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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move (Read 29703 times)
dimis
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #51 - 10/01/14 at 12:39:47
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This book made me to play again Alekhine against a NM.
Also do you thing the lines at some variations fit the will to play for a win?
I played Alekhine with Taylor recommendation and I stop played it for that reason.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #50 - 09/25/14 at 22:00:06
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Quote:
I take a quick look today at this book and I saw that he proposed 5...g6 at the 4 pawn attack.My question is what is the opinion for this variation,Someone who played the Alekhine defence told me that is rather passive even as I saw that black with accurate play must be ok.


I rather like it. I first saw the line in Taylor's book, Alekhine Alert, but Cox i think also mentioned it briefly as being worth further investigation.

It doesnt have the depth of theory to learn as the more traditional main lines of the four pawn and i feel it is more reliable than some of the riskier lines and fairly thematic. 

My only concern is that the player who Taylor named the variation after only played the variation a handful of times on my database (which admittedly isnt upto date) so i dont know if there is a significant flaw, or whether that player just gave up competitive chess, the variation or the opening...

The key to the line for the black player is that it doesnt require too much memorisation and if you arent playing a booked up player with the white pieces who knows the exact move order, you have a very good chance of getting a good position.
  

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dimis
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #49 - 09/25/14 at 16:01:02
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I take a quick look today at this book and I saw that he proposed 5...g6 at the 4 pawn attack.My question is what is the opinion for this variation,Someone who played the Alekhine defence told me that is rather passive even as I saw that black with accurate play must be ok.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #48 - 04/13/14 at 19:32:28
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In a previous post I said I like several things in this book. However, the more I read it, the more agree with MarkG’s evaluation, and which by the way quite well sums it up.

My approach to the book, is more, not to follow it as repertoire openingbook, but more as a book which has collection of several (very nice) commented games on the Alekhine defence. Some of them are very interesting.

As a repertoire book, however, it is difficult to follow. In some chapters it is difficult to understand what the author recommends.  I liked his book on the Slav where the games in each chapter where strongly related and one could understand the different ideas and advantages of playing each move, or each relevant move for the variation.
Here, I think this is reasonably well done in some chapters (e.g., the 4PA, the Voroznev part in the cxd6 exchange and perhaps the Chase which I have not yet examined in detail).
However, the layout of the other chapters is confusing to me.  In the anti-main line chapter, it appears that the suggestion ends with 3…Nb6. Then on the 4th move what should Black do? Play 4…d5 (which is the Westerinen line) or 4…d6 which appears in most of the games shown here and transposes to the main line with 4.Nf3 Nb6. My main point is that the author recommends 4…d5 at the beginning of the chapter but then shows more games with  4…d6 and in two cases we have exactly the same position, one with d5 the other with d6.
Also, the main motivation for this chapter appears to be: “bored with the Miles ?” then why not surprise your opponent with 3…Nb6? Ok, but then the author is suggesting to exchange a line that gives equality (the Miles) with best play by one that does not well from a statistical point of view, and also needs “good insights” to play it well (is this the book that gives such insights?). Also, why not look at the games of  the players that have been playing consistently this line, e.g, Konopka?
The Miles chapter also was a disappointment to me, mostly for a lack of “focus and relation” on the games in the chapter. Perhaps the reason was that the author did not want to lose much time with this line since it is boring, and only wanted to give an overview. The author gives the main line for Black after White’s 6.Be2 in the Sutovski-Miroschnichenko game (which by the way is a very nice game from Black’s point of view but I guess Sutovski’s 12.f4 did not catch on). Inside he makes a brief reference to a variant appearing in the game Karyakin-Kamsky (see also  A. Greet’s main variation in his e4 book) which appears to be the critical line to evaluate the reliability of this line. But then, why only a brief reference to it? This appears to be the line that would need a book analysis, no? Was it because in Karyakin-Kamsky, Black lost?

Of course there are those games that must appear in every repertoire book. But does the Topalov-Carlsen game illustrates how Black should play against 6.Bd3 in the Miles (or the sidelines given here) ?

In the exd6 exchange, not clear what should be the “receipt” against White’s Bd3 and Nge2 plan. Not clear to me after examining the first two games in the chapter.  Something interesting here, the rapid game Ivanchuk-Carlsen is used by Taylor to show that Black should not allow Bd3 and Nge2. Here Lakdawala, uses this game to show how Black should play (or should have played) to make this line viable for Black. Apparently Houdini agrees with Lakdawala.

I was also expecting a better explanation of why 6…Be7 is better than 6…Nc6 is the exd6 exchange (is it?).

I feel that many games here are quite long, and space could have been used to provide more opening explanations. Also, there are those games that are neatly played from Black’s point of view, should even be considered as model games for Black but are simply ignored because they quickly fade to a draw. I am remembering two Short games, one against Hou Hifan where he plays 5…exd6 and then 6… Nc6 which well illustrates the advantages of 6…Nc6. White had simply nothing.
As I said before I liked the Voroznev part in the cxd6 chapter. The last game is interesting and the evaluation and the author’s comments appear to be against “folklore” but his evaluation is worth a look (well, as I said there are parts in the book that appeal to me). What bothers me in this chapter are the rapid games in the other lines which gave a very bad idea of White can do in the exchange.

Well, to summarize, I am with MarkG.
Mr. Cox, 2nd edition, please.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #47 - 04/12/14 at 19:38:33
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I have had the book for a couple of weeks now but have found it tough going to get into it. This is my first Lakdawala book and the prose has been a surprise. Here is someone who makes Tim Taylor seem clear and concise.

Initial impressions are that there are lots of omissions especially of minor lines - which are precisely the kind of thing that crop up in lower level games. So it is hard to see who the book is aimed at. Taylor does a much better job of acknowledging the practical importance of these lines and dealing with them, even if I don't agree with many of his actual recommendations.

In my view, Cox still provides the best introduction to the Alekhine. How about a second edition John? Smiley

  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #46 - 04/11/14 at 17:57:53
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Nice game today with the Alekhine.
The Exchange with 5...exd6 may be known as leading to boring games.
However today, Black won with two Exchange sacrífices, the first one the thematic Exchange of the rook in e8 for the bishop in e3 (this has been played before in similar positions).

White did not play the recommended White variation.
However he is 150 Elo stronger than Black. Game below


Volokitin,Andrei (2647) - Bortnyk,Olexandr (2495) [B03]
XXI Russian Team-ch 2014 Men Loo (5), 11.04.2014
[Robot 9]

1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.d4 d6 4.c4 Nb6 5.exd6 exd6 6.Nc3 Be7 7.h3 0-0 8.Bd3 Re8 9.Nge2 Bf6 10.0-0 Nc6 11.b3 d5 12.c5 Nd7 13.Bc2 Nf8 14.Be3 b6 15.cxb6 axb6 16.a3 Na5 17.Bd3 Bb7 18.Qc2 c5 19.Rfd1 Rxe3 (first exchange sacrífice) 20.fxe3 Qe8 21.b4 Qxe3+ 22.Kh1 cxd4 23.bxa5 dxc3 24.a6 Rxa6 second exchange sacrífice) 25.Bxa6 Bxa6 26.Nc1 d4 27.Nd3 Bb7 28.Nf2 Bh4 29.Rf1 Ne6 30.Nd1 Qxh3+ 31.Kg1 Qg4 32.Ra2 Bd5 33.Qa4 Bxa2 34.Nxc3 Bb3 35.Qxb3 dxc3 36.Qxc3 Qd4+ 37.Qxd4 Nxd4 38.Rb1 Bd8 39.Kf2 Ne6 40.Ke3 Be7 41.a4 h5 42.Kd2 Bc5 43.Kc3 h4 44.Kc4 g5 Kd4 0-1

  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #45 - 03/18/14 at 20:56:32
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I must confess that I am atracted to this book.
It doe snot contain the rather assertive comments that appears in taylor's book
I could say several things, and point out several parts in the book that are really nice.

However, I also have noticed a few "weak" points.
I would have preferred more topical games in the Miles main line, after all CL states that the line is at best +/= for White and that good players can draw.
Thus more material would have more nice.

He also points out that after 4.Nf3 he only looks at 4...dxe5. WRONG!!

In the Westerinen anti main-line, he also discusses through a diferent mover order the variation with 4...Nb6.
For instance,
1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3.d4 Nb6 4. Nc3 d6
in the Westerinen line, Black always plays d5, he claims that 4.Nc3 is not a good move and thus Black can play 4...d6.
("the pawn should be on c4" - however, in other books where the move Nb6 is used, the authors claim that the development move Nc3 is better since White does not need to waste time with c4)
After 5. Nf3 as in CL's book we have a reasonable (topical variation) of the main line with 4...Nb6.
He discusses this very briefly, in several parts, under several move orders. In fact, I think that in more than half of the games in this chapter Black plays d6 instead of d5 (which is the Westerinen line where Black looks for a french type approach).
Thus, a connection to the main line with 4...Nb6 could be interesting and enlightening.
Also, this variation, with d6, is a land mine (although i think it can be played) and more topical games would have been welcome in a move by move book.
In fact "caveman" approaches based on a quick h4-h5 are also interesting and Black needs to know what to do otherwise it gets slaughtered (see two articles in NYC)

Thus, this was a disapointment to me more based on "an opportunity missed".

Anyway, this was a side comment on an otherwise nice "tour de force" book.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #44 - 03/15/14 at 22:46:43
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That makes sense. And against 10...Bg4 11.Be2 d5!? (given as note in my previous post), instead of the "automatic" 12.c5 (when something like 12...Nc8 13.b4 a6 14.a4 Nc6 15.b5 axb5 16.axb5 Na5 17.Bg5 doesn't look unplayable for Black) White can again play 12.h3 and grab the bishop pair for apparently not a lot.
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #43 - 03/15/14 at 13:34:24
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@Stigma, I did conclude that I did not want to play Bg4 until the central structure after d6-d5 and c4-c5 had been established. This is because if white does not play c4-c5 Rc1 is actually a useful move, but if white locks with c4-c5 the rook belongs on b1. After 10..Bg4 11.Be2 e6 13.h3 I don't particularly like blacks position.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #42 - 03/14/14 at 01:35:05
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@Ludde: I suppose you've already concluded that taking the tempo loss with ...Bg4 somewhere after 10.Nf3 is too slow? This has been played both by and against Nakamura, and I half-intended to play it in a club game recently (in the end I got worried about White's alternatives to the Voronezh with Bd3/Nge2 or h3/Nf3/Be2 and decided on ...exd6 instead). Maybe the way Nakamura played as White against Zinchenko, delaying castling to get on with b4-b5, is problematic? Black can avoid that with 11...e6, but it doesn't look like he had quite enough for the bishop pair against Baklan.



Edit: Actually, Nakamura-Zonchenko (which was merely a blitz game) did end up with the standard structure for this line after 19...a6 and 20...axb5, and probably something like 21...Nxe3 22.fxe3 e5 would have been perfectly OK for Black. But White could play 20.bxa6 instead and already have a protected passed pawn!

13...a6 was perhaps the solution for Black, though 14.b4 Nc6 15.b5 axb5 16.axb5 Na5 17.Bg5!? is a bit annoying - exploiting the tempo "saved" by delaying castling to make the necessary ...e6 harder to get in.
« Last Edit: 03/14/14 at 04:29:27 by Stigma »  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #41 - 03/13/14 at 23:10:52
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Paddy wrote on 03/13/14 at 13:04:57:
Although I only use the Alekhine as an occasional weapon these days, I retain an interest in the theory and decided I should buy the Lakdawala book, despite worries that he has been so productive recently that quality control might be suffering. I'm also not a great fan of his over-the-top style of writing, but O.K., there's usually some good chess sense hidden beneath the verbiage.

I've not read the book in detail yet, but I immediately turned to the chapter on the critical Voronezh line in the ...cxd6 exchange. I think the author makes a good case that 9...e5 is adequate (but Black needs to have done his homework) as has long been argued by Markovich here on the forum,  by Watson on Chess Publishing and by Cox in his (still) excellent book.

However, I was disappointed with Lakdawala's brief dismissal of 9...Bf5, which has been played by some strong players and has been discussed at some length here on the forum (but ignored on Chess Publishing). Lakdawala merely gives 10 d5, on the basis of 10...e5 11 g4 (Dvoiris-Steffens, Oberwart 2004) whereas in my opinion 10...e6!?is critical,  provoking 11 g4, which leads to a fascinatingly unbalanced game. See for instance

[Event "GBR-ch 97th"]
[Site "Canterbury"]
[Date "2010.07.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Adair, James"]
[Black "Tymrakiewicz, Rafal"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B03"]
[WhiteElo "2205"]
[BlackElo "2301"]
[PlyCount "136"]
[EventDate "2010.07.26"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "ENG"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2010.09.01"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. exd6 cxd6 6. Nc3 g6 7. Be3 Bg7 8. Rc1 O-O 9. b3 Bf5 10. d5 e6 11. g4 Bxc3+ 12. Rxc3 Be4 13. f3 Bxd5 14. cxd5 Nxd5 15. Rd3 Nc6 16. Rxd5 exd5 17. Ne2 Re8 18. Kf2 Rxe3 19. Kxe3 Qb6+ 20. Kf4 Qf2 21. Nc3 Re8 22. Nxd5 Re5 23. h4 Nd4 24. Nf6+ Kg7 25. g5 Ne6+ 26. Kg4 h5+ 27. gxh6+ Kxf6 28. Qxd6 Rf5 29. Qg3 Rf4+ 30. Qxf4+ Nxf4 31. Kxf4 Qxa2 32. Bc4 Qd2+ 33. Kg3 Qxh6 34. Rd1 Ke7 35. Re1+ Kf8 36. f4 Qg7 37. Re5 a6 38. Bd5 b5 39. Bc6 Qf6 40. Bf3 Qd6 41. h5 gxh5 42. Rxh5 Qg6+ 43. Kh4 Qd3 44. Bd5 Kg7 45. Rg5+ Kf6 46. Re5 Qc2 47. Kg4 a5 48. Kf3 Qd3+ 49. Kg4 a4 50. bxa4 bxa4 51. Bf3 a3 52. Ra5
Qg6+ 53. Kh3 Qd3 54. Kg4 Ke7 55. Bd5 f6 56. Ra7+ Kd6 57. Bf7 Kc5 58. Be6 Qg6+ 59. Kf3 Qd3+ 60. Kg4 Kb6 61. Rf7 Qg6+ 62. Kf3 f5 63. Bd5 Qg4+ 64. Ke3 Qg3+ 65. Bf3 a2 66. Rf6+ Ka7 67. Rf7+ Kb8 68. Rb7+ Kc8 0-1


I have played 9..Bf5 in a couple of correspondence games and thought I had found the "solution" to the Voronezh until I recently ran into 10.Nf3 d5 11.c5 Nc8 12.h3 Nc6 13.Be2 e6 14.O-O N8e7 15.g4 Be4 16.Ng5 Rb8 17.Qd2 h6 18.Ngxe4 dxe4 19.Rcd1. I will finally hold this game (actually we have reached a rook ending covered by tablebases, so I have no concerns any more - not about discussing the game either) but only after severe agony. The position here is not nice to play at all for black, and requires several "only moves". I seriously doubt it could be held between equals in an OTB game. So at the moment I think it is back to the old 9..e5 which is the only way to go. It is a shame really - in the other games I got nice play with this line, but the continuation above has closed the chapter on 9..Bf5 for me.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #40 - 03/13/14 at 13:53:37
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Hi, Paddy!
You are right - 9...Bf5 and 10...e6 is the path for black, imho.
I always thought of this move 7.Be3 as premature in this exact move order.
The white d4-pawn is not under attack after all. At least, for now.. So why this hurry with 7.Be3 - I don't know.  Roll Eyes
That's why 7.h3!? Bg7 8.Nf3 0-0 9.Be2 Nc6 10.0-0 Bf5 11.Re1 was always my choice for white.  Wink
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #39 - 03/13/14 at 13:31:59
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That looks fun Smiley

Not some random 2200 losing either of course. Adair is over 2400 now and is a rather skilled chaos merchant with it.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #38 - 03/13/14 at 13:04:57
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Although I only use the Alekhine as an occasional weapon these days, I retain an interest in the theory and decided I should buy the Lakdawala book, despite worries that he has been so productive recently that quality control might be suffering. I'm also not a great fan of his over-the-top style of writing, but O.K., there's usually some good chess sense hidden beneath the verbiage.

I've not read the book in detail yet, but I immediately turned to the chapter on the critical Voronezh line in the ...cxd6 exchange. I think the author makes a good case that 9...e5 is adequate (but Black needs to have done his homework) as has long been argued by Markovich here on the forum,  by Watson on Chess Publishing and by Cox in his (still) excellent book.

However, I was disappointed with Lakdawala's brief dismissal of 9...Bf5, which has been played by some strong players and has been discussed at some length here on the forum (but ignored on Chess Publishing). Lakdawala merely gives 10 d5, on the basis of 10...e5 11 g4 (Dvoiris-Steffens, Oberwart 2004) whereas in my opinion 10...e6!?is critical,  provoking 11 g4, which leads to a fascinatingly unbalanced game. See for instance

[Event "GBR-ch 97th"]
[Site "Canterbury"]
[Date "2010.07.30"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Adair, James"]
[Black "Tymrakiewicz, Rafal"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B03"]
[WhiteElo "2205"]
[BlackElo "2301"]
[PlyCount "136"]
[EventDate "2010.07.26"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "ENG"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2010.09.01"]

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. exd6 cxd6 6. Nc3 g6 7. Be3 Bg7 8. Rc1 O-O 9. b3 Bf5 10. d5 e6 11. g4 Bxc3+ 12. Rxc3 Be4 13. f3 Bxd5 14. cxd5 Nxd5 15. Rd3 Nc6 16. Rxd5 exd5 17. Ne2 Re8 18. Kf2 Rxe3 19. Kxe3 Qb6+ 20. Kf4 Qf2 21. Nc3 Re8 22. Nxd5 Re5 23. h4 Nd4 24. Nf6+ Kg7 25. g5 Ne6+ 26. Kg4 h5+ 27. gxh6+ Kxf6 28. Qxd6 Rf5 29. Qg3 Rf4+ 30. Qxf4+ Nxf4 31. Kxf4 Qxa2 32. Bc4 Qd2+ 33. Kg3 Qxh6 34. Rd1 Ke7 35. Re1+ Kf8 36. f4 Qg7 37. Re5 a6 38. Bd5 b5 39. Bc6 Qf6 40. Bf3 Qd6 41. h5 gxh5 42. Rxh5 Qg6+ 43. Kh4 Qd3 44. Bd5 Kg7 45. Rg5+ Kf6 46. Re5 Qc2 47. Kg4 a5 48. Kf3 Qd3+ 49. Kg4 a4 50. bxa4 bxa4 51. Bf3 a3 52. Ra5
Qg6+ 53. Kh3 Qd3 54. Kg4 Ke7 55. Bd5 f6 56. Ra7+ Kd6 57. Bf7 Kc5 58. Be6 Qg6+ 59. Kf3 Qd3+ 60. Kg4 Kb6 61. Rf7 Qg6+ 62. Kf3 f5 63. Bd5 Qg4+ 64. Ke3 Qg3+ 65. Bf3 a2 66. Rf6+ Ka7 67. Rf7+ Kb8 68. Rb7+ Kc8 0-1
  

Bf5_01.pgn ( 1 KB | Downloads )
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #37 - 03/08/14 at 22:56:56
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I think he suggests

4...dxe5 5. Nxe5 c6 and after
i) 6.Be2 Bf5 7.OO Nd7 8. Nf3 e6 9.c4 N5f6 10. Nc3 Bd6, at least this is what has been played by Miroschnichenko
also he analyses 7. g4 and 8.Bg4 (based on the games) but not sure what are the main suggestions

ii) after Bc4 it appears he recommends a transposition to the Kengis (again based on games)

iii) Bd3, not sure what line he suggests since he gives the Topalov-Carlsen game and Topalov played not the best move after 6...Nd7 7.NxN?!
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #36 - 03/08/14 at 20:30:34
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Zatara wrote on 03/08/14 at 20:12:29:
I mean 4.nf3 as classical and his 5...c6 
Thanks
Z


I'm waiting for my copy to be delivered, and i'm not really strong enough to say whether his line is good or not, however the line in question with c6 is probably the main line in that variation at the highest level so it should be fine ( i think Adams, Ivanchuk and Carlsen have all played it when facing the classical variation).
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #35 - 03/08/14 at 20:12:29
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I mean 4.nf3 as classical and his 5...c6 
Thanks
Z
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #34 - 03/08/14 at 19:23:38
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Zatara wrote on 03/07/14 at 02:22:03:
Hi Guys,
Did Lakadowala really make the exchange with cxd6 viable as he says he did in the MOve by Move book???
Thanks,
Marc
Ps. is his line vs the classical pretty good??


He has about 80 pages on this line, most of it showing (or attempting to show) that Black is Ok after
the Voronezh. He mentions John Watson's analysis, some of them published here. Since I was vaguely involved I think this may hold. Not clear however, if it is "human-viable" or "engine-viable".

I am looking forward to the book since it looks interesting, at least what I could see from the pages in Amazon.

What do you mean by the "classical"?
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #33 - 03/07/14 at 13:52:39
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Hi Bibs,
No I am another Marc.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #32 - 03/07/14 at 04:16:19
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Zatara wrote on 03/07/14 at 02:22:03:
Hi Guys,
Did Lakadowala really make the exchange with cxd6 viable as he says he did in the MOve by Move book???
Thanks,
Marc
Ps. is his line vs the classical pretty good??


I am not sure the book is out yet, is it?
Are you also the person who posts as Marc Benford by the way?
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #31 - 03/07/14 at 02:22:03
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Hi Guys,
Did Lakadowala really make the exchange with cxd6 viable as he says he did in the MOve by Move book???
Thanks,
Marc
Ps. is his line vs the classical pretty good??
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #30 - 02/05/14 at 05:15:43
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lg wrote on 02/04/14 at 21:28:47:
Puzzled because it is there.

Go to amazom.com, get the page of the book and click on the front page (left on the webpage)


sorry for the confusion. I meant that i had looked the day before you posted, but it wasnt up at that point.

I saw your post yesterday and  went back to amazon and looked at the look inside feature as it was now up, just as you said it was. Smiley
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #29 - 02/04/14 at 21:28:47
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Puzzled because it is there.

Go to amazom.com, get the page of the book and click on the front page (left on the webpage)
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #28 - 02/04/14 at 21:14:02
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lg wrote on 02/03/14 at 22:27:58:
Hi

In Amazon.com the option "look inside" is available.
We can see parts of the book, and at the end a list of all the games in the book plus the variations studied


Went on Amazon last night to see if they had the look inside feature available yet, and they didnt Sad missed it by 24 hours  Cheesy

It covers d5 against 2nc3 so i'm happy  Wink It also makes sense given he the line he covers below....

The Westerinen line looks familiar now that i've had a look at it again. Not sure where i have seen it before, maybe it was in Burgess's complete Alekhine...but again like the d5 line above, he appears to be using it to transfer to a french like structure...

Glad to see he includes around 8 of his own games as black in this even though 6 are rapid games from last year. A lot of recognisable names playing black in this too.

Really looking forward to this...
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #27 - 02/03/14 at 22:27:58
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Hi

In Amazon.com the option "look inside" is available.
We can see parts of the book, and at the end a list of all the games in the book plus the variations studied
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #26 - 01/29/14 at 19:34:15
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Yes, in the Megadatabase there are many games by Westerinen after
1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.c4 Nb6 !?
and I have seen a few old books calling this the "Westerinen" line, or at least saying that it is often played by him

Apparently the main lines are
4. Nf3 d5 (the main idea)
and
4.a4 a5 5.Nf3 d5

There are also two games by Alburt, one against a computer.

Well, although i was not expecting this line, it may make sense in a repertoire book where in the main line Miles, most of the positions are +/= (and i dont want to enter a discussion whether 4...g6 or something else was playable).

Not clear however, what is the "emphasis" on the line.
Whether a sound alternative to the main line or as a kind of surprise weapon.

A recent article on the line is given by Valeri Lilov in Chessabase magazine 138.

  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #25 - 01/28/14 at 23:46:13
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On chessgames.com I found three games where Westerinen faced 4 Nf3, he played Bg4 once and g6 twice.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #24 - 01/28/14 at 23:38:25
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RoleyPoley wrote on 01/28/14 at 22:33:02:
as for the westerinen line i havent a clue. I dont think i have heard of it before. It's a very big chapter too so it must be a line we would probably recognise but only know it by a different name...


well, i was mistaken i think it refers to
1.e4 Nf6 2.e5 Nd5 3.d4 Nb6
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #23 - 01/28/14 at 22:44:51
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gwnn wrote on 01/28/14 at 22:30:01:
At the risk of nitpicking, the Alekhine was also famously played in 1935 in the Alekhine-Euwe match ... by Euwe.


yes, and furthermore mentioned in several recent books on the Alekhine; seems to me to be a first "bad" spot on the upcoming book

RoleyPoley wrote on 01/28/14 at 22:33:02:
Yes,

as for the westerinen line i havent a clue. I dont think i have heard of it before. It's a very big chapter too so it must be a line we would probably recognise but only know it by a different name...


perhaps 4...c6

I am really interested to see his analysis on Voronezh
(thanks dfan). I remember quite well the threads made here with lots of analysis on this line by several members, notably by Markovich and still remember his title on the analysis sequences "defanging the Voronezh" which was nice at a time when many books where using similar titles,e.g., "slaying the dragon", etc.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #22 - 01/28/14 at 22:33:02
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Yes, good to see Baburin's games will feature. He was one of the few standard bearers of the opening in the 90's.

as for the westerinen line i havent a clue. I dont think i have heard of it before. It's a very big chapter too so it must be a line we would probably recognise but only know it by a different name...
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #21 - 01/28/14 at 22:30:01
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At the risk of nitpicking, the Alekhine was also famously played in 1935 in the Alekhine-Euwe match ... by Euwe.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #20 - 01/28/14 at 21:55:15
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lg wrote on 01/28/14 at 20:27:16:
well, i am glad he brings back the Verezhnov (not sure about the spelling)

Voronezh.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #19 - 01/28/14 at 20:27:16
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well, i am glad he brings back the Verezhnov (not sure about the spelling) and defends the black side on this line

also that he mentiones Baburin and that he is following many of his suggestions; it makes sense to follow the games of someone that consistently plays the line

the 2nd chapter is titled "the Westerinen's Anti Main line" any idea what this is?

one first criticism - he says that Spassky-Fischer 13th
was the first Alekhine played in a WC!
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #18 - 01/28/14 at 20:16:32
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lg wrote on 01/28/14 at 17:23:06:
a pdf is already available in everymanchess.com

no surprises about the choice against the main line;
the Miles

two surprises, however:
i) the choice of Sergev's line against the 4PA(same as Taylor's choice); i was disapointed but i must confess there is a point to this
ii) in the Exchange, besides the current usual exd6, he also devotes some time to cxd6 because J Watson says in chesspublishing.com that the line is playable against the Vorozhnev !!


thanks for alerting us to the pdf now being up. Shame that we cant tell what all the lines he covers are from it though... Undecided

I initially wasnt surprised at the chosen line against the 4PA as its fairly thematic and avoids a lot of theory in the main lines...but thinking about it more now,  and given his background with the opening he would have been well placed to provide an alternative line.

I am surprised to see him as a Cxd player in the exchange and that he is covering this line, although i am glad.

John Cox i think has also been saying for quite a while that he felt that it was still playable . 


  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #17 - 01/28/14 at 17:23:06
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a pdf is already available in everymanchess.com

no surprises about the choice against the main line;
the Miles

two surprises, however:
i) the choice of Sergev's line against the 4PA(same as Taylor's choice); i was disapointed but i must confess there is a point to this
ii) in the Exchange, besides the current usual exd6, he also devotes some time to cxd6 because J Watson says in chesspublishing.com that the line is playable against the Vorozhnev !!
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #16 - 01/18/14 at 20:31:10
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lg wrote on 01/18/14 at 15:19:48:
thanks for the discussion

here is more:

i) if you go to the chessgames.com you find two of his games, probably the most famous ones one loss where he plays 4...c6 5.Be2 Bg4 and one win agains the chase. This appears to be a "famous" game since he makes a sacrífice at the end.

to see others, use Google and you may find a few more

ii) I have mixed feelings about Taylor's book. Essentially, i dont understand some of his choices and really dislike his assertive way of writing (mor eon this below.
I did not dislike his 2. Nc3 chapter. It was informative to me (in the sense that if I fel like playing 2...e5, I will have a look at it and also at relevant books on e4.e5
His choices on minor chapters are odd. The striking exemple for me is the chapter on 4.Bc4.
Concerning the 4PA, what you mean by "hiding the critical line"?? "Hiding" means he knows about it and on purpose is not putting it in, right?
I dont like his algoritmic approach for the Exchange, If he plays this you answer this, etc. I would rather have good explanations to make me suggest the same algorithm, if I agree, right?
Also his positive/negative way of writing is odd. When he says correct (it appears that anything else is wrong) or incorrect (and then you see good players
playing it and doing well).
One example is 6...Nc6 in the Exchange (which by the way makes sense to me). But i have seen good playes playing 6...Be7 at once and allowing the Bd3 Ne2 approach for White and doing well.

However for me the two striking examples arise in the 4.Nf3 lines

In the Miles line he says that "Carlsen developped  an importante strategical improvement" when referring to 6...Bf5 in the 6.Be2 line??
I can quote a few players that played this much earlier, eg., Nigel Short.
However, it is not clear to me why 6...Bf5 is better thna the old Miles line with 6...Nd7 and it is in such cases where explanative ideas might be worth having.
Also, in these two variations, I can pose similar questions arising on moves 8 and 9, etc.

In the main line of the Kengis he says that 9...Be6 is
"accurate...but look what happens to Adamas when he plays the less precise 9...Nd7". And later on he says that this move is "an important mistake".
This important mistake has been played by several "Alekhine" players including Larsen's win against Westerinen (who has two game sin this chaper, Miroschnichenko, etc.
Taylor's explanations of why this is  a mistake are not clear to me (in fact, i am not sure he adds any).

I am one of those that thinks Cox's book há snot been improved.
However, two quick comments.

I like Bogdanov's book. My main criticism here is the
choice of games in the Miles lines that makes the author spend only a few lines on the main lines.

And in terms of explanative ideas and motivations my vote still goes to the introductions of each chapter on New ideas in the Alekhine by Burguess.



Thanks for the game suggestions i will have a look later.

I agree that Taylor's writing is let down with his dismissive style. his explanations of things he likes is good, those that he doesnt is not so good. A better work would provide quality explanations for both as you have pointed out with the nd7 line. I think Lakdawala's positive style is likely to be better for this.

Yes, perhaps hiding was not the correct wording. But, according to some of the reviews i read, the Nc3 & Be3 lines white plays against 5...g6 in the 4 pawn are the most important for the variation and the reviewers felt that Taylor glossed over how difficult they were for Black to face. While he does call the moves critical, if he is down playing the difficulties black faces against that line it is a concern, and it is unlikely that he wouldnt know which were the problematic ones. I cant remember the reviews, other than NM Mcleary's on Chessville which i cant find now due to the site being down.

I'm also glad to hear that Lakdawala was close friend of Tony Miles. I think the latter never really got the recognition that he probably deserved and it would be great if the new book was infused with games that displayed the spirit of Miles.

I had thought of moving away from the Alekhine next season and playing the French or something, but this thread is making me rethink my plan...
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #15 - 01/18/14 at 17:39:36
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ErictheRed wrote on 01/18/14 at 15:58:56:
I have no inside knowledge, but Cyrus and Tony Miles were very good friends, and I suspect that we'll see a lot of Miles' ideas in the book.  They worked together on a lot of openings in the old days. 


ps: well, the only game Miles against the 4PA in the database , he plays the main line variation
9...Qd7 10.Be2 OOO 11. OO Kb8 !?
recently mentioned by Tom Rendle in his latest post

this variation has been discussed by some of us in another (long) thread

curious is the fact that on the game
Kotronias-Short Gibraltar 2003, New in Chess 2003, nº2, where Short played the old 11...f6 ?! (?), the commentator says "Wohl himself claimed to have on four occasions played 11...Kb8, with he and the late Tony Miles having looked at stuff such as 12 a4 Bb4!?"

this was also discussed in the thread

somehow I dont beleive we will see this in his book
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #14 - 01/18/14 at 16:39:24
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ErictheRed wrote on 01/18/14 at 15:58:56:
I have no inside knowledge, but Cyrus and Tony Miles were very good friends, and I suspect that we'll see a lot of Miles' ideas in the book.  They worked together on a lot of openings in the old days. 


I hope so !!! Smiley
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #13 - 01/18/14 at 15:58:56
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I have no inside knowledge, but Cyrus and Tony Miles were very good friends, and I suspect that we'll see a lot of Miles' ideas in the book.  They worked together on a lot of openings in the old days.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #12 - 01/18/14 at 15:19:48
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thanks for the discussion

here is more:

i) if you go to the chessgames.com you find two of his games, probably the most famous ones one loss where he plays 4...c6 5.Be2 Bg4 and one win agains the chase. This appears to be a "famous" game since he makes a sacrífice at the end.

to see others, use Google and you may find a few more

ii) I have mixed feelings about Taylor's book. Essentially, i dont understand some of his choices and really dislike his assertive way of writing (mor eon this below.
I did not dislike his 2. Nc3 chapter. It was informative to me (in the sense that if I fel like playing 2...e5, I will have a look at it and also at relevant books on e4.e5
His choices on minor chapters are odd. The striking exemple for me is the chapter on 4.Bc4.
Concerning the 4PA, what you mean by "hiding the critical line"?? "Hiding" means he knows about it and on purpose is not putting it in, right?
I dont like his algoritmic approach for the Exchange, If he plays this you answer this, etc. I would rather have good explanations to make me suggest the same algorithm, if I agree, right?
Also his positive/negative way of writing is odd. When he says correct (it appears that anything else is wrong) or incorrect (and then you see good players
playing it and doing well).
One example is 6...Nc6 in the Exchange (which by the way makes sense to me). But i have seen good playes playing 6...Be7 at once and allowing the Bd3 Ne2 approach for White and doing well.

However for me the two striking examples arise in the 4.Nf3 lines

In the Miles line he says that "Carlsen developped  an importante strategical improvement" when referring to 6...Bf5 in the 6.Be2 line??
I can quote a few players that played this much earlier, eg., Nigel Short.
However, it is not clear to me why 6...Bf5 is better thna the old Miles line with 6...Nd7 and it is in such cases where explanative ideas might be worth having.
Also, in these two variations, I can pose similar questions arising on moves 8 and 9, etc.

In the main line of the Kengis he says that 9...Be6 is
"accurate...but look what happens to Adamas when he plays the less precise 9...Nd7". And later on he says that this move is "an important mistake".
This important mistake has been played by several "Alekhine" players including Larsen's win against Westerinen (who has two game sin this chaper, Miroschnichenko, etc.
Taylor's explanations of why this is  a mistake are not clear to me (in fact, i am not sure he adds any).

I am one of those that thinks Cox's book há snot been improved.
However, two quick comments.

I like Bogdanov's book. My main criticism here is the
choice of games in the Miles lines that makes the author spend only a few lines on the main lines.

And in terms of explanative ideas and motivations my vote still goes to the introductions of each chapter on New ideas in the Alekhine by Burguess.







  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #11 - 01/18/14 at 13:29:48
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What other lines has he played? i havent got games after 2010 on my database and i cant find any by him.

I thought the books were aimed for players between 1500-2000, which if correct would mean a lower average than 2000+

If so, then it should clearly be geared to what players are likely to face, with perhaps some reference to what is played by the best players (perhaps an explanation as to why the difference?). This was something that i liked in some of Taylor's chapters. I also dont think that a good chapter or two on 2nc3 options has to come at the expense of the chapters on nf3 material.

However, While i liked Taylor's book, his treatment of the 2nc3 line for me was very disappointing and although i use the line he gave for the four pawn, he did get some flack for hiding the critical line ( even the player he uses as the role model for the line i think only played about 5 games with it, and the last was about 5 or 6 years ago which raises further questions as to why).

While the Alekhine is hardly played now, i think that is in someways of benefit to the publisher as a lot of players like to catch their opponent by surprise...It has probably never had a particularly large following at club level and from looking at games in the leagues i play in, it seems that players are now using a wider range of lines in the French, Caro-Kann and Scandanavian as black, which when added to sicilian and e5 options mean that white players opening with e4 are under more pressure to learn lines against those and therefore are not going to spend much if any time learning the Alekhine.

Also a well written book could prove profitable, if it is successful in increasing the interest of the Alekhine at club level it could increase the chances of a more detailed Alekhine book for stronger players to follow. Despite the Taylor and Bogdanov books being released since Cox's book came out, i think a lot of interested readers still feel that Cox's book hasnt been improved upon.

There are a lot more books on the other openings, and they are probably harder to write in a move by move format. More likely to be split into variations of the openings i would guess (there is already that book by collins on the Tarrasch for example) I wouldnt be surprised though if Everyman already have some of them lined up for future release!
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #10 - 01/18/14 at 12:01:03
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i) I mentioned 4...Bg4 5Be2 c6 because he has played it several times, also under the move order 4...c6 5Be2 Bg4 (and here I dont understand this because with the first move order Black reduces White's options). But I hope we see the Miles, old and new.

ii) The main question in a repertoire book for an audience with average 2200 (2000?) Elo is to know
whether the material should be divided by
a) what is best according to the best players
or
b) what is generally played by players of 2200

At first sight one may be inclined to choice b) but does it make sense to have more pages on 2.Nc3 than on 4.Nf3?
Also the best choice for variations and subvariations helps you to become better at chess, i think.

iii) Funny is that Taylor's book is a repertoire book.
This is also a repertoire book. Does it make sense to publish one after the other with a 2 year interval?
The Alekhine is seldom played. Will the book sell?
I am looking forward to the book but as a publisher
shouldnt I be asking for a Move by Move book
in the QG accepted, another on the QC declined;
anothe ron the Kings' indian, even one on the Dutch,
SOME on variation sof the Ruy Lopes, etc?

iv) anyway book was delayed


according
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #9 - 01/15/14 at 23:40:51
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lg wrote on 01/15/14 at 21:31:03:
RoleyPoley wrote on 01/13/14 at 00:26:59:
Anyone heard anything about what lines will be in this book?

I hope its not another one of those books that recommends 2....e5 against 2 Nc3.....but if he does, then i hope he actually provides a proper set of lines to enable the reader to play it...


After 4. Nf3 i think he would suggest either 4...c6, 4...dxe5 5. Nxe5 c6 or 4...Bg4 5.Be2 c6

These are lines which are worth a book with good comments (such as the ones he does in the his Slav book).
Sincerely, I would prefer the first two.

Concerning 2.Nc3 e5 in case it is his choice, then I would prefer a "pointer" to 1e4e5 books and not waste pages with such lines.
I would not mind "lines I dont recommend" with updated games (which is not the case of Taylor's book).


I would agree that the c6 or dxe5, c6 line is likely to be picked. I would be surprised at the Bg4 line as i thought that had been viewed as unfavourable for black for quite a few years.

It seems pointless having e5 as a recommendation against 2. Nc3 if lines arent given simply because low graded players like myself face 2.Nc3 more than any other move so the book would be otherwise fairly redundant. In  5+ years of playing the Alekhine regularly i've only played against the modern variation once, and the four pawns attack maybe 3 times and the chase variation twice. Everyone else seems to go for the Exchange (maybe because it is given in most of the repertoire books) or Nc3..

Instead of e5, i would prefer to see the d5 line that allows a transposition into a french set up (I think according to Cox, this was Alekhine's preference), that in many cases wont be the line that white would normally play and for black would be a position they could become quite familiar with fairly quickly.

I think Lakdawala wrote a book on the four knights so i would guess he could provide a couple of chapters for the e5 repertoire if thats the path he goes down.

  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #8 - 01/15/14 at 21:31:03
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RoleyPoley wrote on 01/13/14 at 00:26:59:
Anyone heard anything about what lines will be in this book?

I hope its not another one of those books that recommends 2....e5 against 2 Nc3.....but if he does, then i hope he actually provides a proper set of lines to enable the reader to play it...


After 4. Nf3 i think he would suggest either 4...c6, 4...dxe5 5. Nxe5 c6 or 4...Bg4 5.Be2 c6

These are lines which are worth a book with good comments (such as the ones he does in the his Slav book).
Sincerely, I would prefer the first two.

Concerning 2.Nc3 e5 in case it is his choice, then I would prefer a "pointer" to 1e4e5 books and not waste pages with such lines.
I would not mind "lines I dont recommend" with updated games (which is not the case of Taylor's book).
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #7 - 01/13/14 at 00:26:59
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Anyone heard anything about what lines will be in this book?

I hope its not another one of those books that recommends 2....e5 against 2 Nc3.....but if he does, then i hope he actually provides a proper set of lines to enable the reader to play it...
  

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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #6 - 12/08/13 at 13:06:33
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Fllg wrote on 12/08/13 at 12:15:20:
But I´m afraid the price one has to pay for writing so many books is some kind of superficiality, which is covered by an ´entertaining´ writing style.

Admittedly I have only read one of his books. It has 400 pages and I guess it would have been easy to cut 100 of them out.


I completely agree with you that the sheer volume of the author's output must affect the quality of the content, and I don't doubt that a lot of his humorous asides could be edited – or even edited out. My suspicion is that these books are aimed at a relatively new sort of readership: people who perhaps play a bit online and would like to improve their understanding, but who would feel intimidated by pages of dense variations. Because Lakdawala's books contain large amounts of prose – and lots of light-hearted non-technical prose at that – they are perhaps appealing to this readership. In the light of this, it doesn't really matter that much whether the books are as theoretically rigorous as, say, an Avrukh tome, as long as they get the basic ideas across. This is pure speculation, of course, but I'm reluctant to be too critical of these books as there's clearly some sort of market for them, even though neither I, nor apparently you, form part of this market.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #5 - 12/08/13 at 12:15:20
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Seeley wrote on 12/08/13 at 00:44:23:
I don't really think this author has any pretensions to blazing new theoretical trails: he's simply trying to make the subjects he writes about accessible to less experienced players.


And that´s perfectly fine. But I´m afraid the price one has to pay for writing so many books is some kind of superficiality, which is covered by an ´entertaining´ writing style.

Admittedly I have only read one of his books. It has 400 pages and I guess it would have been easy to cut 100 of them out.

Of course that´s just my opinion and you are right that Everyman wouldn´t publish them if they didn´t sell well.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #4 - 12/08/13 at 10:43:35
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Seeley wrote on 12/08/13 at 00:44:23:
Fllg wrote on 12/08/13 at 00:07:03:
it would be very surprising to me if this author has anything to say about the Alekhine you don´t already know. Unless you are a complete novice to the opening

Judging from what I've seen of his books, that's precisely the market that's being targeted. I don't really think this author has any pretensions to blazing new theoretical trails: he's simply trying to make the subjects he writes about accessible to less experienced players. His idiosyncratic style certainly divides opinion, but whatever anyone thinks of it, I'm guessing his books must sell quite well, or else presumably Everyman wouldn't continue to publish so many of them.


Yes, probably it is.
However, I must confess I do not dislike some of his Move-by Move books (even like his on the Slav).
My point is that the best (by far) latest Alekhine book is still the one by John Cox and might be interesting to see a new explanative book on topical lines such as 4...c6 or 4...dxe5 5.Nxe5 c6 after 4Nf3
Not sure he will sugegst this though
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #3 - 12/08/13 at 00:44:23
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Fllg wrote on 12/08/13 at 00:07:03:
it would be very surprising to me if this author has anything to say about the Alekhine you don´t already know. Unless you are a complete novice to the opening

Judging from what I've seen of his books, that's precisely the market that's being targeted. I don't really think this author has any pretensions to blazing new theoretical trails: he's simply trying to make the subjects he writes about accessible to less experienced players. His idiosyncratic style certainly divides opinion, but whatever anyone thinks of it, I'm guessing his books must sell quite well, or else presumably Everyman wouldn't continue to publish so many of them.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #2 - 12/08/13 at 00:07:03
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I wouldn´t hold my breath about this one and it would be very surprising to me if this author has anything to say about the Alekhine you don´t already know. Unless you are a complete novice to the opening.

At least that´s my own impression after reading his book about the Modern Defence and from the opinions I have read about his other titles. Of which there are way to many written in a fairly short period of time, which is not a good sign to me.
  
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Re: The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
Reply #1 - 12/07/13 at 15:34:17
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In Everyman book publication has been pushed to Jan in Europe

Anyone has suggestion on which lines will appear?

Also, I have seen in other topics and thread that authors give a "hint" of what will appear.
  
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The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
10/18/13 at 18:43:58
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one wonders which lines would be chosen

The Alekhine Defence: Move by Move
by Cyrus Lakdawala

This series provides an ideal platform to study chess openings. By continually challenging the reader to answer probing questions throughout the book, the Move by Move format greatly encourages the learning and practising of vital skills just as much as the traditional assimilation of opening knowledge. Carefully selected questions and answers are designed to keep you actively involved and allow you to monitor your progress as you learn. This is an excellent way to study any chess opening and at the same time improve your general chess skills and knowledge. In this book, International Master Cyrus Lakdawala invites you to join him in studying the Alekhine Defence. Black's idea in the Alekhine Defence is a bold one. By inviting White's central pawns to advance, Black hopes later on to undermine and demolish White's centre. This ambitious strategy appeals to players who enjoy sharp lines and positional imbalances. Using illustrative games, Lakdawala outlines a reliable repertoire for Black, examines the main positional and tactical ideas for both sides, provides answers to all the key questions and tells you everything you need to know about successfully playing the Alekhine Defence. *Essential guidance and training in the Alekhine Defence *Presents a repertoire for Black with 1 e4 Nf6 *Utilizes an ideal approach to chess study
  
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