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Normal Topic C03,C10-C11: Guide for playing rubinstein french (Read 4236 times)
emary
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Re: Guide for playing the rubinstein french
Reply #8 - 02/12/10 at 16:51:17
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"McDonald: How to play against 1.e4" is a good starting point for the Fort Knox. He covers some
examples to demonstrate what could go wrong for Black too.
To play the Fort Knox sucessfully you need a lot of patience! But your opponent will need some patience too, if he wants to beat you  Wink
  
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Re: Guide for playing the rubinstein french
Reply #7 - 02/10/10 at 21:00:03
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Ronens videos are really good. Look also panov and Sic with bb5
  
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Re: Guide for playing the rubinstein french
Reply #6 - 01/22/10 at 03:18:54
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Hi,

Iff you are a ICC member, then GM Ronen Har-Zvi has made a 7 video series on the rubinstein on chess.fm. It is very thorough and very informative. The rubinstein is quite a complex little system.
  
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knightmare
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Re: Guide for playing the rubinstein french
Reply #5 - 01/11/10 at 15:40:58
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To be honest, I think you should choose something more "fighting". IMHO there is only one motivation to stick to a new opening: victories. Short ones, brutal ones, hard ones ... but victories.
In the Rubinstein you only get the third of the possibilities mentioned above.
If you're young, it's even harder as in the majority of cases you'll win in the endgame with the Rubinstein. Hardly something that is interesting for young people (usually). And usually not the phase of the game where youngsters are good.
  

ELO 2060. Corr.: 2190. Which casts doubts if I ever knew what I was doing. At least on the Board.
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Re: Guide for playing the rubinstein french
Reply #4 - 01/08/10 at 21:51:34
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study the games of Georg Meier. Young german GM with ELO 2658. He loves to play this stuff and it works very well for him.
  
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dom
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Re: Guide for playing the rubinstein french
Reply #3 - 01/04/10 at 22:59:40
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A starting point for Rubinstein....

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 (3.Nc3 is better if White is a Diemer addict and wants to play 3...dxe4 4.f3) dxe4 4.Nxe4

Sometimes Black waits the Bg5 move before playing this exchange, it's Burn line. Idea for Black is to exchange some pieces.

Now Black has four or five systems

A) 4...Nd7 main line
B) 4...Bd7 Fort Knox
C) 4...Be7 waiting move
D) 4...Qd5 Katalymov
and
E) 4...Nc6 offbeat but maybe for players of "Nc6 vs everyline".


A) 4....Nd7 main line

Move has two purposes: one is to develop knight g8 on natural square f6 and another one is to control e5.

{ 4...Nf6 ?! 5.Nxf6+! gxf6 6.Nf3 gives a small positional advantage to White because Black has to delay the c5 freeing move and develop  first.: 6...c5 7.Be3 Thorsteinsson-Gunnarsson,Reykjavik 1976 (Khalifman);

  4...b6?! move disappeared after game Tal-Holmov,Moscow 1975}

5.Nf3 Ngf6 { 5...Be7 6.g3!? or 6.c4!? ; 5...Ngf6 6.Bg5 Be7 7.Nxf6 Nxf6 8.Bc4 oo 9.Qe2 b6 10.ooo Spassky-Zakharov,Sochi 1966 (Psakhis) ; 5...b6 6.Bb5! Nf6 7.Bc6 ; 5...h6 6.Bd3 Ngf6 7.Nxf6 and then 7...Nxf6 Spielmann vs L'Hermet, 1927  or 7...Qxf6 8.Qe2 Bd6 9.oo and Black king is unsafe on kingside (Khalifman) }

6.Nxf6 { 6.Bg5 h6! 7.Nxf6 Nxf6  and now 8.Bh4 classical main line 8...Be7 9.Bc4 c5 10.Qe2 g5 11.Bg3 Qa5+ 12.c3 += or 8.Be3!? see analysis Alexander Finkel CBM 108 or 8.Bxf6 Qxf6 9.Bb5+ c6 10.Bd3 Bd7!? Korchnoi plan to play like in CaroKann with long castle Svidler-Kortchnoi,Biel 2001 is the "anti-Anand line" Topalov-Bareev,tournament NAO-Caissa Cannes 2002 and Anand-Ivanchuk,Amber Monte Carlo 2004 }

6...Nxf6 {6...gxf6 7.Bf4!?} 7.Bd3 { 7.Bg5!? h6! 8.Bh4! c5?!  9.Bb5+ because light square bishop has not moved to d3, this check is best move Bd7 10.Bxd7 Qxd7 11.Qe2 cxd4 12.ooo Bc5 13.Qe5!? a plan played in modern times by Gurevich  but already seen in  Parma-Petrosian,Vinkovci 1970  ,  Macieja-Laznicka,Khanty Mansiysk 2007 (chesspublishing, update decembre 2007) Anand-Gurevich,Bastia 2004 (Dom) and here Kavalek gives 13...Rc8!? ; or 8.Be3!? a6 with the idea to play b6-Bb7 occured in  Shirov-Gurevich,Reykjavik 2003 ; 7.c3 Qd5!? (Dom) instead of 7...c5 8.Ne5! Kasparov line Kasparov-Ponomariov,Linares 2002 ; 7.Ne5 Capablanca Nd7 Reti-Mieses, 1920 8.Bf4 c5!? Bezgodov,Zakharevich,Russie 2000 ; 7.Be3 Nd5 8.Bd2 c5= Vaisser }

7...c5 { 7...Be7 8.c3!? c5 9.oo cxd4 10.Nxd4 Tsehskovsky-Kholmov,Akmola 1993 (McDonald and Harley)  oo 11.Bf4 += because White has easy play for his bishops pair }

8.dxc5 { 8.oo cxd4 9.Nxd4 Bc5!?  10.Nb3 Bd6 11.Qf3 Qc7 12.h3 Bd7 13.Nd4 Be5 14.Nb5 Qb8 15.Re1 a6  16.Nc3 += Kuzmin-Chernin,Irkutsk 1983 } Qa5!? 9.c3 Qxc5 10.oo Be7 11.Qe2 oo 12.Bg5 Rd8! 13.Ne5 h6


B) 4...Bd7 Fort Knox

5.Nf3 { 5.c4!? Bc6 6.Nc3 Nf6 7.Nf3 Bxf3 Karpatchev-Foisor Bischwiller 1999 ; 5.Bg5 Be7 Quezada-Chemin, 2005 ; 5.Be2 Bc6 Vokler-Kramnik,Groningue 1991 } Bc6

6.Bd3 { 6.Neg5 Be7! A Planinc vs Bukic, 1978 ; 6.Qd3 Smyslov Nd7 7.Be2 Be7 8.c4!? Bxe4 9.Qxe4 c6! 10.oo Ngf6 11.Qc2 oo 12.Bd2 Re8= (Psakhis) ; 6.Ned2 Nd7 7.Bd3 Ne7 } Bxe4 gives bishop pair but Black has solid position 7.Bxe4 c6 8.oo Nf6 9.Bd3 Be7 10.c4 Qc7 11.b3 += White has space advantage and play on both wings


C) 4...Be7 waiting move

5.Nf3 { 5.Bd3 Nd7 6.Qe2 Legky Ngf6 7.Nxf6!? Nxf6 8.Nf3 Capablanca-Chajes,New York 1918 (Daubar) and here Psakhis gives main dangerous plan for White is long castle 8...oo 9.oo c5 10.dxc5 Bxc5 11.Bg5 += } Nd7

6.Bd3 { or 6.g3!? Ngf6 7.Nxf6 Bxf6 8.Bg2 oo 9.oo e5 10.Be3 +=  Motwani-Hempson,Blackpool 1988 (Psakhis) } Ngf6 7.Qe2! c5  8.Nxf6 Nxf6 9.dxc5 Qa5+ 10.c3 Qxc5 11.Bg5 Bd7! 12.Ne5 Bc6 13.h4 Rd8 14.ooo Spassky-Petrosian,1966 (Suetin)

D) 4...Qd5 Katalymov "neo-Rubinstein"

5.Bd3 Nc6 6.Nf3 to forbid counterplay with e5 6...Nf6 7.Nxf6 gxf6 8.Bf4! Bd7 9.c4!? Qa5+ 10.Bd2 Qh5 11.Qe2 ooo 12.ooo= Kuzmin,A-Muratov,V/Moscow 1988

E) 4...Nc6 offbeat

5.Bb5 {5.c3 Qd5 6.Bd2 e5! 7.Qe2 Be6 8.Nf3 exd4 9.oo ooo Mitkov-Sulava,Kladovo 1991 (Khalifman) or 5.Nf3 Qd5 6.Bd3 Nf6 7.Nxf6 gxf6 8.Bf4 see D) } Qd5

6.Qe2!? Garcia-Panno,Buenos Aires 1971 (Eingorn)



  

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dom
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Re: Guide for playing the rubinstein french
Reply #2 - 01/04/10 at 12:05:36
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In thread "French in Russian Super Final" you have one Rubinstein game.

It's about one "fashion" move Be3
  

“Learn from the mistakes of others. You can never live long enough to make them all yourself.”  - Groucho Marx
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dom
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Re: Guide for playing the rubinstein french
Reply #1 - 01/04/10 at 12:00:49
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Yes, Rubinstein and Burn variation seems to have less coverage than other lines.

In other post, somebody asked for the Exchange.... Not so much top players play the French, hence coverage of top fashion variations limit the opportunities to recall how to play some lines.

Books exist (of course) but not only specialized in the Rubinstein. I like very much some Psakhis's books and Jussupow explanations in one Europe Echecs paper, for comments about the line.

It's worth to work about Bareev's games as Black...not too many won games for Bareev  Roll Eyes ... but very interesting.

As usual, maybe it's useful to limit at first work to some specific lines, like Fort Knox,..., not because McDonald likes it a lot ... but because you see one idea about how to deal with the "bad" bishop.

...and I can post here some of my data for starting point if you wish...  Smiley
  

“Learn from the mistakes of others. You can never live long enough to make them all yourself.”  - Groucho Marx
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battleangel
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C03,C10-C11: Guide for playing rubinstein french
01/03/10 at 17:21:18
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Hello,

I am planning to incorporate the french into my repertoire, I plan to play the rubinstein french, but I don't see any guide on it, there are no books, also chesspublishing does not seem to cover it in 2009?
« Last Edit: 07/23/11 at 17:11:23 by dom »  
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