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Normal Topic h-pawn hack (Read 2937 times)
RdC
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Re: h-pawn hack
Reply #3 - 07/20/11 at 13:25:20
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Vass wrote on 07/20/11 at 12:09:43:
While 1. d4 g6 2. h4 is best met by the natural 2... Nf6


Julian Hodgson went for 3 Bg5 transposing more or less back into a Tromp in his last round game with Norwood in the 1991 British. That was the game where Norwood had to give up his queen on c1 for a rook and bishop.

It seems to me that if Black is going to adopt systems based on playing .. g6, .. Bg7 and .. c5, that lines against players who will punt early h file attacks are needed. Wasn't a recent book  missing on these? It may be the case that they are positionally dubious (but that's a judgement call), but it doesn't help if you are faced with them over the board.
  
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JamesH
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Re: h-pawn hack
Reply #2 - 07/20/11 at 13:02:42
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The logical "textbook" principal of playing in the center after play on the wing should lead to equality, so 1.e4 g6 2.h4 d5 followed by Nf6 etc.

But to be honest I think that most white players will wait for black to play ...d6 so black is a tempo down on the aforementioned lines e.g. 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 and now 3...d6 is needed for the standard pirc setup, unless black is planning on playing a different style completely, such as 3...c6 or 3...c5.

Although if your playing a faster time control or simply dont want to give white the prospect of pushing further, you could play ...h5 when both players can try and utilise the g4 +g5 squares, but this is unclear.
  

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Vass
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Re: h-pawn hack
Reply #1 - 07/20/11 at 12:09:43
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Imho, the second player has to establish such move order to a known setup that would allow him to enter in familiar waters using the weakening of the white position after this early h2-h4 move. For example:
1. e4 g6 2. h4 d5!? for a Scandinavian setup where g4 may be useful for Bc8-g4 move later. (I, for one, would play 1. e4 g6 2. h4 d5 3. exd5 Nf6 where Bc8-g4 will be decisive at least for equality.)
The Alekhine player may continue with 2... Nf6! i.e. 1. e4 g6 2. h4 Nf6 3. e5 Nd5 (or 3... Nh5!? 4. d4 d6 5. g4 Ng7 6. exd6 cxd6 7. h5 gxh5 8. gxh5 Nf5 9. Nf3 Bg7 with =/unclear) 4. c4 Nb6 5. d4 d6 6. h5!? dxe5! and so on..
While 1. d4 g6 2. h4 is best met by the natural 2... Nf6 because of 3. Nc3 d5!? and if 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Bf4 c5!? 6. dxc5!? 0-0 and Nbd7/Na6, Qa5 or so..
As for the 1 e4 g6 2 d4 Bg7 3 h4 setup I will reccomend 3... d5!? 4. e5 c5!? as per Nimzo's centre counter attack on a flank activity.
But firstly, the second player has to be calm (and indomitable).  Wink
  
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h-pawn hack
07/20/11 at 01:58:00
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Any suggestions on how Black should meet 1 e4 g6 2 h4 or 1 d4 g6 2 h4 or 1 e4 g6 2 d4 Bg7 3 h4   ?

This is from a British viewpoint where such systems have been punted by GMs Julian Hodgson and Simon Williams as attempts  to blow the opposition off the board.

  
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