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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Lakdawala modern (Read 23038 times)
Paul Brondal
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #35 - 11/24/16 at 12:35:47
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In The Modern Tiger, the following 5th move is recommended for black: 1. e4 g6 2. d4 Lg7 3. Sc3 d6 4. Le3 a6 5.Dd2 b5. He uses quite a bit of time explaining why he now prefers this to Sd7. It is really an excellent book! I'm reading the entire book with over 100 games and loads of analysis and it is very entertaining and he has really good explanations for a lot of the strategy. I immensely enjoy his treatment of the Averbakh variation.
  
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Michael Ayton
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #34 - 07/21/16 at 14:43:07
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"Bump" -- anyone got any thoughts? I was hoping Carlsen's recent defeat of Wei Yi (or Why-aye, as we say here in the North-East) might have inspired some new enthusiasm for the Modern ...
  
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Michael Ayton
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #33 - 06/30/16 at 11:26:50
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Glenn Snow wrote:
Quote:
I did find [lines after 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.Be3 a6 where White plays h2-h4 without an early f2-f3] analyzed ... starting on page 47 where he gives 9...e6!, a move not mentioned by Tiger.


Is this the line 5 Qd2 Nd7 6 h4 h5 7 Nh3 b5 8 Ng5 Bb7 9 0-0-0 (given '!' by Tiger's 1st edition) e6 10 f3 Ngf6, as in Dunis-Sulava? -- a line also reachable via other move orders including, here, 8 f3 Bb7 9 Ng5 Ngf6 10 0-0-0 e6!? (played here, I presume, on the basis that Tiger's original 9 ...0-0 doesn't work because of 10 g4!).

Can anyone tell me, is it still thought that after 4 Be3 a6 the lines with h2-h4 and not f2-f3 represent the biggest danger to Black, and if so is there any consensus on what's best for each side? After 5 Qd2 Nd7 6 h4 h5 7 Nh3 b5, as well as Dunis-Sulava there's also: (1) 8 Ng5 Bb7 9 a4 c6 10 f3 Ngf6 11 Be2 0-0 12 0-0 Qc7 (the ancient game Ciocaltea-Andersson!); (2) 8 Ng5 Bb7 9 0-0-0 e6 10 f4!? Nh6 11 Bd3 Nf6 (Crosa-Peralta); and (3) 8 0-0-0 Bb7 9 f3!? Rc8 10 Ng5 c5 11 e5 cd 12 e6 fe 13 Bd4 e5 14 Be3 Qa5 (Iriarte-Ott), which looks wild and perhaps dangerous. In all these lines, there are the usual mind-boggling transpositions that you need a flow-chart to get to grips with!

Also, is 6 h4 h6 still(?) under a cloud? I'm wondering about, for example, 7 0-0-0 b5 8 f4 b4!? 9 Nce2 Ngf6 10 Ng3 Ng4!?, followed by ...c5.

  
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #32 - 03/07/13 at 16:06:31
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Bibs wrote on 03/07/13 at 12:38:52:

Half remember that this might have some ideas:
http://www.abebooks.co.uk/modern-Defence-Hort-Vlastimil-Press/1638833557/bd
but that is a distant memory, don't have here to check. Kylemeister is the historian. K?


Can't recall about that one; on the history front I think of Soltis advocating the Gurgenidze 20 years ago ("Black to play and win with 1...g6").  And maybe David Norwood's Modern book had some Gurg-related stuff?

Incidentally, thinking about this reminds me of a basic issue from way back re Fischer-Petrosian as to whether g3 is needed to stop ...h4; Keene and Botterill in their Modern book thought (to the contrary of Trifunovic and, it would seem, Fischer) that it isn't.
« Last Edit: 03/07/13 at 17:30:51 by kylemeister »  
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #31 - 03/07/13 at 15:29:54
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Seams like I will wait for update of Tigers book... Modern Tiger...
  
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Seeley
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #30 - 03/07/13 at 13:29:55
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Bibs wrote on 03/07/13 at 13:10:25:
Ah yes, that too. A very lazy, skimpy book that though. Poor.

Agreed: the book is a bit disappointing, in general. However the Gurgenidze chapters do contain a few useful discussions of strategical ideas, which might be of interest.
  
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Bibs
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #29 - 03/07/13 at 13:10:25
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Seeley wrote on 03/07/13 at 13:01:40:
Bibs wrote on 03/07/13 at 12:38:52:
Ratzi wrote on 03/07/13 at 06:28:43:
Hi, does the book cover 3...c6 (including Gurgenidze)? I could't find that in the index of variations viewable at Amazon. And, if not, what would be the best source? Regards.


No Gurgenidze, no.
Best for that?
None that I know of recently.
Half remember that this might have some ideas:
http://www.abebooks.co.uk/modern-Defence-Hort-Vlastimil-Press/1638833557/bd

Modern Defence (Speelman and McDonald, Everyman, 2000) has a couple of chapters on the Gurgenidze and is a bit more up to date than the Hort book suggested by Bibs. Even so, it's more than a decade old. I have no idea how much theory has changed in this line, so it might suit your needs.

Ah yes, that too. A very lazy, skimpy book that though. Poor.
  
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Seeley
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #28 - 03/07/13 at 13:01:40
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Bibs wrote on 03/07/13 at 12:38:52:
Ratzi wrote on 03/07/13 at 06:28:43:
Hi, does the book cover 3...c6 (including Gurgenidze)? I could't find that in the index of variations viewable at Amazon. And, if not, what would be the best source? Regards.


No Gurgenidze, no.
Best for that?
None that I know of recently.
Half remember that this might have some ideas:
http://www.abebooks.co.uk/modern-Defence-Hort-Vlastimil-Press/1638833557/bd

Modern Defence (Speelman and McDonald, Everyman, 2000) has a couple of chapters on the Gurgenidze and is a bit more up to date than the Hort book suggested by Bibs. Even so, it's more than a decade old. I have no idea how much theory has changed in this line, so it might suit your needs.
  
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Bibs
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #27 - 03/07/13 at 12:38:52
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Ratzi wrote on 03/07/13 at 06:28:43:
Hi, does the book cover 3...c6 (including Gurgenidze)? I could't find that in the index of variations viewable at Amazon. And, if not, what would be the best source? Regards.


No Gurgenidze, no.
Best for that?
None that I know of recently.
Half remember that this might have some ideas:
http://www.abebooks.co.uk/modern-Defence-Hort-Vlastimil-Press/1638833557/bd
but that is a distant memory, don't have here to check. Kylemeister is the historian. K?
Tough line to play though, I learned through bitter experience.

  
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #26 - 03/07/13 at 06:28:43
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Hi, does the book cover 3...c6 (including Gurgenidze)? I could't find that in the index of variations viewable at Amazon. And, if not, what would be the best source? Regards.
  
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #25 - 02/21/13 at 07:47:27
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Fllg wrote on 02/20/13 at 16:11:50:
Glenn Snow wrote on 02/20/13 at 06:27:26:
Would you be willing to share the "various places" in the book that you found superficial?


Hi Glenn,

from memory:

1. After 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.Be3 a6 there is nothing about lines where White plays h2-h4 without an early f2-f3

2. There is not even a mention of 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.f4 a6 5.Nf3 b5 6.Bd3 Nd7 7.a4 which has been recommended by Greet in Beating unusual openings, a book that is listed in the bibliography

3. In the chapter about the Averbakh he gives a main game with 1.d4 g6 2.c4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.e4 e5 5.Nge2 Nc6 6.Be3 Nh6 7.f3 f5 8.d5 Ne7 9.Qd2 Nf7 10.g3. The dangerous 10.0-0-0 is relegated to a side note and answered with 10... f4 which is in my opinion clearly inferior to 10... 0-0.

When reading the book it seemed to me he often referred to "King´s Indian style play" without ever explaining what that means as if that is common sense for someone reading a Move by Move book.

Above that I clearly share Bibs´ opinion about the writing style. I found it difficult to extract the chess content which was interesting to me. If the book were reduced to that it could easily be half the size.


Thanks very much for listing those.  I did find #1 analyzed at least some starting on page 47 where he gives 9...e6!, a move not mentioned by Tiger.

As for his writing style, well I tend to agree although my feelings aren't as strong as yours and others.  I do wish he'd tone it down a bit at least.
  
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #24 - 02/20/13 at 18:38:51
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Bibs wrote on 02/20/13 at 12:26:58:
I must say that Lakdawala's writing style is intensely irritating.
Everything is a simile. Hideous ones at that. Profoundly irritating, so much so that it actively distracts from the chess content.
I cannot think of a worse chess writer stylistically. Lays waste to Keene. Puts the boot into Moody. Leaves Taylor at the starting line.
Everyman - no editor?


Leaves Taylor at the starting line?  Ouch.  I thought his Slav book was pretty good for the intended audience, though it's the only one I've seen.

Funny thing is, Lakdawala has a degree in English, if I recall correctly.  Hmmm.
  
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #23 - 02/20/13 at 16:11:50
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Glenn Snow wrote on 02/20/13 at 06:27:26:
Would you be willing to share the "various places" in the book that you found superficial?


Hi Glenn,

from memory:

1. After 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.Be3 a6 there is nothing about lines where White plays h2-h4 without an early f2-f3

2. There is not even a mention of 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.f4 a6 5.Nf3 b5 6.Bd3 Nd7 7.a4 which has been recommended by Greet in Beating unusual openings, a book that is listed in the bibliography

3. In the chapter about the Averbakh he gives a main game with 1.d4 g6 2.c4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.e4 e5 5.Nge2 Nc6 6.Be3 Nh6 7.f3 f5 8.d5 Ne7 9.Qd2 Nf7 10.g3. The dangerous 10.0-0-0 is relegated to a side note and answered with 10... f4 which is in my opinion clearly inferior to 10... 0-0.

When reading the book it seemed to me he often referred to "King´s Indian style play" without ever explaining what that means as if that is common sense for someone reading a Move by Move book.

Above that I clearly share Bibs´ opinion about the writing style. I found it difficult to extract the chess content which was interesting to me. If the book were reduced to that it could easily be half the size.
  
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dfan
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #22 - 02/20/13 at 14:33:16
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Yeah, some people dig his hyper writing style but it's hard for me to handle. I find myself wincing every few sentences.
  
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Re: Lakdawala modern
Reply #21 - 02/20/13 at 12:26:58
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I must say that Lakdawala's writing style is intensely irritating.
Everything is a simile. Hideous ones at that. Profoundly irritating, so much so that it actively distracts from the chess content.
I cannot think of a worse chess writer stylistically. Lays waste to Keene. Puts the boot into Moody. Leaves Taylor at the starting line.
Everyman - no editor?
  
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