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Normal Topic classical variation 11.Bd2...13.c4 0-0 14.Kb1 b5!? (Read 1394 times)
Chris
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Re: classical variation 11.Bd2...13.c4 0-0 14.Kb1 b5!?
Reply #3 - 06/13/15 at 07:15:12
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Thanks for the help. I did a bit more analysis and realize now that I haven't really missed anything, but the compensation for the pawn sac is long term initiative and the d5 square as both have said. As for why white doesn't take on a5, it's more of the same really and it might just be that I'm a bit weak at 19xx to feel fully comfortable there down two pawns. Hopefully I'll get a real chance to experiment at some point.
  
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Re: classical variation 11.Bd2...13.c4 0-0 14.Kb1 b5!?
Reply #2 - 06/12/15 at 19:26:31
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I play this variation and sacrifying the pawn on b5 is normal because that d5 square is lost by White forever and that isolated d-pawn is nothing more than a weakness. The open files are like a Wolga Gambit except that in this case White's pawns are all further back (except h0pawn, which is most likely going to fall after a ...Tb5).

You cannot think about it in terms of concrete lines, because the compensation lasts even in the endgame. Also worthy to note that in the middlegame the open files point directly at the White king.

There is a similar position from Tromsø where Elizabeth Päthz lost after a ...b5 against Valentina Gunina. It was a positional outplay.
  
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Re: classical variation 11.Bd2...13.c4 0-0 14.Kb1 b5!?
Reply #1 - 06/12/15 at 15:50:27
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Hello.


This is the game I take it. Looks pretty much like a model game from black. White can probably play significantly better though 17.Ne5 for example creates an additional weakness and is therefore likely not best.

I imagine the key to being sucessful with black after 16.Qxb5 is just playing on like you are not overly concerned with being a pawn down. After all the extra pawn is the b-pawn which is not going anywhere. Also black got a few nice positional pluses from the b5 sacrifice (Open lines, Strongpoint on d5, a potentially useable a-pawn)

Have a nice day.
  
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Chris
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classical variation 11.Bd2...13.c4 0-0 14.Kb1 b5!?
06/12/15 at 10:10:05
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Following Schandorff, I have been studying closely the 11.Bd2 lines as many of the Chinese players I compete with play this line. Schandorff gives 13.c4 as a side line as offers a pawn sacrifice with 14...b5 to open lines on the queenside.

I am having a hard time identifying the compensation following the example game Ganguly - Jakovenko Spain 2008. That game proceeded 14.Kb1 b5 15.cxb5 cxb5 16.Qxb5 a5!? 17.Ne5 Nxe5 18.dxe5 Nd5 19.Ne2 (what's the idea here?) Rb8 and 20.Qc6 is given although I don't understand what is wrong with 20.Qxa5.

Would appreciate if anyone could share some practical comments on this line and any variations for black. I like the idea of playing b5 and sacrificing the pawn but I don't quite see the concrete compensation.
  
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