 11.Bxd2 (11.d6?!) 11...d6 12.Re1 0–0 13.Rc1 h6 (13...Re8). White has sufficient compensation for the pawn. Of course there is no forcing variation, the following moves only serve as an example: 14.h3 Re8 (14...Bf5) 15.Qh5 Ng6 16.Rxe8+ Qxe8 17.Bd3 Ne5 18.Bb1 c6 19.f4 Ng6 20.Re1 Qf8 21.f5 Ne5 22.f6 g6 23.Qh4 +/-.

11.a3

For analysis on 11.Nb3, see Luzin's reply #32 in the "Chat" thread.

11...Bc5

(a) 11...Bxd2 is better than the immediate Bxd2 in the last note, since the inclusion of a3 and 0–0 improves Black's chances. I believe that White still gets enough compensation. The idea was advocated by Luzin in reply #32 in the "Chat" thread, as being clearly favourable for Black. In reply #33 I proposed another treatment for White, which seems to give good compensation.
(b) 11...Ba5 12.b4 Bb6 13.d6 cxd6 14.Ne4 d5 15.Bxd5 Nxd5 16.Qxd5 Qe7 (16...d6) 17.Nd6 Qe6 18.Qd3 Bc7 19.Bf4 Bxd6 20.Bxd6 Re8 21.Qd2 Qf5 22.Rae1 Re6 23.f4 b6 24.Rxe6 fxe6 (24...dxe6 25.Bb8!! Qd5 26.Rd1 +=) 25.Be5 Qe4 26.Re1 Qg6 about =.

12.Ne4 d6 13.Nxc5 dxc5 14.Bf4.

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With chances for both sides. For the sacrificed pawn, White has active pieces and the bishop pair.

  
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Re: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
Reply #5 - 07/17/09 at 21:13:24
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Nomination #2 Improvement for White in the line with d5 (Chuprov-Genba above!)

I do not like 11.Qc2 because of the black alternatives to 11...Bg4:

A) 11...Bf6 12.Ne4 Bg4
B) 11...Nb6 12.Bd3 g6

and in both cases i do not see a white advantage.

Therefore i suggest:

11.Re1! with two possible lines:

A) 11...Be6 12.Ne4 h6 13.Qc2 Re8 14.b4 and white has won space as in Stefan's suggestion above after 11.Qc2 Bg4 12.b4!

B) 11...Bf6 12.Ne4 Nb6 13.Ba2 Bg4 14.h3 Bxf3 15.Qxf3 Nxd4 16.Nxf6+ Qxf6 17.Qxf6 gxf6 18.Re7 White is a pawn down, but has more than compensation, rook on 7th rank, bishop pair, isolated and doubled black pawns - and furthermore the seemingly freeing move 18...Rae8 collapses after 19.Bxf7+!!

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The result of the tricky moveorder 11.Re1! is that white has eliminated 11.Qc2 Bg4 12.Re1 Bf6 =
12.Ne4 is in the variations above an ideal square for the knight.
  
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Re: Kaissiber Theoretical Competition
Reply #4 - 07/15/09 at 11:29:13
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Can Black take the pawn on e4 or should he rather be cautious and prevent the advance d5 by playing 7...d5 himself? The latter approach is best illustrated by the following game (this game is included in the PDF file of the competition, which can be downloaded, see the starting post of this thread).

Dmitry Chuprov (2577) - Vladimir Genba (2429)
Pardubice 2008 (Czech Open, round 4)
Comments by Stefan Bücker

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2! d5
It is one of the key questions in this opening, whether White can get his d4-d5 attack rolling. Should Black prevent it by playing d5 himself? Against both 7.Bd2 Bxd2 8.Nbxd2 and 7.Kf1, the reaction d7-d5 is regarded as the best defence. In my opinion, against the Pomtow Attack 7...Nxe4 is the main line, but the text move comes close.
8.exd5
Alternatives:
(a) 8.Bxd5? Nxd5 9.exd5 Qxd5 gives Black a dream position: 10.a3 Ba5 11.b4 Bb6 12.Nb3 Bg4 13.Bb2 [1/2–1/2, 41] Fryda,L-Ruzicka,M, Volyne 2003 13...0–0–0 14.0–0 Rhe8 –+.
(b) 8.e5? dxc4 9.exf6 gxf6! (9...Qxf6 [0–1, 62] Shutova,T-Shabrina,T, Oktjabrsky 2004) 10.0–0 Qd5 -/+.
8...Nxd5
8...Qe7+ is a very interesting in-between check involving the sacrifice of a pawn which so far happened only in an U18w championship of Badischer Schachverband: 9.Kf1! (9.Qe2= Qxe2+ 10.Bxe2? Nxd5 [0–1, 38] Scheurer,Valerie-Beier,Nina, U18w Baden 2008; 9.Be2!?) 9...Na5 10.Qa4+ Bd7 11.Bb5 += and it remains unclear whether Black's sacrifice can be justified (11...c6; 11...0–0–0). The += assessment is only a first guess from the computer.
9.0–0
9.Qb3? Na5 10.Qa4+ (10.Qd3 Nxc4 11.Qxc4 [1–0, 38] Andersson,T-Ballester Sanz,J, Mamaia 1991; 11...Qe7+ 12.Ne5 Nb6 -/+) 10...Bd7! (10...Nc6 11.Qb3 Na5 12.Qa4+ Nc6 13.Qb3 1/2–1/2 Alonso Alvarez,A-Armas Gago,M, Asturias 1997) 11.Bb5 Qe7+ 12.Kf1 Nc6 -/+ 13.a3 a6! 14.axb4 Nb6 15.Qd1 axb5 -/+ White's position is a mess, maybe already –+.
9...0–0 10.a3 Be7 11.Qc2 Bg4

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12.Re1
12.b4! seems more precise. The move Rfe1 may be useful in many, but not in all cases (Rae1 could be preferable, or the c-file might become more important). On the other hand, the development b2-b4 followed by Bb2 prepares several aggressive ideas like Ne5 or Qb3 or play on the c-file. 12...a6 13.Re1 (13.h3 wastes time: 13...Bh5 14.Re1 Bg6 15.Qb3 Nb6 16.Bb2 Bf6 and Black is fine; 13.Bb2!?) 13...Qd7 14.Bd3 h6 (14...g6 15.h3 Bxh3 (15...Be6 16.Ne4 +=) 16.gxh3 Qxh3 17.Re4 f5 18.Bc4 with heavy complications, apparently favouring White.) 15.h3 Be6 16.Bb2 Rae8 += (16...Nf4 17.Be4 Bxh3?! 18.gxh3 Qxh3 19.Nh2 Bd6 20.Ndf1 +/-). After 16...Rae8, Black is not without resources, but altogether I'd prefer White's position. He can choose between 17.Nc4, 17. Rad1, 17.Nf1 and other good moves.
12...Bh5
Alternatives:
(a) In the second game by Chuprov there followed: 12...Re8 13.Bd3 Nf6 14.h3 Bh5 15.Bb5 (15.b4!? Nxd4 16.Nxd4 Qxd4 17.Bb2 with compensation) 15...Qd5 16.Bxc6 bxc6 17.Re5 Qd7 18.Ra5 Bf8 19.Qc4 Rad8 20.b4 Bd6 21.Bb2 Nd5 22.Kf1 Bf4! -/+ (22...Re3! -/+) 23.Qb3 Bxd2 24.Nxd2 Re2 25.Nc4 Qf5–+ 26.f3 (26.Qg3 Rc2) 26...Rde8 27.Ne5 Re3 28.Qa4 Bxf3 29.Nxf3 Rxf3+ 30.Kg1 Rg3 31.Qxc6 0–1 Chuprov,Dmitry (2577) - Potapov,Pavel (2418), Pardubice 2008 (Czech Open F).
(b) 12...Bf6= seems simpler than the moves seen in Chuprov's practice: 13.Qe4 Bxf3 14.Nxf3 Nb6 15.Bd3 g6 16.Be3 Re8= followed by 17...Qd6.
13.b4
13.Bb5 Bg6 14.Ne4 Re8 15.Bxc6 bxc6 16.Qxc6 (16.Ne5 Bf6) 16...Bxa3 17.Bg5 Be7 =.
13...Bg6 14.Qb3 Nb6 15.Bb2 Bf6 16.Rad1 Ne7 17.Bf1 Qd5 18.Qxd5 Nexd5 19.Ne5 a5 20.b5 Rfd8? +=
20...Bf5=.
21.Nxg6 hxg6 22.Ne4 Na4 23.Ba1 Be7 24.Rd3 f5 25.Nd2 Bf6 26.Nf3 Nab6 27.Rdd1 Kf7 28.Rc1? Re8?
28...Be7! attacking the pawn a3, with counter play. White's last move was inaccurate, but Black missed the opportunity.
29.Ne5+ Bxe5 30.dxe5 Ke6 31.Bd4 +/- Rac8 32.g3 Red8 33.Rc2 Rd7 34.Rec1 Rf7 35.f4 Rd7 36.Bf2 g5 37.fxg5 Kxe5 38.Re1+ 1–0
  
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Re: Kaissiber Theoretical Competition
Reply #3 - 07/14/09 at 09:38:24
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Nomination #1, "The Equalizer line" by gewgaw
(Slightly edited for better readability, plus two analytical comments)

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2 Bxd2+ 8.Bxd2 Nxe4 9.d5 Ne7 10.Bb4
(a) 10.0–0 Nxd2 11.Qxd2 d6 12.Rac1 0–0 13.Rfe1  0.03/18  h6=
(b) 10.Bd3 Nxd2 11.Qxd2 d6 12.0–0 0–0 13.Rfe1 Nxd5 14.Bxh7+ Kxh7 15.Qxd5 Kg8 =+.
10...d6N 11.0–0 0–0 12.Re1.
[sb: As explained in the last post, this position isn't new.
So it seems more logical to consider the following move as gewgaw's nomination:]
12...a5


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13.Ba3
Probably Kramnik´s choice. Now ample possibilities for both sides, but black can hold, if he goes for bishophunting.
(a) 13.Rxe4 axb4 14.Qe1 (14.Qd2 Bf5 15.Ree1 c5 16.dxc6 Nxc6=) 14...Ng6 15.Qxb4 c5 (15...Bf5) 16.dxc6 bxc6 17.Bb3 (17.Re3 c5 18.Qd2 Be6 19.Bxe6 fxe6 20.Rxe6 d5=) 17...Qf6 (17...c5 18.Qd2=) 18.Rae1 Bf5= Mutual chances for both sides.(18...Bd7=; 18...c5=).
(b) 13.Bxa5 Nxf2 14.Qd2 Ng4 15.h3 Nf6 16.Bc3 Ng6=
(c) 13.Rxe4 axb4 14.Qd2 c5 15.dxc6 Nxc6=.
13...Nc5
(a) 13...Nf6 14.b3 Ng6 15.Bb2 a4 16.bxa4 c6 17.dxc6 bxc6 18.Rc1 c5 19.Ng5 Ba6 20.Bxf6 gxf6 21.Ne4 Bxc4 22.Rxc4 Re8 23.Qd5 f5 24.Qxa8 Qxa8 25.Nf6+ Kg7 26.Nxe8+ Kf8 27.Nf6 Ne5 28.Rf4 Kg7 29.Rxf5 Qxa4 =+.
(b) 13...Nf6 14.b3=
14.b3
[sb: White could postpone this move. For example 14.Qd2 b6 15.b3 Re8 16.Re3 (16.Bb2 Qd7 17.Nd4 Ba6 18.Ne6 f6 19.Qd4 Bxc4 20.Nxg7 looked good at first, but doesn't work: 20...Rf8 21.Nh5 Ba6 etc.) 16...Nf5 17.Rxe8+ Qxe8 18.Re1 Qf8 19.Bb5 Ba6 20.Bxa6 Nxa6 21.Qd3 g6 22.g4 Ng7 23.Bb2 with compensation.]
14...a4
14...Rb8 15.Qe2 Ng6 16.Bb2=.
15.b4
15.Bb2 axb3 16.axb3 Rxa1 17.Qxa1 f6=.
[sb: Trying to continue, I produced 18.Nd4 Ng6 19.Rd1 Bg4 20.f3 Bd7, and now (a) 21. Ne6 Bxe6 22.dxe6 Qe7 23.b4 b5! = and (b) 21.b4!? Ne5 22.Ba2 Ncd3 23.Ne6 Bxe6 24.dxe6 Qe7 25.Bxe5 Nxe5 26.f4, and the situation remains interesting.]
15...Nd7 16.Bb2 Nb6
16...a3.
17.Qd4 Nf5 18.Qf4 a3 19.Bc3 Nxc4
19...Ne7.
20.Qxc4 Bd7
20...b6.
21.b5 Rc8
21...Re8.
22.Qf4 =.
  
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Re: Kaissiber Theoretical Competition
Reply #2 - 07/14/09 at 06:40:01
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Thank you very much, gewgaw! So your nominated 10...d6 is meant to improve upon move 10 in the following game. It is in the PGN file, but I repeat some key games here - not everybody loves to use playing software.

Eduardo Saglione (2404) - Fabricio Iván Magallanes (2168)
Argentinian Corr. Championship (final) 2007
Comments: Stefan Bücker

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2! Bxd2+
By taking at first on d2, instead of the main move 7...Nxe4, Black seems to reduce his own options. But White's alternatives are also reduced, for example he can't take back on d2 with the knight. In most cases the text move will soon transpose to analyses in the gamefile POMTOW ATTACK 7...Nxe4 8. d5!.
8.Bxd2
8.Qxd2? [1–0, 23] Ivekovic,J-Racki,B, Busevec 2005 8...Nxe4 -/+; 8.Nxd2?! d5 (8...Nxd4? [1–0, 50] Crawford,B-Cornell,J, Detroit 1999 9.e5!) 9.exd5 Qe7+ 10.Kf1 Nxd4 is rather good for Black.
8...Nxe4
8...d5? 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Qb3 +/-.
9.d5
9.Qe2? [1–0, 39] Herrmann,J-Muehle,S, Neumuenster 1999 9...d5 -/+; 9.0–0? d5 10.Bd3 0–0 11.Be3? Bg4 -/+, Black has not only an extra pawn, but stands also much better, [0–1, 27] San Emeterio Cabanes,J-Laniella,I, Onati 1994.
9...Ne7 10.Bb4
10.0–0 Nxd2 11.Qxd2 0–0 [0–1, 23] Lahr,T-Dornhard,O, Pfeddersheim 1998, invites the advance 12.d6, so maybe 11...d6 is more precise, with a transposition to 7...Nxe4 8.d5 Ne7 9.0–0 Bxd2 10.Bxd2 Nxd2 11.Qxd2 d6, discussed in the file as our main line.
10...0–0
Here gewgaw nominates 10...d6 as an equalizer line. It should be noted, however, that his further analysis 11.0-0 0-0 12.Re1 returns to the Argentinian game by a transposition of moves. This means that gewgaw's 12...a5 is the real novelty. (Maybe his move-order is more precise, but to me it seems that this question is a side-issue here.)
In the analysis I had mentioned another alternative:
10...c5 11.dxc6 bxc6 12.0–0 += 0–0 (12...d5 13.Bd3) 13.Ne5 d6 14.Qe1 Bf5 15.Rd1.
11.0–0 d6
This position also arises in the main line file POMTOW ATTACK 7...Nxe4 8.d5! in the side-line 9...Bxd2 10.Bxd2 Nxd2 11. Qxd2. There are several alternatives, but this side-line seems nevertheless relevant for the Pomtow Attack - White gets compensation mainly because he has more space and active pieces. This game is a nice illustration for the lasting pressure which White exerts thanks to the great activity of his pieces.
12.Re1 Nc5
As mentioned above, 12...a5!? is gewgaw's novelty.
13.Qd2
13.h3 gave White sufficient compensation in the other file POMTOW ATTACK 7...Nxe4 8.d5!, after the further moves 13...b6 14.Bc3 a5 15.Qd2 Bd7 16.b3 Ng6 17.Bb2 Re8 18.Rxe8+ Bxe8 19.Re1, with compensation.
13...b6 14.Bc3 Bd7 15.Nd4

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An ideal position for a knight. From here it "controls" eight legal moves of black minor pieces...
15...a5 16.g3
The first of three quiet, but powerful pawn moves which systematically restrict the opponent's options.
16...Re8 17.h4! Qc8 18.h5!
Only a few moves later this pawn will even advance to h6.
18...Nf5 19.Nxf5 Rxe1+ 20.Rxe1 Bxf5 21.h6! Qd7 22.Qf4 Bg6 23.Bxg7 Qf5 24.Qd4

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24...Qg5 25.Re3 Bh5 26.Bb5 f5 27.f4 Qg6 28.Kg2 Qf7 29.Re6! c6 30.Bxc6 Rc8 31.Re3 Bg4 32.b3 Rb8 33.Bb5 Ne4 34.Qc4 Qe7 35.Bc3 Kf7 36.Qd4 Rg8 37.Bd3 Kf8 38.Bxe4 fxe4 39.Rxe4 Qd8 40.f5 Qg5 41.Rxg4 Qxg4 42.Qf6+ 1–0
  
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Re: Kaissiber Theoretical Competition
Reply #1 - 07/13/09 at 18:40:05
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#1 - Nomination 10. ...d6 – Equalizer line[C54]

Giuoco Piano: 4 c3 Nf6, main lines with 5 d4 and 5 d3C54: Giuoco Piano: 4 c3 Nf6, main lines with 5 d4 and 5 d3 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2 Bxd2+ 8.Bxd2 Nxe4 9.d5 Ne7 10.Bb4 [10.0–0 Nxd2 11.Qxd2 d6 12.Rac1 0–0 13.Rfe1  h6=; 10.Bd3 Nxd2 11.Qxd2 d6 12.0–0 0–0 13.Rfe1 Nxd5 14.Bxh7+ Kxh7 15.Qxd5 Kg8³] 10...d6N 11.0–0 0–0 12.Re1 a5 13.Ba3 Probably Kramnik´s choice. Now ample possibilities for both sides, but black can hold, if he goes for bishophunting. [13.Rxe4 axb4 14.Qe1 (14.Qd2 Bf5 15.Ree1 c5 16.dxc6 Nxc6=) 14...Ng6 15.Qxb4 c5 (15...Bf5) 16.dxc6 bxc6 17.Bb3 (17.Re3 c5 18.Qd2 Be6 19.Bxe6 fxe6 20.Rxe6 d5=) 17...Qf6 (17...c5 18.Qd2=) 18.Rae1 Bf5= Mutual chances for both sides.(18...Bd7=; 18...c5=) ; 13.Bxa5 Nxf2 14.Qd2 Ng4 15.h3 Nf6 16.Bc3 Ng6=; 13.Rxe4 axb4 14.Qd2 c5 15.dxc6 Nxc6=] 13...Nc5 [13...Nf6 14.b3 Ng6 15.Bb2 a4 16.bxa4 c6 17.dxc6 bxc6 18.Rc1 c5 19.Ng5 Ba6 20.Bxf6 gxf6 21.Ne4 Bxc4 22.Rxc4 Re8 23.Qd5 f5 24.Qxa8 Qxa8 25.Nf6+ Kg7 26.Nxe8+ Kf8 27.Nf6 Ne5 28.Rf4 Kg7 29.Rxf5 Qxa4³; 13...Nf6 14.b3=] 14.b3 a4 [14...Rb8 15.Qe2 Ng6 16.Bb2=] 15.b4 [15.Bb2 axb3 16.axb3 Rxa1 17.Qxa1 f6=] 15...Nd7 16.Bb2 Nb6 [16...a3 ] 17.Qd4 Nf5 18.Qf4 a3 19.Bc3 Nxc4 [19...Ne7] 20.Qxc4 Bd7 [20...b6] 21.b5 Rc8 [21...Re8] 22.Qf4=
« Last Edit: 07/14/09 at 09:32:02 by gewgaw »  

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C54: Kaissiber Competition: Pomtow Attack
07/13/09 at 01:23:09
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Second Kaissiber Competition: The Pomtow Attack (Italian Game)

Post a new idea, which improves upon the existing theory of the following variation, in this thread up till August 12th, 2009.
The best theoretical novelty wins a full set of Kaissiber (issues 1-34). Further prizes: three subscriptions for Kaissiber issues 34-37.

The topic of the competition is: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.c3 Nf6 5.d4 exd4 6.cxd4 Bb4+ 7.Nbd2:

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About the topic:
The old position after 6…Bb4+ is still extremely popular, with about 6000 games in the database. It goes back to the days of Greco (17th century). His 7.Nc3 often led to spectacular games. Steinitz tried to improve the concept, in 1898 a Danish theoretician became famous (in the chess world) by developing his Möller Attack, 7.Nc3 Nxe4 8.0-0 Bxc3 9.d5!?. Today it is still a famous example for romantic opening play, but only very few people claim that White might have an advantage, most books assess the position as roughly equal or even as =+. The alternatives 7.Bd2 and the rare Krakov Variation 7.Kf1 may be slightly better, but both are assessed only as = in recent opening works. – A fourth move is 7.Nbd2, the topic of our second theoretical competition. It is even rarer than the Krakov Variation 7.Kf1, but in my (= Stefan Bücker’s) opinion the move is underestimated. The stem game Dr. Pomtow – Schallopp won’t convince anybody, but the most interesting development since 1862, when Dr. Pomtow played the move 7.Nbd2, are two games played by the 31 year old Russian GM Dmitry Chuprov (Elo 2577) against strong opposition. We can perhaps agree that a GM usually doesn’t blunder a pawn in move 7, or at least he wouldn’t repeat such a blunder in a second game. So we can assume that Chuprov didn’t fear the reply 7…Nxe4. But does he see an advantage for White? Try to find it out by yourself.

Rules:
Forum members are invited to post (= nominate) their proposal (only one per member) in this thread of the competition, up till August 12th, 2009. To make it clear that a concrete move (or perhaps a plan) is nominated, please highlight the word "nomination” in your post. It should be an idea that improves either White’s or Black’s chances over the existing theory, as presented in the pgn file of the competition. It is possible to withdraw a nomination and then nominate something else. It may be an unknown or underestimated game (not necessarily played by the member himself), or a new idea, accompanied by short analysis. To make it easier to study the Pomtow Attack, there is a pgn file available for download that contains relevant games and additional analyses (by Stefan Bücker). If you detect other printed material regarding 7.Nbd2, please publish it in the thread of the competition. There will be an additional prize for the “best research”, consisting of 10 additional issues of Kaissiber (this prize may be split, if more than one member have relevant information).



The Two Threads:

The (main) thread of the competition is for nominations and valuable information on the topic. But in the first competition this thread became very “dense”, and to see all the nominated ideas, one had to read a lot of other comments. Therefore this time we will have a second thread (to keep the overview in the main thread) for anything else related to the competition: chat, refutations (while forced refutations may well belong into the main thread, too), proposals for the next competition, etc. If nominated analysis seems flawed, other members should comment, thus making it improbable that an incorrect idea could finally triumph. In the first days of the competition, I intend to participate in the dialog (especially if there are claims that White’s concept can be easily refuted), but later the discussion about the variations and nominated ideas will be left to the other members. It would be great if a lively discussion could arise. Other comments are also welcome, as in any other thread, and nobody will mind if you want to reveal a rescue for the Möller Attack. But that should appear in the second thread, not in the first.



The most interesting ideas will be pre-selected (by Stefan Bücker), the winners will then be crowned through a poll, held from August 13th to 24th. The members will be asked to vote in this poll and decide which of the ideas has the highest practical value – one member, one vote.
« Last Edit: 07/17/11 at 04:16:28 by Smyslov_Fan »  

Competition_Pomtow_Attack.pgn ( 17 KB | 108 Downloads )
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