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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move (Read 25741 times)
dimis
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #51 - 10/01/14 at 12:39:47
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This book made me to play again Alekhine against a NM.
Also do you thing the lines at some variations fit the will to play for a win?
I played Alekhine with Taylor recommendation and I stop played it for that reason.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #50 - 09/25/14 at 22:00:06
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Quote:
I take a quick look today at this book and I saw that he proposed 5...g6 at the 4 pawn attack.My question is what is the opinion for this variation,Someone who played the Alekhine defence told me that is rather passive even as I saw that black with accurate play must be ok.


I rather like it. I first saw the line in Taylor's book, Alekhine Alert, but Cox i think also mentioned it briefly as being worth further investigation.

It doesnt have the depth of theory to learn as the more traditional main lines of the four pawn and i feel it is more reliable than some of the riskier lines and fairly thematic. 

My only concern is that the player who Taylor named the variation after only played the variation a handful of times on my database (which admittedly isnt upto date) so i dont know if there is a significant flaw, or whether that player just gave up competitive chess, the variation or the opening...

The key to the line for the black player is that it doesnt require too much memorisation and if you arent playing a booked up player with the white pieces who knows the exact move order, you have a very good chance of getting a good position.
  

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dimis
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #49 - 09/25/14 at 16:01:02
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I take a quick look today at this book and I saw that he proposed 5...g6 at the 4 pawn attack.My question is what is the opinion for this variation,Someone who played the Alekhine defence told me that is rather passive even as I saw that black with accurate play must be ok.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #48 - 04/13/14 at 19:32:28
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In a previous post I said I like several things in this book. However, the more I read it, the more agree with MarkG’s evaluation, and which by the way quite well sums it up.

My approach to the book, is more, not to follow it as repertoire openingbook, but more as a book which has collection of several (very nice) commented games on the Alekhine defence. Some of them are very interesting.

As a repertoire book, however, it is difficult to follow. In some chapters it is difficult to understand what the author recommends.  I liked his book on the Slav where the games in each chapter where strongly related and one could understand the different ideas and advantages of playing each move, or each relevant move for the variation.
Here, I think this is reasonably well done in some chapters (e.g., the 4PA, the Voroznev part in the cxd6 exchange and perhaps the Chase which I have not yet examined in detail).
However, the layout of the other chapters is confusing to me.  In the anti-main line chapter, it appears that the suggestion ends with 3…Nb6. Then on the 4th move what should Black do? Play 4…d5 (which is the Westerinen line) or 4…d6 which appears in most of the games shown here and transposes to the main line with 4.Nf3 Nb6. My main point is that the author recommends 4…d5 at the beginning of the chapter but then shows more games with  4…d6 and in two cases we have exactly the same position, one with d5 the other with d6.
Also, the main motivation for this chapter appears to be: “bored with the Miles ?” then why not surprise your opponent with 3…Nb6? Ok, but then the author is suggesting to exchange a line that gives equality (the Miles) with best play by one that does not well from a statistical point of view, and also needs “good insights” to play it well (is this the book that gives such insights?). Also, why not look at the games of  the players that have been playing consistently this line, e.g, Konopka?
The Miles chapter also was a disappointment to me, mostly for a lack of “focus and relation” on the games in the chapter. Perhaps the reason was that the author did not want to lose much time with this line since it is boring, and only wanted to give an overview. The author gives the main line for Black after White’s 6.Be2 in the Sutovski-Miroschnichenko game (which by the way is a very nice game from Black’s point of view but I guess Sutovski’s 12.f4 did not catch on). Inside he makes a brief reference to a variant appearing in the game Karyakin-Kamsky (see also  A. Greet’s main variation in his e4 book) which appears to be the critical line to evaluate the reliability of this line. But then, why only a brief reference to it? This appears to be the line that would need a book analysis, no? Was it because in Karyakin-Kamsky, Black lost?

Of course there are those games that must appear in every repertoire book. But does the Topalov-Carlsen game illustrates how Black should play against 6.Bd3 in the Miles (or the sidelines given here) ?

In the exd6 exchange, not clear what should be the “receipt” against White’s Bd3 and Nge2 plan. Not clear to me after examining the first two games in the chapter.  Something interesting here, the rapid game Ivanchuk-Carlsen is used by Taylor to show that Black should not allow Bd3 and Nge2. Here Lakdawala, uses this game to show how Black should play (or should have played) to make this line viable for Black. Apparently Houdini agrees with Lakdawala.

I was also expecting a better explanation of why 6…Be7 is better than 6…Nc6 is the exd6 exchange (is it?).

I feel that many games here are quite long, and space could have been used to provide more opening explanations. Also, there are those games that are neatly played from Black’s point of view, should even be considered as model games for Black but are simply ignored because they quickly fade to a draw. I am remembering two Short games, one against Hou Hifan where he plays 5…exd6 and then 6… Nc6 which well illustrates the advantages of 6…Nc6. White had simply nothing.
As I said before I liked the Voroznev part in the cxd6 chapter. The last game is interesting and the evaluation and the author’s comments appear to be against “folklore” but his evaluation is worth a look (well, as I said there are parts in the book that appeal to me). What bothers me in this chapter are the rapid games in the other lines which gave a very bad idea of White can do in the exchange.

Well, to summarize, I am with MarkG.
Mr. Cox, 2nd edition, please.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #47 - 04/12/14 at 19:38:33
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I have had the book for a couple of weeks now but have found it tough going to get into it. This is my first Lakdawala book and the prose has been a surprise. Here is someone who makes Tim Taylor seem clear and concise.

Initial impressions are that there are lots of omissions especially of minor lines - which are precisely the kind of thing that crop up in lower level games. So it is hard to see who the book is aimed at. Taylor does a much better job of acknowledging the practical importance of these lines and dealing with them, even if I don't agree with many of his actual recommendations.

In my view, Cox still provides the best introduction to the Alekhine. How about a second edition John? Smiley

  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #46 - 04/11/14 at 17:57:53
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Nice game today with the Alekhine.
The Exchange with 5...exd6 may be known as leading to boring games.
However today, Black won with two Exchange sacrífices, the first one the thematic Exchange of the rook in e8 for the bishop in e3 (this has been played before in similar positions).

White did not play the recommended White variation.
However he is 150 Elo stronger than Black. Game below


Volokitin,Andrei (2647) - Bortnyk,Olexandr (2495) [B03]
XXI Russian Team-ch 2014 Men Loo (5), 11.04.2014
[Robot 9]

1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.d4 d6 4.c4 Nb6 5.exd6 exd6 6.Nc3 Be7 7.h3 0-0 8.Bd3 Re8 9.Nge2 Bf6 10.0-0 Nc6 11.b3 d5 12.c5 Nd7 13.Bc2 Nf8 14.Be3 b6 15.cxb6 axb6 16.a3 Na5 17.Bd3 Bb7 18.Qc2 c5 19.Rfd1 Rxe3 (first exchange sacrífice) 20.fxe3 Qe8 21.b4 Qxe3+ 22.Kh1 cxd4 23.bxa5 dxc3 24.a6 Rxa6 second exchange sacrífice) 25.Bxa6 Bxa6 26.Nc1 d4 27.Nd3 Bb7 28.Nf2 Bh4 29.Rf1 Ne6 30.Nd1 Qxh3+ 31.Kg1 Qg4 32.Ra2 Bd5 33.Qa4 Bxa2 34.Nxc3 Bb3 35.Qxb3 dxc3 36.Qxc3 Qd4+ 37.Qxd4 Nxd4 38.Rb1 Bd8 39.Kf2 Ne6 40.Ke3 Be7 41.a4 h5 42.Kd2 Bc5 43.Kc3 h4 44.Kc4 g5 Kd4 0-1

  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #45 - 03/18/14 at 20:56:32
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I must confess that I am atracted to this book.
It doe snot contain the rather assertive comments that appears in taylor's book
I could say several things, and point out several parts in the book that are really nice.

However, I also have noticed a few "weak" points.
I would have preferred more topical games in the Miles main line, after all CL states that the line is at best +/= for White and that good players can draw.
Thus more material would have more nice.

He also points out that after 4.Nf3 he only looks at 4...dxe5. WRONG!!

In the Westerinen anti main-line, he also discusses through a diferent mover order the variation with 4...Nb6.
For instance,
1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3.d4 Nb6 4. Nc3 d6
in the Westerinen line, Black always plays d5, he claims that 4.Nc3 is not a good move and thus Black can play 4...d6.
("the pawn should be on c4" - however, in other books where the move Nb6 is used, the authors claim that the development move Nc3 is better since White does not need to waste time with c4)
After 5. Nf3 as in CL's book we have a reasonable (topical variation) of the main line with 4...Nb6.
He discusses this very briefly, in several parts, under several move orders. In fact, I think that in more than half of the games in this chapter Black plays d6 instead of d5 (which is the Westerinen line where Black looks for a french type approach).
Thus, a connection to the main line with 4...Nb6 could be interesting and enlightening.
Also, this variation, with d6, is a land mine (although i think it can be played) and more topical games would have been welcome in a move by move book.
In fact "caveman" approaches based on a quick h4-h5 are also interesting and Black needs to know what to do otherwise it gets slaughtered (see two articles in NYC)

Thus, this was a disapointment to me more based on "an opportunity missed".

Anyway, this was a side comment on an otherwise nice "tour de force" book.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #44 - 03/15/14 at 22:46:43
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That makes sense. And against 10...Bg4 11.Be2 d5!? (given as note in my previous post), instead of the "automatic" 12.c5 (when something like 12...Nc8 13.b4 a6 14.a4 Nc6 15.b5 axb5 16.axb5 Na5 17.Bg5 doesn't look unplayable for Black) White can again play 12.h3 and grab the bishop pair for apparently not a lot.
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #43 - 03/15/14 at 13:34:24
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@Stigma, I did conclude that I did not want to play Bg4 until the central structure after d6-d5 and c4-c5 had been established. This is because if white does not play c4-c5 Rc1 is actually a useful move, but if white locks with c4-c5 the rook belongs on b1. After 10..Bg4 11.Be2 e6 13.h3 I don't particularly like blacks position.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #42 - 03/14/14 at 01:35:05
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@Ludde: I suppose you've already concluded that taking the tempo loss with ...Bg4 somewhere after 10.Nf3 is too slow? This has been played both by and against Nakamura, and I half-intended to play it in a club game recently (in the end I got worried about White's alternatives to the Voronezh with Bd3/Nge2 or h3/Nf3/Be2 and decided on ...exd6 instead). Maybe the way Nakamura played as White against Zinchenko, delaying castling to get on with b4-b5, is problematic? Black can avoid that with 11...e6, but it doesn't look like he had quite enough for the bishop pair against Baklan.



Edit: Actually, Nakamura-Zonchenko (which was merely a blitz game) did end up with the standard structure for this line after 19...a6 and 20...axb5, and probably something like 21...Nxe3 22.fxe3 e5 would have been perfectly OK for Black. But White could play 20.bxa6 instead and already have a protected passed pawn!

13...a6 was perhaps the solution for Black, though 14.b4 Nc6 15.b5 axb5 16.axb5 Na5 17.Bg5!? is a bit annoying - exploiting the tempo "saved" by delaying castling to make the necessary ...e6 harder to get in.
« Last Edit: 03/14/14 at 04:29:27 by Stigma »  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #41 - 03/13/14 at 23:10:52
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Paddy wrote on 03/13/14 at 13:04:57:
Although I only use the Alekhine as an occasional weapon these days, I retain an interest in the theory and decided I should buy the Lakdawala book, despite worries that he has been so productive recently that quality control might be suffering. I'm also not a great fan of his over-the-top style of writing, but O.K., there's usually some good chess sense hidden beneath the verbiage.

I've not read the book in detail yet, but I immediately turned to the chapter on the critical Voronezh line in the ...cxd6 exchange. I think the author makes a good case that 9...e5 is adequate (but Black needs to have done his homework) as has long been argued by Markovich here on the forum,  by Watson on Chess Publishing and by Cox in his (still) excellent book.

However, I was disappointed with Lakdawala's brief dismissal of 9...Bf5, which has been played by some strong players and has been discussed at some length here on the forum (but ignored on Chess Publishing). Lakdawala merely gives 10 d5, on the basis of 10...e5 11 g4 (Dvoiris-Steffens, Oberwart 2004) whereas in my opinion 10...e6!?is critical,  provoking 11 g4, which leads to a fascinatingly unbalanced game. See for instance

[Event "GBR-ch 97th"]
[Site "Canterbury"]
[Date "2010.07.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Adair, James"]
[Black "Tymrakiewicz, Rafal"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B03"]
[WhiteElo "2205"]
[BlackElo "2301"]
[PlyCount "136"]
[EventDate "2010.07.26"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "ENG"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2010.09.01"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. exd6 cxd6 6. Nc3 g6 7. Be3 Bg7 8. Rc1 O-O 9. b3 Bf5 10. d5 e6 11. g4 Bxc3+ 12. Rxc3 Be4 13. f3 Bxd5 14. cxd5 Nxd5 15. Rd3 Nc6 16. Rxd5 exd5 17. Ne2 Re8 18. Kf2 Rxe3 19. Kxe3 Qb6+ 20. Kf4 Qf2 21. Nc3 Re8 22. Nxd5 Re5 23. h4 Nd4 24. Nf6+ Kg7 25. g5 Ne6+ 26. Kg4 h5+ 27. gxh6+ Kxf6 28. Qxd6 Rf5 29. Qg3 Rf4+ 30. Qxf4+ Nxf4 31. Kxf4 Qxa2 32. Bc4 Qd2+ 33. Kg3 Qxh6 34. Rd1 Ke7 35. Re1+ Kf8 36. f4 Qg7 37. Re5 a6 38. Bd5 b5 39. Bc6 Qf6 40. Bf3 Qd6 41. h5 gxh5 42. Rxh5 Qg6+ 43. Kh4 Qd3 44. Bd5 Kg7 45. Rg5+ Kf6 46. Re5 Qc2 47. Kg4 a5 48. Kf3 Qd3+ 49. Kg4 a4 50. bxa4 bxa4 51. Bf3 a3 52. Ra5
Qg6+ 53. Kh3 Qd3 54. Kg4 Ke7 55. Bd5 f6 56. Ra7+ Kd6 57. Bf7 Kc5 58. Be6 Qg6+ 59. Kf3 Qd3+ 60. Kg4 Kb6 61. Rf7 Qg6+ 62. Kf3 f5 63. Bd5 Qg4+ 64. Ke3 Qg3+ 65. Bf3 a2 66. Rf6+ Ka7 67. Rf7+ Kb8 68. Rb7+ Kc8 0-1


I have played 9..Bf5 in a couple of correspondence games and thought I had found the "solution" to the Voronezh until I recently ran into 10.Nf3 d5 11.c5 Nc8 12.h3 Nc6 13.Be2 e6 14.O-O N8e7 15.g4 Be4 16.Ng5 Rb8 17.Qd2 h6 18.Ngxe4 dxe4 19.Rcd1. I will finally hold this game (actually we have reached a rook ending covered by tablebases, so I have no concerns any more - not about discussing the game either) but only after severe agony. The position here is not nice to play at all for black, and requires several "only moves". I seriously doubt it could be held between equals in an OTB game. So at the moment I think it is back to the old 9..e5 which is the only way to go. It is a shame really - in the other games I got nice play with this line, but the continuation above has closed the chapter on 9..Bf5 for me.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #40 - 03/13/14 at 13:53:37
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Hi, Paddy!
You are right - 9...Bf5 and 10...e6 is the path for black, imho.
I always thought of this move 7.Be3 as premature in this exact move order.
The white d4-pawn is not under attack after all. At least, for now.. So why this hurry with 7.Be3 - I don't know.  Roll Eyes
That's why 7.h3!? Bg7 8.Nf3 0-0 9.Be2 Nc6 10.0-0 Bf5 11.Re1 was always my choice for white.  Wink
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #39 - 03/13/14 at 13:31:59
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That looks fun Smiley

Not some random 2200 losing either of course. Adair is over 2400 now and is a rather skilled chaos merchant with it.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #38 - 03/13/14 at 13:04:57
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Although I only use the Alekhine as an occasional weapon these days, I retain an interest in the theory and decided I should buy the Lakdawala book, despite worries that he has been so productive recently that quality control might be suffering. I'm also not a great fan of his over-the-top style of writing, but O.K., there's usually some good chess sense hidden beneath the verbiage.

I've not read the book in detail yet, but I immediately turned to the chapter on the critical Voronezh line in the ...cxd6 exchange. I think the author makes a good case that 9...e5 is adequate (but Black needs to have done his homework) as has long been argued by Markovich here on the forum,  by Watson on Chess Publishing and by Cox in his (still) excellent book.

However, I was disappointed with Lakdawala's brief dismissal of 9...Bf5, which has been played by some strong players and has been discussed at some length here on the forum (but ignored on Chess Publishing). Lakdawala merely gives 10 d5, on the basis of 10...e5 11 g4 (Dvoiris-Steffens, Oberwart 2004) whereas in my opinion 10...e6!?is critical,  provoking 11 g4, which leads to a fascinatingly unbalanced game. See for instance

[Event "GBR-ch 97th"]
[Site "Canterbury"]
[Date "2010.07.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Adair, James"]
[Black "Tymrakiewicz, Rafal"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B03"]
[WhiteElo "2205"]
[BlackElo "2301"]
[PlyCount "136"]
[EventDate "2010.07.26"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "ENG"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2010.09.01"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. exd6 cxd6 6. Nc3 g6 7. Be3 Bg7 8. Rc1 O-O 9. b3 Bf5 10. d5 e6 11. g4 Bxc3+ 12. Rxc3 Be4 13. f3 Bxd5 14. cxd5 Nxd5 15. Rd3 Nc6 16. Rxd5 exd5 17. Ne2 Re8 18. Kf2 Rxe3 19. Kxe3 Qb6+ 20. Kf4 Qf2 21. Nc3 Re8 22. Nxd5 Re5 23. h4 Nd4 24. Nf6+ Kg7 25. g5 Ne6+ 26. Kg4 h5+ 27. gxh6+ Kxf6 28. Qxd6 Rf5 29. Qg3 Rf4+ 30. Qxf4+ Nxf4 31. Kxf4 Qxa2 32. Bc4 Qd2+ 33. Kg3 Qxh6 34. Rd1 Ke7 35. Re1+ Kf8 36. f4 Qg7 37. Re5 a6 38. Bd5 b5 39. Bc6 Qf6 40. Bf3 Qd6 41. h5 gxh5 42. Rxh5 Qg6+ 43. Kh4 Qd3 44. Bd5 Kg7 45. Rg5+ Kf6 46. Re5 Qc2 47. Kg4 a5 48. Kf3 Qd3+ 49. Kg4 a4 50. bxa4 bxa4 51. Bf3 a3 52. Ra5
Qg6+ 53. Kh3 Qd3 54. Kg4 Ke7 55. Bd5 f6 56. Ra7+ Kd6 57. Bf7 Kc5 58. Be6 Qg6+ 59. Kf3 Qd3+ 60. Kg4 Kb6 61. Rf7 Qg6+ 62. Kf3 f5 63. Bd5 Qg4+ 64. Ke3 Qg3+ 65. Bf3 a2 66. Rf6+ Ka7 67. Rf7+ Kb8 68. Rb7+ Kc8 0-1
  

Bf5_01.pgn ( 1 KB | Downloads )
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #37 - 03/08/14 at 22:56:56
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I think he suggests

4...dxe5 5. Nxe5 c6 and after
i) 6.Be2 Bf5 7.OO Nd7 8. Nf3 e6 9.c4 N5f6 10. Nc3 Bd6, at least this is what has been played by Miroschnichenko
also he analyses 7. g4 and 8.Bg4 (based on the games) but not sure what are the main suggestions

ii) after Bc4 it appears he recommends a transposition to the Kengis (again based on games)

iii) Bd3, not sure what line he suggests since he gives the Topalov-Carlsen game and Topalov played not the best move after 6...Nd7 7.NxN?!
  
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