Latest Updates:
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 
Topic Tools
Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Yusupovís 9 Book Series (Read 13676 times)
JonathanB
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 430
Location: London
Joined: 11/17/07
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #26 - 02/09/17 at 12:19:15
Post Tools
Gerry1970 wrote on 02/07/17 at 00:25:19:
...  Long and the short of it is it become more like work and less like fun. So I quit. So I am back with a healthier attitude I think and going through the Yusupov books.

...


I am also working on my process at the board in terms of concentration.



Iím sure thatís why improvement is so difficult - the process isnít fun particularly.  Not sure thatís particularly unique to chess though. When I complained to my piano teacher that Iíd had to really slog my way through learning a piece, she said that was just how learning to play the piano is.

I suppose it has to be like that really. Not many people - as per the previous posterís comment - like being wrong all the time but to improve you have to put yourself in that position.

If it wasn't like that weíd all by Grandmasters and concert pianists, I guess.


Btw:
Part of my motivation of trying to focus on Yusupov and work my way through the books is the concentration practice.

  

www.streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com† "I don't call you f**k face" - GM Nigel Short.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
JonathanB
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 430
Location: London
Joined: 11/17/07
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #25 - 02/09/17 at 12:14:27
Post Tools
RoleyPoley wrote on 02/05/17 at 20:51:14:
what would you recommend for 1500s instead?



Well iím a bit late to this and I donít have too much I can say anyway. Iíve used Step 1 and 2 a lot - I teach beginners - and itís very good. I didnít know the later Steps got so advanced but given what people say above Iíd definitely suggest theyíre worth checking out.

Itís not just the Steps material per se, itís the method that I thinks work well. Puzzle and active thinking based, generates concrete results data to track progress and allows things like Axel Smithís Woodpecker Method.

The only possible downside might be I thought they were designed to be used in groups with a teacher. They arenít any answer books, I believe, which may prove tricky if youíre working on your own.

Or maybe thatís just how I use them.
  

www.streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com† "I don't call you f**k face" - GM Nigel Short.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Gerry1970
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 480
Joined: 02/01/06
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #24 - 02/07/17 at 00:25:19
Post Tools
JonathanB wrote on 02/05/17 at 14:33:39:
...
Anwyay, Iíve picked up a fair amount of knowledge along the way - e.g. endgame theory and I recognised certain test positions (Morphy at the Opera crops us - and thereís a position fro the first Alekhine - Capablanca game for instance). What I lack, I think, is the skill to apply this knowledge.

I donít think Im rushing too much yet but Iíll certainly have to slow down later. What i do need is to work out how best to work with the books. I think Iím too fond of the tactics chapters. Its easy to feel youíre making progress by completing those.


Lots in your post but the bold really resonated with me. In the past I have made what I thought was a serious study attempt including using a spaced repetition system. Long and the short of it is it become more like work and less like fun. So I quit. So I am back with a healthier attitude I think and going through the Yusupov books.

Because there is so much in these books I am slowly adding the positions to a spaced repetition system to help recall. And it is interesting to see which positions I struggle with etc.

Still I wonder about applying this knowledge! It seems that I get so few of the positions on the board! (But then again I am only starting Book 2 so that could get better.)

I am also working on my process at the board in terms of concentration, etc. It is helpful that others are going through the Yusupov books as it acts as inspiration in a way.

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
ReneDescartes
God Member
*****
Offline


Qu'est-ce donc que je
suis? Une chose qui pense.

Posts: 856
Joined: 05/18/10
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #23 - 02/06/17 at 19:11:47
Post Tools
No, no, you're right--I just remembered the levels from the website wrong. But I think the description of the difference is still accurate.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Straggler
Full Member
***
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 238
Location: London
Joined: 08/09/09
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #22 - 02/06/17 at 18:31:09
Post Tools
ReneDescartes wrote on 02/06/17 at 14:11:21:
One striking difference between the Steps and the Yusupov series is that the solutions in the Steps books are nearly all 3 moves or less,† all the way through† Step 4 (up to 1850 ELO/1950 USCF).

Is that your own assessment of the level of Step 4? Chess-steps.com gives < USCF 1750 for Step 4, and 1900 for Step 5. But I've also seen it said that Step 5 is for < Elo 1900.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
ReneDescartes
God Member
*****
Offline


Qu'est-ce donc que je
suis? Une chose qui pense.

Posts: 856
Joined: 05/18/10
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #21 - 02/06/17 at 14:11:21
Post Tools
It often seems to me that when passing from composed positions to positions from real games, for example in Blokh, that the real positions are somehow made with "reinforced concrete"--the pieces guard each other better, many possibilities are closed off, a kind of general prophylaxis chokes the board like smoke from the preceding battle, and even if there is a clean combination, there is a thick, tangled quality to the position. The student must cut through the "fog of war." This is the natural home of calculation.

One striking difference between the Steps and the Yusupov series is that the solutions in the Steps books are nearly all 3 moves or less,† all the way through† Step 4 (up to 1850 ELO/1950 USCF). This means that the ideas are presented in very pure form, which makes the books excellent for drilling the essence of new ideas; on the other hand, it also means that the positions are almost all composed, and that they do not require much calculation. In this respect the Steps feel a lot like CTS (chess.emrald.net) in that once you see the idea there is not that much reward for subjecting it to the suspicion appropriate to a real game. (Just in this one respect. Overall, the Steps are as far above CTS as a well-written book of progressing algebra exercises is above a bunch of random worksheets from the internet).

I have done scattered chapters of Yusupov (exactly as prescribed in the prefaces), but not systematically enough to contribute to the preceding discussion. But it became obvious that Yusupov's books are almost entirely taken from real games and feel like it. If there are composed positions, they are taken from problems or studies, which are even more "resistant" than real games. You never can get away from calculation--you do not know if there is a refutation of your idea, even in the tactical chapters.†

I think Yusupov and van Wijgerden complement each other quite well, not only done one in preparation for the other, but simultaneously.
« Last Edit: 02/06/17 at 17:34:14 by ReneDescartes »  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
ReneDescartes
God Member
*****
Offline


Qu'est-ce donc que je
suis? Une chose qui pense.

Posts: 856
Joined: 05/18/10
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #20 - 02/06/17 at 14:10:56
Post Tools
For easier books on calculation (but still plenty tough for 1500), Heisman's Is Your Move Safe? and Khmelnitsky's excellent books, particularly the somewhat easier second and third ones, all contain problems where you're not sure if there is a combination or not. In general, defensive problems require calculation, because it is not enough to spot one threat--you have to convince yourself there are not others. Good sources of defensive problems (I feel like I'm recommending spinach) are the previously-mentioned Looking for Trouble, ChessOK's Simple Defense (pieces en prise) and Advanced Defense (preventing mates) programs, and Coakley's FIDE-1500-level "Chess Exercises for Kids." Somewhat more challenging ones are in dedicated chapters of Shumilin's Chess Tactics Training and Nikitin's Improve Your Chess Tactics.

Actually, reading master games as solitaire chess for one side, writing down what you see at length, and comparing it to the notes is a great way, maybe the best way, to practice calculation (Russians, Silman, Purdy, much later Stoyko). I made a file card with a notch in it for doing this, following a suggestion of Purdy--you cover up the part of the current line you haven't read and all the following lines with the card. Of course, to do this you have to have a high tolerance for being wrong, but--it is a powerful training tool.
« Last Edit: 02/06/17 at 17:36:12 by ReneDescartes »  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Stigma
God Member
*****
Offline


There is a crack in everything.

Posts: 2624
Joined: 11/07/06
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #19 - 02/06/17 at 02:06:15
Post Tools
To be honest, I haven't really looked at the Steps beyond steps 1, 2, 3 and parts of 4. I used them in a kids' chess club for a few years, but then quit that job to free up time for other things.

I see the point of starting at the beginning. I imagine some people would feel a bit foolish spending time on exercises that seem ridiculously easy to them, with the occasional hidden treasure in-between. Though that's what Aagaard keeps saying about the Yusupov series as well: Start at the beginning (and move quickly through everything that's really easy), since you never know where the holes in your chess education are.
« Last Edit: 02/06/17 at 12:46:04 by Stigma »  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Gerry1970
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 480
Joined: 02/01/06
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #18 - 02/06/17 at 01:40:41
Post Tools
Agree with Stigma about the chess steps. Close to agreement with Proustiskeen. My rating is a fair bit about Yusupov's first series and I started with Step 2 of the Step method. Cannot hurt.

RoleyPoley wrote on 02/05/17 at 20:51:14:
[quote author=193C3D32273B323D11530 link=1485522145/13#13 date=1486305219]

what would you recommend for 1500s instead?

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
proustiskeen
God Member
*****
Offline


Hello from Omaha!

Posts: 568
Joined: 08/11/08
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #17 - 02/06/17 at 01:15:31
Post Tools
I honestly think that anyone doing the Steps should start with Step 1. Yes, it's very simple, but that's the point. You rebuild board sight from the ground up. A 1500 player hangs stuff, and that's something you learn to mostly mitigate in Steps 1 and 2.
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Straggler
Full Member
***
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 238
Location: London
Joined: 08/09/09
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #16 - 02/05/17 at 22:58:19
Post Tools
Stigma wrote on 02/05/17 at 21:27:49:
I don't know if anyone has actually tested this, but the Steps Method looks perfect for plugging some holes before moving on to the Yusupov series. From 1500, go through steps 4 and 5 (maybe even step 3).

I am already doing this. But you don't mention Step 6, which is intended for independent study rather than class use and (therefore?) comes with a lot more exercises than the others. I wonder whether Step 5 would be sufficient preparation for Yusupov? I don't know because I'm still on Step 4.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Stigma
God Member
*****
Offline


There is a crack in everything.

Posts: 2624
Joined: 11/07/06
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #15 - 02/05/17 at 21:27:49
Post Tools
I don't know if anyone has actually tested this, but the Steps Method looks perfect for plugging some holes before moving on to the Yusupov series. From 1500, go through steps 4 and 5 (maybe even step 3).

There's also Silman's books, the endgame book starting at well below 1000 and the strategy book Reassess Your Chess meant for 1400+.

On calculation I'm never sure what to suggest - most of the books on it seem to be written for Experts and above. Maybe Heisman's Looking for Trouble or Beim's book.
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
RoleyPoley
YaBB Moderator
*****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 439
Location: London
Joined: 12/29/13
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #14 - 02/05/17 at 20:51:14
Post Tools
JonathanB wrote on 02/05/17 at 14:33:39:
Gerry1970 wrote on 02/01/17 at 23:21:40:
Jonathan, it took me many months to do a book. So your time is pretty amazing. But I don't have this energy I think to replicate what you have done.

Only possible negative? I am wondering is if you are allowing enough time for the material to sink in.


My rating is 1800+ elo and circa 1950 equivalent when you convert my ECF grade so Iím quite above the supposed target audience for the first books. That said, the elo range given is absurd. The books are much to hard for 1500s.




what would you recommend for 1500s instead?
  

"As Mikhail Tal would say ' Let's have a bit of hooliganism! '"

Victor Bologan.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
JonathanB
Senior Member
****
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 430
Location: London
Joined: 11/17/07
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #13 - 02/05/17 at 14:33:39
Post Tools
chk wrote on 02/02/17 at 09:32:21:
I am going through this series without using a board (due to practical constraints) and from my experience:

- the tactics & endgame chapters could be properly done within a couple of hours each.
- the positional, strategy and opening chapters may take some more time, as in some cases you really need to play the games with a board in order to make the most of it.



Iíve heard this sort of thing before and itís pretty much my experience. I finished the Basic Pawn Endings chapter in 20 minutes in total. The chapter on Centralising Pieces, on the other hand, is pretty much taking me 20 mins for every test question.


Gerry1970 wrote on 02/01/17 at 23:21:40:
Jonathan, it took me many months to do a book. So your time is pretty amazing. But I don't have this energy I think to replicate what you have done.

Only possible negative? I am wondering is if you are allowing enough time for the material to sink in.



My rating is 1800+ elo and circa 1950 equivalent when you convert my ECF grade so Iím quite above the supposed target audience for the first books. That said, the elo range given is absurd. The books are much too hard for 1500s.

Anwyay, Iíve picked up a fair amount of knowledge along the way - e.g. endgame theory and I recognised certain test positions (Morphy at the Opera crops us - and thereís a position fro the first Alekhine - Capablanca game for instance). What I lack, I think, is the skill to apply this knowledge.

I donít think Im rushing too much yet but Iíll certainly have to slow down later. What i do need is to work out how best to work with the books. I think Iím too fond of the tactics chapters. Its easy to feel youíre making progress by completing those.


« Last Edit: 02/06/17 at 13:02:58 by JonathanB »  

www.streathambrixtonchess.blogspot.com† "I don't call you f**k face" - GM Nigel Short.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
chk
God Member
*****
Offline


a pawn is a pawn

Posts: 1063
Location: Athens
Joined: 10/26/06
Gender: Male
Re: Yusupovís 9 Book Series
Reply #12 - 02/02/17 at 09:32:21
Post Tools
I am going through this series without using a board (due to practical constraints) and from my experience:

- the tactics & endgame chapters could be properly done within a couple of hours each.
- the positional, strategy and opening chapters may take some more time, as in some cases you really need to play the games with a board in order to make the most of it.

But I agree with Gerry that Yusupov's writing is condensed and to the point, so sometimes you need to think a bit for the material to sink in (like those old, wise Chinese books in a way).

Myself, halfway through book 2, taking many, many breaks lately. I think it took me about a month to finish the 1st, but was accustomed to the material covered (likewise with the 2nd).
  

"I play honestly and I play to win. If I lose, I take my medicine." - Bobby
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 
Topic Tools
Bookmarks: del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Google+ Linked in reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Yahoo