Latest Updates:
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 [2] 3 
Topic Tools
Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed) (Read 17858 times)
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1768
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #25 - 06/30/17 at 10:01:43
Post Tools
Good point about move orders, yes! (In a sense that was one reason I mentioned 10 Bf4, just because Black has always to beware of allowing an immediate 'game-over' e4-e5!)

Maybe the Dominguez-Ponomariov setup is, for ordinary mortals, not too bad? I seem to recall Lakdawala in his book on the Modern citing with approval a similar game where Sulava (if I'm remembering right) was Black. I'd take Tiger's expertise over Lakdawala's any day of the week, but temperamentally Tiger always fearlessly chooses the super-sharpest options, which might not always be the best policy for a patzer like me! ...
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
picasso911
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


Winning by pinning

Posts: 14
Joined: 06/19/17
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #24 - 06/29/17 at 19:26:44
Post Tools
Michael Ayton wrote on 06/27/17 at 14:42:49:
I do wish though that openings books in general were more cogently organised!


Agreed! After 1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.Be3 a6 5.Qd2 b5 the following moves for White f3, 0-0-0 and h4 are interchangeable but not necessarily lead to the same "tabiya".

All these move-orders are very confusing (at least to me Grin ), especially since Tiger introduces his own move-order issues with Black in terms of 5...Nd7 vs. 5...Bb7.

Michael Ayton wrote on 06/27/17 at 14:42:49:
For example, in Chapter 3, Tiger comments rather differently on the same position in different places (4 Be3 a6 5 h4 Nf6 6 f3 b5 7 Qd2 h5 8 0-0-0 Bb7?! 9 Nh3 Nbd7 10 Ng5 e6: compare bottom right of p. 162 and bottom left of p. 176, where 11 Ne2 is called critical though the book’s first edition implies that 11 g3, which it seems has a big plus score, is actually best).


Well spotted! This indeed seems to be kind of an oversight.
After the critical 10...e6 11.g3!? Qe7 12.Bh3 Nb6 13.b3 Nfd7 14.Ne2 0-0-0!? (Dominguez - Ponomariov, 2014) Black might face a slight pressure.

Michael Ayton wrote on 06/27/17 at 14:42:49:
Also (and of greater interest to me), the move orders 5 Qd2 b5 6 f3 Nd7 7 h4 h5 8 Nh3 Bb7 9 a4 and 9 Ng5 (9 0-0-0 Rc8 10 Ng5 c5! is the variation you mention, of course) are missing. After the former Black presumably should play 9 …c6 reaching page 158 after 10 Ng5 Ngf6 11 Be2 0-0, and after the latter perhaps 9 …c6 too, reaching page 156 after 10 0-0-0 Qc7! 11 Kb1 Ngf6.


After 6.f3 Nd7 7.h4 h5!? 8.Nh3 Bb7 9.Ng5 Black also can play a 9...Ngf6 10.0-0-0 e6, transposing to the lines discussed above (they might not be the best though). Noteworthy, 10.0-0-0 c6? allows the thematic 11.e5! and Black already is in trouble. These move-order-errors have to be avoided!
After 9...c6 White of course isn't oblige to play 10.0-0-0 as well as 11.Kb1 (which tanspose), although it seems quite sensible.

Michael Ayton wrote on 06/27/17 at 14:42:49:
In addition, in the ‘waiting game’ variation that you mention, given on p. 163 (6 h4 Nf6! 7 f3 h5 8 0-0-0 c6 9 Kb1! Qc7!), I think the sharp 10 Bf4!? should have been analysed, even if 10 …b4 is OK for Black.


Of course, in a repertoire book you cannot really take every normal move into account and the Bf4-idea appears quite seldom in these type of positions, although it's logical. After 10.Bf4 b4 (10...Be6!? was played once by Sethuraman) 11.Na4 a5 12.Bc4 Ba6 Black seemingly is doing well.

And thank you for listing a few model games for the quite different ..h6-setup, I included some lines in my notes, waiting for the chance testing them!  Wink

Very intriguing discussion!  Smiley
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1768
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #23 - 06/29/17 at 00:33:28
Post Tools
Quote:
The alternative (and maybe more risky) setup against White's h4 is ...h6, intending to meet h4-h5 with ...g5, however creating a hole on f5 (as ...e6 usually weakens d6 a bit too much) and a potential pawn-break in f4.

Maybe it’s a personal thing, but I myself think of the …h6 lines as less risky than the …h5 ones, partly ’cos I’m scared of that Ng5 and partly ’cos I reckon plans with f2–f4 are not likely to be White’s strongest. Tiger’s book touches on …h6 lines rather than analysing them exhaustively and I think you have to extrapolate a bit from what he says to achieve a complete ‘repertoire’, but maybe the games below sum up the key lines? As usual the possible transpositions are legion, so I’ve tweaked the move orders (grouping them all under 6 h4 h6) to present the lines mentioned as clearly as possible.

What is White's strongest line against [6] ...h6? I've seen it implicitly suggested that it might be the line played in the daft game Hoehne–Winbush, but maybe that's unlikely? Anyway,  I look forward to comments/thoughts!

*****

Haubro–Tiger

1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. Be3 a6 5. Qd2 b5 6. h4 h6 7. O-O-O Nd7 8. f3 Bb7 9. Nh3 Ngf6 10. Kb1 [Also 10. g4, 10. Nf4, 10. Nf2] Nb6 11. g4 b4 12. Ne2 Nc4 13. Qc1 Nd7 14. Bf2 a5 15. Ng3 Ndb6 16. h5 g5 17. Nf5 Bf8 18. d5 c5 19. f4 f6 20. Ne3 Ne3 21. Qe3 Bg7 22. Bb5 Kf7 23. Rdf1 Kg8 24. f5 a4 25. Rc1 Kh7 26. a3 ba3 27. Qa3 Nd7 28. Bd7 Qd7 29. Rhd1 Rhb8 30. c4 Ba6 31. Rd3 Rb4 32. Rdc3 Rab8 33. Ng1 e6 34. Nf3 ed5 35. ed5 Qe7 36. Re1 Qb7 37. Rc2 Rb3 38. Qa4 Rf3 39. Re6 Rb3 40. Rd6 Rb2 41. Kc1 Rc2 42. Qc2 Bc4 0-1



Either … De Costa–Van de Berkmortel

1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. Be3 a6 5. Qd2 b5 6. h4 h6 7. 0-0-0 Nd7 8. f3 Bb7 9. g4 e6 10. Nh3 Ne7 11. Nf2 Qb8 12. Kb1 b4 13. Ne2 a5 14. c4 Ba6 15. Nc1 Nb6 16. b3 a4 17. c5 Nd7 18. Bxa6 Rxa6 19. Nfd3 Nc6 20. d5 Bc3 21. Qe2 Ne7 22. dxe6 fxe6 23. Nf4 Rc6 24. cxd6 cxd6 25. Nxe6 axb3 26. Nxb3 Ne5 27. Nbd4 Rc8 28. Qb5+ Kf7 29. Qxb8 Rxb8 30. Rhf1 Nc4 31. Bc1 Na3+ 32. Bxa3 bxa3+ 33. Kc2 Rhc8 34. Kd3 Rb2 35. Rc1 Rd2+ 36. Ke3 Rxa2 37. Rfd1 Rb2 38. Kd3 a2 0-1



Or Del Valle Corera–Kleiman

1 e4 g6 2 d4 Bg7 3 Nc3 d6 4 Be3 a6 5 Qd2 b5 6 h4 h6 7 0-0-0 Nd7 8 f3 Bb7 9 g4 c5 10 Nge2 Rc8 11 dc Nc5 12 Nf4 Qa5 13 Nfd5 b4 14 Nb1 Qa2 15 Qb4 Bd5 16 ed Nf6 17 Bc5 Rc5 18 Qb8 Kd7 19 Qb7 Rc7 20 Qa6 Ra8 21 Bb5 Kd8 22 Qa2 Ra2 23 Nc3 Ra5 24 Be2 Nd7 25 Kd2 Bc3 26 bc Rd5 27 Bd3 Ne5 28 Rhf1 Rdc5 29 Ra1 Kd7 30 h5 g5 31 Bf5 e6 32 Bd3 Rc3 33 f4 gf 34 Rf4 Ke7 35 Raf1 Ra3 36 Rb4 Ra8 37 Rbf4 Rg8 38 Be2 Rg5 39 c3 Ra7 40 Bd1 Ra2 41 Kc1 Rg2 42 c4 Nd3 43 Kb1 Rb2 44 Ka1 Ra5 0-1



Hoehne–Winbush

1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. Be3 a6 5. Qd2 b5 6. h4 h6 7. O-O-O Nd7 8. f3 Bb7 9. h5 g5 10. Nge2!? c5!? [Why not?] 11. dc Nc5? 12. Nd4 Qa5? 13. Nf5 Bc3 14. Qc3 Qc3 15. bc Nd7 16. c4 1-0



Ohlssen–Tiger

1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.Be3 a6 5.Qd2 b5 6.h4 h6 7 0-0-0 Nd7 8.f4 h5! 9.Nf3 c6! 10.Bd3 Nb6 11.Ne2 [11 f5(!) gf 12 ef Nc4 ∞] Nf6 12.Ng3 d5 13.e5 Ng4 14.Bg1 Nc4 15.Qe1 Nh6 16.b3 Nb6 17.Be3 Bg4 18.Bd2 e6 19.Ba5 Bf8 20.Qf2 Qc7 21.Nf1 Rb8 22.Ne3 c5 23.Nxg4 Nxg4 24.Qg1 c4 25.Be2 Qe7 26.Bc3 Qa3+ 27.Kb1 Na4 28.Ba1 Bb4 29.Nd2 Nc3+ 0-1



Hamdouchi–Bricard

1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. Be3 a6 5. Qd2 b5 6. h4 h6 7. O-O-O Nd7 8. f4 h5! 9. Bd3 Nh6! 10. Nf3 c6 11. f5 gxf5 12. exf5 Nf6 13. Bxh6 Bxh6 14. Ng5 Qb6 15. Qf4 Kf8 16. Qf3 Qxd4 17. Bxb5 Qb6 18. Bxc6 Rb8 19. b3 Bxf5 20. Qxf5 Qxc6 21. Nd5 Rb5 22. c4 Rxd5 23. Rxd5 Bxg5+ 24. hxg5 Nxd5 25. Rf1 f6 26. Qxd5 Qxd5 27. cxd5 Rg8 28. gxf6 Rxg2 29. a4 Rg5 30. fxe7+ Kxe7 31. Rd1 h4 32. Kc2 h3 33. Kc3 Rg4 34. b4 Rh4 35. a5 Kf6 36. b5 axb5 37. a6 Ke5 38. Ra1 Rh8 39. a7 h2 40. Kb4 Kxd5 41. Kxb5 Ke4 42. Rh1 Ra8 43. Kb6 d5 44. Rxh2 d4 45. Kb7 Rxa7+ 46. Kxa7 d3 47. Kb6 Ke3 48. Rh3+ Ke2 49. Kc5 d2 50. Rh2+ Kd3 51. Rxd2+ 1/2-1/2



Jacimovic–Sevo

1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. Be3 a6 5. Qd2 b5 6. h4 h6 7. h5 g5 8. f4 gxf4 9. Bxf4 Bb7 10. 0-0-0 Nd7 11. Nf3 c5 12. Nd5 Ngf6 1/2-1/2


« Last Edit: 06/29/17 at 01:37:11 by Michael Ayton »  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1768
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #22 - 06/27/17 at 14:42:49
Post Tools
Quote:
This little analysis mainly refers to Tigers book (p.151-201), which not only is a great theoretical work, but contains a huge collection of interesting lines and a bunch of inspiring ideas … by posting this analysis I still learned a lot about the move-order-trickeries …

The Modern Tiger is a fascinating work whether you play the Modern or not! – full of insights some of which have application to other openings as well (not least the Pirc, which of course is partly covered). I do wish though that openings books in general were more cogently organised! For example, in Chapter 3, Tiger comments rather differently on the same position in different places (4 Be3 a6 5 h4 Nf6 6 f3 b5 7 Qd2 h5 8 0-0-0 Bb7?! 9 Nh3 Nbd7 10 Ng5 e6: compare bottom right of p. 162 and bottom left of p. 176, where 11 Ne2 is called critical though the book’s first edition implies that 11 g3, which it seems has a big plus score, is actually best).

Also (and of greater interest to me), the move orders 5 Qd2 b5 6 f3 Nd7 7 h4 h5 8 Nh3 Bb7 9 a4 and 9 Ng5 (9 0-0-0 Rc8 10 Ng5 c5! is the variation you mention, of course) are missing.* After the former Black presumably should play 9 …c6 reaching page 158 after 10 Ng5 Ngf6 11 Be2 0-0, and after the latter perhaps 9 …c6 too, reaching page 156 after 10 0-0-0 Qc7! 11 Kb1 Ngf6. But here I notice that Nigel Short and others have played 9 …c5!? and so I wondered what happens after 10 a4 – is the idea the pawn sac 10 …Bd4 11 Bd4 cd 12 Qd4 Ngf6 13 ab ab? Anyway, I don’t understand why openings-book authors, before writing a specific chapter, don’t draw up (and print in the book) a simple flow-chart of all the pertinent move-transpositions, surely a simple enough matter when there’s software to assist. Apologies to all who know I’ve been banging on about this for years!


* In addition, in the ‘waiting game’ variation that you mention, given on p. 163 (6 h4 Nf6! 7 f3 h5 8 0-0-0 c6 9 Kb1! Qc7!), I think the sharp 10 Bf4!? should have been analysed, even if 10 …b4 is OK for Black.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
picasso911
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


Winning by pinning

Posts: 14
Joined: 06/19/17
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #21 - 06/26/17 at 19:10:03
Post Tools
fling wrote on 03/13/17 at 18:43:58:
RdC wrote on 03/11/17 at 23:01:13:
John Nunn, author of a book or two on the Modern is playing again in UK weekend tournaments. Here's how he met the Modern Tiger in this weekend's tournament in Exeter.

1. e4 d6 2.d4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Be3 a6 5. h4

This provoked the response 5. .. h5 whereupon Nh3 was played, followed up by Ng5, f3 and O-O-O. Later the regrouping Nc3-e2-f4 was played, putting a lot of pressure on e6 ( which was occupied by a pawn).


From what I have experienced and learned from similar positions (I don't play this set-up, but often ...g6 against the English), ...h5 is many times the least desired option for Black. I'd rather go ...h6, or something else, especially now when White has not played Qd2 (no Bh6 yet). If White has played Qd2, then ...h5 could be an option I guess. What does Tiger recommend?


The whole 4.Be3 business probably is - besides the infamous Austrian - the most dangerous and concurrently most interesting option for White against the Modern and the Pirc in particular.
Personally, 4.Be3 persuaded me to switch from the classical Pirc move-order to the more flexibel Modern move-order.

In the Modern Tiger, Persson adresses this setup on about 100 pages, mainly White playing the more dangerous f3 ("flexible dragon unleashed") and the more solid Nf3 ("flexible dragon restrained").

Before taking 5.h4 into account, it seems sensible to analyse the really popular "starting position" of this system after the following moves:

1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.Be3 a6 5.Qd2 b5

White's typicalplan generally include f3, 0-0-0, h4, Nh3-g5 and crushing Black on the Kingside or in the center with a timely e5-Break.
Black's typical ideas are Bb7, Nd7, c(6-)5, Qc7, sometimes Rc8 and Ngf6 as well and crushing White on the Queenside without allowing too much Counterplay on his own king.
Because of his limited influence in the center it seems that Black has to react more carefully to White's play than the other way around.

Having said this, a very important idea against White's h4 followed by the annoying Nh3-g5 (if Black plays ...h5) is simply to knock out the Knight with ...Bxh3 as soon as possible.
So, after 6.h4 Black shouldn't play the automatic 6...h5?! as 7.Nf3! secures White the possibiliy of playing Ng5 and putting pressure on Blacks kingside.
Instead, Black should react 6...Ngf6, attacking e4 and more or less forcing 7.f3 as White wants to play this move anyway. Only now Black plays 7...h5! since Nf3 is no longer an option.
After 8.0-0-0 (part of White's plan) Black has to adjust his play a little bit, since his normal moves 8...Bb7 as well as 8...Nd7 allow the critical 9.Nh3 in turn. So Tiger recommends 8...c6! as half a waiting move preparing ...Qc7, after which play may continue 9.Kb1 (9.Nh3 Bxh3 10.Rxh3 Nbd7 and Black could execute his idea) 9...Qc7 10.e5 Nd5 11.f4 Nxc3+ 12.Qxc3 0-0 with roughly equal play.

In view of this, White may play 6.0-0-0 first, since Black's normal moves 6...Nd7 and 6...Bb7 both allow 7.Nh3. Although the sophisticated 6...c6!? is playable, Tiger recommends the much more natural sequence:

6.0-0-0 Bb7 7.f3 Nd7 8.h4 h5 9.Nh3 Rc8!?

In this move-order Black cannot really avoid facing a white Knight on g5, but in particular for the Ne2-f4-maneuver he seems to be better prepared as the following line shows:

10.Ng5 c5 11.Ne2 Qc7 12.Kb1 Ngf6 13.d5
(13.g3 with the idea Bh3 is met by 13...cxd4 14.Nxd4 Ne5 as well as 13.Nf4? runs into the typical tactic 13...cxd4 14.Bxd4 e5!)
13...Ne5 14.Nf4 Qb6 (avoiding any fork on e6) and White's play seems a little bit stuck at the moment when Black may rush is queenside pawns.

Having said all this, after the immediate 5.h4 Black should play 5...Nf6! similar to the variations above since 6.Qd2 b5 transposes.

The alternative (and maybe more risky) setup against White's h4 is ...h6, intending to meet h4-h5 with ...g5, however creating a hole on f5 (as ...e6 usually weakens d6 a bit too much) and a potential pawn-break in f4.
Nevertheless, if White postpones long castling and plays with a quick g4, Black sometimes should employ the ..h6 plan as a sample line may show:

1.e4 g6 2.d4 Bg7 3.Nc3 d6 4.Be3 a6 5.Qd2 b5 6.f3 Nd7 7.g4!? Bb7 8.Nge2
(Noteworthy the clumsy 8.h4?! is strongly met by 8...h5! [here it works!] 9.gxh5 Rxh5 10.Nge2 Bf6 11.Bf2 e5 and Black is fine.)
8...c5 9.h4
(9.dxc5 Ne5! eyeballing f3 as well as c4 is level.)
9...h6
(Now 9...h5 dosn't work as well as previously since 10.gxh5 Rxh5 11.Ng3 Rh7 12.h5 is good for White.)
10.Ng3 Qc7
(10...e6 is a safer option but not everybody's taste.)
11.h5 d5! 12.Bf4 e5! and Black unleashes his forces.

Summed up, Black shouldn't play ...h5 light-hearted, but sometimes it's a necessity to stop White's immediate kingside-play. Moreover, Black always should keep his ...Bxh3-idea in mind, sometimes even by delaying ...Bb7 or ...Nd7 with ...c6.
If White plays g4 in preperation for h4, Black can employ his second weapon with ...h6 followed by ...g5, but since this creates static weaknesses, Black should play energetically.

This little analysis mainly refers to Tigers book (p.151-201), which not only is a great theoretical work, but contains a huge collection of interesting lines and a bunch of inspiring ideas.

Hopefully that helped (as it helped myself - by posting this analysis I still learned a lot about the move-order-trickeries)!  Grin
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
fling
God Member
*****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 1494
Joined: 01/21/11
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #20 - 03/13/17 at 18:43:58
Post Tools
RdC wrote on 03/11/17 at 23:01:13:
John Nunn, author of a book or two on the Modern is playing again in UK weekend tournaments. Here's how he met the Modern Tiger in this weekend's tournament in Exeter.

1. e4 d6 2.d4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Be3 a6 5. h4

This provoked the response 5. .. h5 whereupon Nh3 was played, followed up by Ng5, f3 and O-O-O. Later the regrouping Nc3-e2-f4 was played, putting a lot of pressure on e6 ( which was occupied by a pawn).


From what I have experienced and learned from similar positions (I don't play this set-up, but often ...g6 against the English), ...h5 is many times the least desired option for Black. I'd rather go ...h6, or something else, especially now when White has not played Qd2 (no Bh6 yet). If White has played Qd2, then ...h5 could be an option I guess. What does Tiger recommend?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
mn
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 259
Location: Ottawa
Joined: 09/22/16
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #19 - 03/13/17 at 17:15:39
Post Tools
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
kylemeister
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 4284
Location: USA
Joined: 10/24/05
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #18 - 03/12/17 at 23:57:16
Post Tools
RdC wrote on 03/11/17 at 23:01:13:
John Nunn, author of a book or two on the Modern is playing again in UK weekend tournaments. Here's how he met the Modern Tiger in this weekend's tournament in Exeter.

1. e4 d6 2.d4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Be3 a6 5. h4

This provoked the response 5. .. h5 whereupon Nh3 was played, followed up by Ng5, f3 and O-O-O. Later the regrouping Nc3-e2-f4 was played, putting a lot of pressure on e6 ( which was occupied by a pawn).


Irrelevant observation:  Dr. N keeps a neat scoresheet.  (From looking at other rounds, it is evident that the second one for that game [sixth one in the file] is his.)
https://eastdevonchesscongress.files.wordpress.com/2017/03/r2-open.pdf
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
RdC
God Member
*****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 723
Joined: 05/17/08
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #17 - 03/11/17 at 23:01:13
Post Tools
John Nunn, author of a book or two on the Modern is playing again in UK weekend tournaments. Here's how he met the Modern Tiger in this weekend's tournament in Exeter.

1. e4 d6 2.d4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Be3 a6 5. h4

This provoked the response 5. .. h5 whereupon Nh3 was played, followed up by Ng5, f3 and O-O-O. Later the regrouping Nc3-e2-f4 was played, putting a lot of pressure on e6 ( which was occupied by a pawn).
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Confused_by_Theory
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 308
Location: Europe
Joined: 05/13/15
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #16 - 01/24/17 at 10:59:35
Post Tools
Hi.

Fighting games. Was very enjoyable to go through both Smiley.

Have a nice day.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Paul Brondal
Junior Member
**
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 79
Location: Denmark
Joined: 05/20/14
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #15 - 01/23/17 at 11:45:40
Post Tools
Ooops, sorry. The first game is the following: http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=109270 where I played black against FM Strange. The second game is the same: http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=109327
  
Back to top
IP Logged
 
Paul Brondal
Junior Member
**
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 79
Location: Denmark
Joined: 05/20/14
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #14 - 01/18/17 at 12:19:13
Post Tools
I really love his book. My last 2 games with the black pieces have been the Hippo. I hope that it is OK including them here.

In the first game, the white player has an ELO just above 2400: http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=109271

In the above game, white has a won position around move 45 and black has a won position around move 60. It was really a tough game because we had 90 minutes + 30s per move for the entire game and the last 50 moves were played with very little time left.

In the second game, the white player had 2250:

http://www.chessvideos.tv/chess-game-replayer.php?id=109327

The place where white blunders the exchange he is virtually down to 30 s per move. This was played in the Danish division league.

I will definitely continue to have the Modern as a surprise weapon. Tiger's book is truly inspiring I find.
  
Back to top
IP Logged
 
Paddy
God Member
*****
Offline


The truth will out!

Posts: 888
Location: Manchester
Joined: 01/10/03
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #13 - 08/13/16 at 21:31:59
Post Tools
Tiger Hillarp has added some more Modern Defence annotations at his blog
http://tiger.bagofcats.net/
following his recent exhibition match at 15 minutes +5 seconds vs. Morozevich.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1768
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #12 - 07/22/16 at 00:10:22
Post Tools
Many thanks for this! I should have known to look there. Love the annotation to Black's seventh!
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Paddy
God Member
*****
Offline


The truth will out!

Posts: 888
Location: Manchester
Joined: 01/10/03
Gender: Male
Re: The Modern Tiger (Tiger's Modern 2 ed)
Reply #11 - 07/21/16 at 23:49:47
Post Tools

Tiger has commented on the recent Wei Yi-Carlsen game (Bilbao) at
http://tiger.bagofcats.net/


  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 [2] 3 
Topic Tools
Bookmarks: del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Google+ Linked in reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Yahoo