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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis (Read 17784 times)
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #95 - 02/09/18 at 19:19:00
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Playing the lines today i found that after 1.d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Nf3 Nbd7 6. e3 h6 7. Bh4 0-0 the move 8. Be2 is not covered. After 8. Bd3, 8. Qc2 and 8.Rc1 there always comes 8...c5!; so it should be okay against 8. Be2 as well. The highest rated game, Ding - So, Saint Louis 2016, went 8... dxc4. But that transposes to the line 8. Bd3 dxc4 which is analyzed but not recommended. The two next highest rated players played 8... c5, which should be our repertoire move. In my blitz game i played it without much thought.





  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #94 - 01/25/18 at 07:09:19
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I also got my copy some months ago and have "playing the french" in my bookshelf. Both books together look like a great cornerstone to build up a serious repertoire against 1. d4, 1. e4, 1. c4 and 1. Nf3. The introduction texts are also a very good feature. The quality of the texts is comperable to Matthew Sadlers outdated book on the same topic.

I like the system against the catalan much better than the stuff in John Cox book based on the Kramnik - Topalov stuff from the 2006 WCC.

I also like the system against the london. Some time ago i learned the system from John Cox "dealing with d4 deviations". That system with early Bf5 is good, but you get some move order issues or have to learn slav setups too. In my test games with the "new" stuff  i get good positions with that simple system (d5, Nf6, e6, Bd6, c5, 0-0, b6 followed by Ba6).

I'm not sure if any other queen's gambit book author gave attention to systems like 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e3. That is also included.

In "Playing 1. d4 d5" there are some pages for the coverage of the blackmar-diemer-gambit. For starters i will play 1. d4 d5 2. e4 e6. Maybe i will come back to more ambitious lines against that move order later. To add one more sideline i don't find: I also don't find anything against the diemer-duhm-gambit (1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. e4) in both books.  Cheesy
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #93 - 01/08/18 at 23:58:46
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I have to say that the e-book version is a bit messy and hard to navigate. That is more critique against the Forward chess-app than the book in itself. Anyway, what I mean by saying this is that I am not sure if a line is covered in it or not.

In particular, I am looking for a line in the Exchange variation where White does not play 7. Bd3. The only thing I find on this is a short note saying that "7. Qc2 Nbd7 hardly changes anything, as White will surely put his bishop on d3 at some point.". However, what about the games Kasimdzhanov-Hertneck, 2001, or the games played by Van Wely against Filippov in 2004? The idea is that White can e.g. Ne5 and drop the knight back to d3 in case of ...g6 and ...Bf5. In these 3 games, Black played 11...g6, but got into some trouble.

Is the game Anand-Kramnik, Zurich 2015 something to follow in this case perhaps?
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #92 - 12/30/17 at 16:37:18
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Wow Flig, that was brutal.  I can't imagine that 5.g4?! is particularly good, but it is the sort of move that I think should be covered (even if in half a page) in a repertoire book.  I can't imagine that it's worse than the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit for instance, and it was recommended in a book for the White side (if recommended is the right word).  It's the sort of thing that you might encounter in a club match if your opponent wants to spring a sharp surprise weapon on you.

Still no book can cover absolutely everything, and Ntirlis did an admirable job of packing a ton of information into ~325 pages. 

Speaking of the Blackmar-Diemer, I've never played the Euwe Defense before as I've always thought that's basically what White wants to see when he plays the opening.  However after just casually perusing and reading Ntirlis' coverage without a board, I decided to play the Euwe Defense in an online blitz game against a FM, which I won very easily.  Perhaps I've underestimated it, and I'll take a closer look.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #91 - 12/30/17 at 09:53:18
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The line 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Be7 5.g4 is certainly worth a mention. It probably flew under the radar of the author because it has been played only rarely and the game Mamedyarov - Ponomariov (the last high-level encounter in this line) is from 2010. Maybe the big guys know that it is not very good and therefore it has not been repeated on this level.

Apart from Ponomariov´s decent choice of 5...0-0 6.g5 Ne4 Black has a bunch of good-looking options:

a) 5...c5 would be my first thought.
b) 5...h6 and
c) 5...dxc4 certainly make a lot of sense.
d) even 5...Bb4!?, transposing to a Ragozin set-up where White has been given the move g2-g4 for free, isn´t ridiculous I think.

The last time a GM tried this he was beaten by a much lower-rated player in crushing style, which is not a good advertisement for 5.g4?!:

  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #90 - 12/29/17 at 19:42:20
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Oh you're right Rene; I don't know how I missed that.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #89 - 12/29/17 at 11:52:06
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But the covered Nbd2 lines all have the bishop sealed in. It's not only the move order, but the combination of d4 with c4, Bg5 (or Bf4 for that matter) and Nbd2 that is not covered. This is hardly a criticism of Ntirlis--he can't cover every harmless nontheoretical possibility.
« Last Edit: 12/30/17 at 05:04:55 by ReneDescartes »  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #88 - 12/28/17 at 21:14:34
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I just received my copy, and while I haven't had much time with it, my initial impressions are quite positive. 

I will say that this idea of developing the b1-knight to d2 is covered in the book, in chapter 4b, beginning on page 182.  It's true that Ntirlis doesn't seem to say anything about the 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5 move order in particular, but I can't possibly see how playing 4...Be7 would lead outside of the scope of the book.  There is also some coverage via the Colle move order.

One variation that I do wish had been covered, but which I can't find, is 5.g4!?.  It looks ridiculous but has been played by some strong players (rarely):



If I recall correctly, it was also covered in Dangerous Weapons: The Queen's Gambit, so it would have been nice if Ntirlis offered a solution for Black here. 


Stigma wrote on 12/22/17 at 14:24:57:
I didn't go back and look at the older threads. But doesn't 4.Bg5 h6 make a lot of sense if Black is a Moscow/Anti-Moscow player (like that Kaufman repertoire)?


Yes, you're probably right; 4...h6 should probably be the choice of a Moscow player.  But I'm not sure what to recommend if Black wants to play the Botvinnik, and even a Moscow player might be out of their normal repertoire after 5.Bxf6 Qxf6 6.Qb3 or 6.Nbd2.  Probably nothing too critical, but if you want to play the Botvinnik from this move order as Black, White can force you out of it.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #87 - 12/22/17 at 14:24:57
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ErictheRed wrote on 12/21/17 at 19:47:41:
As an aside, I've pointed out here before that Larry Kaufman's Chess Advantage in Black and White completely overlooked this move order, so if someone wanted to play a Semi-Slav as he recommended, a move order like 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.c4 d5 4.Bg5 c6 5.e3 completely bypasses Kaufman's old repertoire. 

I didn't go back and look at the older threads. But doesn't 4.Bg5 h6 make a lot of sense if Black is a Moscow/Anti-Moscow player (like that Kaufman repertoire)? That's what happened when I tried 4.Bg5 against an up-and-coming GM from India.

Perhaps 4.Bg5 is really most annoying for Botvinnik Semi-Slav players, though they could try to make 4...dxc4 work.
« Last Edit: 12/22/17 at 16:19:00 by Stigma »  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #86 - 12/21/17 at 19:47:41
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Stigma wrote on 12/21/17 at 00:45:10:
ErictheRed wrote on 12/20/17 at 21:43:52:
I fail to see how this move order could at all be an issue in Ntirlis' repertoire, that's all.

I don't see anyone here arguing it's an issue, certainly not in a theoretical sense. But it's still nice to be aware of the possibility and have a brief line prepared, like the one from ReneDescartes / ECO.


You're right, sorry; I just didn't understand the question in the context of this particular thread.  I've only ever understood the 3.Nf3 and 4.Bg5 move order as a way to avoid a few not-so-great gambits (Dutch-Peruvian), and the Semi-Slav.  If 4...c6 5.e3 instead of 5.Nc3, there's no Semi-Slav.  I've never known it to not transpose into normal QGD lines if that's what Black wants.   

We've had some other threads about this, for instance:

http://www.chesspub.com/cgi-bin/chess/YaBB.pl?num=1150193772

http://www.chesspub.com/cgi-bin/chess/YaBB.pl?num=1245671556

As an aside, I've pointed out here before that Larry Kaufman's Chess Advantage in Black and White completely overlooked this move order, so if someone wanted to play a Semi-Slav as he recommended, a move order like 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.d4 d5 4.Bg5 c6 5.e3 completely bypasses Kaufman's old repertoire. 
« Last Edit: 12/22/17 at 15:06:47 by ErictheRed »  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #85 - 12/21/17 at 00:45:10
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ErictheRed wrote on 12/20/17 at 21:43:52:
I fail to see how this move order could at all be an issue in Ntirlis' repertoire, that's all.

I don't see anyone here arguing it's an issue, certainly not in a theoretical sense. But it's still nice to be aware of the possibility and have a brief line prepared, like the one from ReneDescartes / ECO.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #84 - 12/20/17 at 21:43:52
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Yes Stigma, that's what I meant to say (I edited my post). 

I've never thought that Nb1-d2 made much sense outside of the Semi-Slav (or Colle) move order that Palliser gave, but sure, it's playable.  Also with a bishop on e7 instead of d6, ...dxc4 becomes more viable since the knight doesn't recapture with tempo. 

I fail to see how this move order could at all be an issue in Ntirlis' repertoire, that's all.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #83 - 12/20/17 at 19:48:28
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Yes, Black going for an immediate ...c5 instead of ...c6 was one of the problems I discovered with this Nbd2 setup.

But I only played it up to a level of maybe 1700, and there most Black QGD players would rattle off lots of solid-looking moves (Be7, Nbd7, 0-0, c6 etc.) on auto-pilot. Sort of a "get some pieces out, get castled, and only then start thinking" mindset.

ErictheRed wrote on 12/20/17 at 17:37:26:
Palliser recommended this move order, but didn't he want normal Queen's Gambit lines? I don't think that he followed up by putting the knight on c3.

Palliser in Play 1.d4! went for 5.Nc3 against 4...Be7, allowing regular QGD lines. But that's what you meant to say, right?

Actually he still covered the lines I used to play – but from a Triangle move order: 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 c6 4.Bg5 Nf6 5.Nbd2!? followed by e3, Bd3, 0-0, etc. I had already stopped playing this when Palliser's book came out, and I haven't kept up with theory here at all. But I would still be tempted to play like this if I could get Black to commit to an early ...c6.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #82 - 12/20/17 at 18:00:03
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kylemeister wrote on 12/20/17 at 17:34:16:
ReneDescartes wrote on 12/20/17 at 17:08:08:
So here is my line--not Ntirlis': 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7!? (4. Bb4=) 5.e3 O-O 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 (6...b6 and 7...c5 =) 7.Rc1 c5 =.


That (with 7. Rc1 c5 leading to equality) was also a main line in ECO (2004), with the cited games unsurprisingly including one by Hebden and one by Capablanca.


Good to know. I didn't want to lay claim to it, just to absolve Ntirlis from any of my errors. I was expanding my post while you wrote this, so it doesn't read exactly the same way now.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #81 - 12/20/17 at 17:37:26
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Palliser recommended this move order, but didn't he want normal Queen's Gambit lines?  I don't think that he followed up by putting the knight on d2.

I don't think that this move order should be at all problematic if Black wants his bishop on e7.  It's only potentially annoying against Ragozin, Vienna, and Semi-Slav players, unless I'm missing something.
« Last Edit: 12/20/17 at 21:40:43 by ErictheRed »  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #80 - 12/20/17 at 17:34:16
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ReneDescartes wrote on 12/20/17 at 17:08:08:
So here is my line--not Ntirlis': 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7!? (4. Bb4=) 5.e3 O-O 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 (6...b6 and 7...c5 =) 7.Rc1 c5 =.


That (with 7. Rc1 c5 leading to equality) was also a main line in ECO (2004), with the cited games unsurprisingly including one by Hebden and one by Capablanca.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #79 - 12/20/17 at 17:08:08
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Palliser recommend this in his Play 1.d4!, but only as an equal, anti-theoretical response to attempts to reach a normal Vienna or Ragozin. It's interesting that you played it against ...Be7.

This line is not covered in Ntirlis' book, although his move order against the Torre attack 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bg5 allows White to transpose into it with 4.c4. But he doesn't mention this possibility.

To me it seems that, since White voluntarily gives up pressure on d5, one might well ask, "What is Bg5 then for?"  In many lines of the Queen's Gambit, the ...c5 break is not good because of the pressure on d5: the break leaves d5 either hanging or prone to become isolated without good piece play. But here Black can just go ahead with ...c5 after a little preparation with ...O-O and either b6 or ...Nbd7 and be immediately equal--not even forced to go for an isolated pawn or hanging pawns if he doesn't want them (though these too are probably fine here).

So here is a small Ntirlis-friendly repertoire I constructed after a little research: 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7!? (4. Bb4! is probably even better if you know the main lines of the Ragozin--White has already lost the chance to enter its popular sidelines with Qb3 or Qa5.) 5.e3 O-O 6.Nbd2 (if White instead plays Nc3 at any reasonable point he will transpose into Ntirlis) 6...Nbd7 ( 6...b6 and 7...c5 = may be even better, resembling a Tartakower rather than Ntirlis' Classical QGD) 7.Rc1 c5 = (7...h6 8.Bh4 c5= might be even better if you don't mind dealing with the harmless 8.Bf4 and Bxf6).
« Last Edit: 12/20/17 at 19:02:53 by ReneDescartes »  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #78 - 12/20/17 at 16:34:39
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Again I don't have Ntirlis' book yet, but I have to say that I find this question regarding 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5 extremely surprising.  This isn't some crazy, tricky move order, unless Black happens to be a Semi-Slav player and would rather not face 4...c6 5.e3, with a Cambridge Springs.  It's fairly common for White.

Surely Ntirlis gave some small amount of guidance regarding move order here?  And what is Black worried about after either 4...Be7 or 4...Nbd7?  The only reasonalbe way that White can avoid a transposition back into repertoire lines (I think) would be to play 5.e3 and 6.Nbd2.  Sure it's playable (some strong GMs have played it), but surely not a huge deal?

It sounds as though, perhaps, Ntirlis overlooked these Nb1-d2 systems, which is perhaps slightly regrettable (a page or less might have sufficed to just give some guidance to the reader) but completely understandable.  I can't remember another book ever covering them.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #77 - 12/20/17 at 16:26:25
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Stigma wrote on 12/20/17 at 11:33:46:
In one of my earliest attempts at creating an opening repertoire as a junior, I did exactly this. I was always happy to see Black set up a typical Semi-Slav or QGD with ...c6 and ...Nbd7, when I would invariably put my knight on d2. This was based on studying the games of Mark Hebden, who used to play like this.


A player I recall as having a penchant for Nbd2 is Capablanca.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #76 - 12/20/17 at 16:20:38
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doefmat wrote on 12/19/17 at 18:23:31:
Anyone know what the best move order is in the following line for this repertoire?

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5

Should I play Be7 or Nbd7 here for reaching our repertoire lines?
This sort of question comes up in every repertoire. Our opponent plays a different move order, and we must choose whether to try to transpose back to our usual line, or adopt a completely different line. My preference is to carefully prepare a different line. Our opponent may be happy that they have "move-ordered" us, but the careful preparation part means that theoretically we are doing even better than in our usual line.


ReneDescartes wrote on 12/19/17 at 20:13:40:
If you intend to transpose, I don't think it matters, because you will soon play both moves ...

Otherwise, either move will transpose almost all the time. White, without good reason, will probably not put his knight on d2 instead of c3. That would be out of book for you, but weaker than Nc3.
I agree with ReneDescartes. (I also agree with the parts he wrote that I did not quote.) But if white plays Nbd2, I think the Lasker Defense is more effective than usual. So my vote is for 4...Be7.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #75 - 12/20/17 at 11:33:46
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ReneDescartes wrote on 12/19/17 at 20:13:40:
White, without good reason, will probably not put his knight on d2 instead of c3. That would be out of book for you, but weaker than Nc3.

In one of my earliest attempts at creating an opening repertoire as a junior, I did exactly this. I was always happy to see Black set up a typical Semi-Slav or QGD with ...c6 and ...Nbd7, when I would invariably put my knight on d2. This was based on studying the games of Mark Hebden, who used to play like this.

Of course White shouldn't get an edge with Nbd2, but it's not entirely toothless either. In particular, taking on c4 (a typical freeing move for Black) is often bad, since White will recapture with the knight and have full control of the e5 square.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #74 - 12/20/17 at 08:28:50
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doefmat wrote on 12/19/17 at 18:23:31:
Anyone know what the best move order is in the following line for this repertoire?

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5

Should I play Be7 or Nbd7 here for reaching our repertoire lines?


The most logical move (at least for me) is to play 4...Bb4+ (as a Ragozin player myself maybe it's more natural to me than for a strict QGD player). If White plays 5.Nc3 to cover the check (the best move) you are in a pure Ragozin. If not, 5.Bd2 is answered by 5...Be7 and you are back in your territory (White will spend another tempo moving his bishop from d2 sooner or later), and 5.Nbd2 can be met by 5...dxc4.

I think in that move order, Nbd7 is more natural to me if you don't want to play the Ragozin. You are safe in case of Bxf6 and there is no way to punish this (no e4, no Nxd5...). But, as Rene and Eric pointed before, usually it will transpose to the same. You play Be7 next move (if White don't get crazy) and the game moves on to known QGD waters.

Salut,
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #73 - 12/19/17 at 20:13:40
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If you intend to transpose, I don't think it matters, because you will soon play both moves: exchanging on f6 is a bad idea for White and I bet you'll never see it. But if he does it, you might want to have played 4...Nd7 first to get a more familiar position.

If White plays the line you gave, you could also play 4...h6 immediately and then if 5.Bh4, the bishop can't help on d2 anymore, so 5...Bb4+ gains bite.

Otherwise, either move will transpose almost all the time. White, without good reason, will probably not put his knight on d2 instead of c3. That would be out of book for you, but weaker than Nc3.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #72 - 12/19/17 at 20:07:02
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doefmat wrote on 12/19/17 at 18:23:31:
Anyone know what the best move order is in the following line for this repertoire?

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5

Should I play Be7 or Nbd7 here for reaching our repertoire lines?


Is that move order not covered in the book...? 

I finally ordered a copy myself, I was waiting for some Amazon gift card money before buying it, but it hasn't arrived yet.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #71 - 12/19/17 at 18:23:31
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Anyone know what the best move order is in the following line for this repertoire?

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5

Should I play Be7 or Nbd7 here for reaching our repertoire lines?
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #70 - 11/30/17 at 15:03:34
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I have this and also the one about the French. It's a mix of sensations. I am reading a book which teaches the principles of the opening at a very basic level but at the same time feeling that the ideas, and plans are proved and used at maximum level, I am confident that my options following their recommendations are the better ones in the positions.

Very good way of presenting the openings. Thx, Nikos.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #69 - 11/30/17 at 10:18:05
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So far this book is really great! I like the introduction chapters very much and now understand the plans in this opening much better. I hope this guy is going to write more books. A 1.e4 repertoire book based on the Ruy Lopez with an early d3 would be nice. Tongue
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #68 - 11/26/17 at 22:26:33
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A good idea with a separate thread for this 4...dxc4 discussion, mn. Perhaps a helpful moderator will move the relevant posts over there?

mn wrote on 11/26/17 at 22:01:48:

  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #67 - 11/26/17 at 22:08:52
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mn wrote on 11/26/17 at 21:34:00:
Probably 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3 0-0 5 Bd3 d5 6 Nf3 c5 7 0-0 dxc4 8 Bxc4 cxd4 9 exd4 Nc6 10 Bg5 Be7


And he gives only one sentence to this on page 331, if I haven't missed something.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #66 - 11/26/17 at 22:01:48
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #65 - 11/26/17 at 21:34:00
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Probably 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3 0-0 5 Bd3 d5 6 Nf3 c5 7 0-0 dxc4 8 Bxc4 cxd4 9 exd4 Nc6 10 Bg5 Be7
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #64 - 11/26/17 at 21:32:58
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Stigma wrote on 11/26/17 at 21:25:49:
What is Sokolov's Nimzo-Indian move order to reach this line?


4. e3 0-0 5. Bd3 d5 6. Nf3 c5 7. 0-0 dc 8. Bxc4 cd 9. ed Nc6 10. Bg5 Be7.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #63 - 11/26/17 at 21:25:49
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What is Sokolov's Nimzo-Indian move order to reach this line?

On first glance it is a bit surprising if this is nothing at all for White, since he gets all his pieces out in one move without being forced to put any of them on obviously suboptimal squares.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #62 - 11/26/17 at 21:02:04
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Re the IQP, Ivan Sokolov in his 4. e3 Nimzo book thought that the position after  1.  d4 d5 2.  c4 e6 3.  Nc3 Nf6 4.  Bg5 dxc4 5.  e3 c5 6.  Bxc4 cxd4 7.  exd4 Be7 8.  Nf3 O-O 9.  O-O Nc6 "does not promise White anything special."  His main line involved 10. a3 a6 (I'm aware of old stuff considering the approach with ...b6 as leading to +=), and ended up with "a double-edged position." 

Ostensibly it's a case of White being slightly disadvantaged by having Bg5 in (not being able to hold the bishop back, as he can in e.g. the Nimzo move-order Sokolov was considering).
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #61 - 11/26/17 at 20:46:38
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Regarding the IQP line, I was thinking in terms of the Nimzo-Indian; it's essentially a Karpov Variation where instead of ...b6 Black has gone for ...Nc6 and ...Be7. This is solid enough, mind you, but seemed to me a little less challenging than the ususal stuff Black would play in that line.

Dreev is an excellent endorsement of course, but I was thinking more in terms of something I'd (or the prospective Vienna player, for that matter) be personally happy to play, rather than objective quality. It is stylistically rather far removed from the Vienna IMO.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #60 - 11/26/17 at 20:32:56
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Stigma wrote on 11/26/17 at 13:19:48:
The context is I already play the Nimzo-Indian now and then, but I don't have anything good against 3.Nf3. The Vienna, the Ragozin or 4...a6 could fill that hole...


If you enjoy the Black side of the Exchange QGD and decide to play the Vienna, then 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxc4!?  seems logical.  If you choose to play the Ragozin, then I'd strongly consider 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4!? in that position.

Anyway, we're getting pretty far from discussing Ntirlis' book, so maybe this should be moved to another thread.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #59 - 11/26/17 at 20:17:47
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mn wrote on 11/26/17 at 19:45:46:
I'd considered this 4...dxc4 line at one point, but I was a bit put off by the fact that 5 e3 c5 6 Bxc4 etc. seems to be a pleasant version of an IQP for White (relative to what he normally gets).


Does it?  I'm no expert in this line, but


Seems to lead to the same position as this line of the Caro-Kann:


On the bright side you avoid the dangerous 7.d5 line of the Caro-Kann, but the downside is that you can't play the  7.Bxc4 h6 line, either.  But Dreev has seemed happy to play this way for Black quite a bit, even against the world elites.

It seems like 4...dxc4!? is a viable idea, and one that I've been interested in lately.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #58 - 11/26/17 at 19:45:46
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I'd considered this 4...dxc4 line at one point, but I was a bit put off by the fact that 5 e3 c5 6 Bxc4 etc. seems to be a pleasant version of an IQP for White (relative to what he normally gets).
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #57 - 11/26/17 at 17:09:43
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TonyRo wrote on 11/26/17 at 16:42:46:
I have been playing 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxc4 for a long time and quite like it. I can't count how many games I've won with 5.e4 c5 6.e5? cxd4! 7.exf6 gxf6! etc, for instance 8.Bh4 Nc6!? 9.Ne4 Bb4+-+. But if you're planning on playing 4...a6!? there's a nice bonus as well that 4...dxc4 5.Nf3 a6! transposes to a promising line there too.

That's encouraging! I thought 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxc4 5.Nf3 would be heading for the Vienna, but if Black can (or even should) avoid that, it keeps the choice of main line against 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 wide open.

Edit: 4.Bg5 dxc4 5.e4 c5 6.Nf3 is still a Vienna though, isn't it?
Edit 2: OK, maybe Black can do better than transposing with 6...cxd4 7.Nxd4 Bb4 here, for instance 7...Bc5 or 7...Qb6.

An aside: I was completely unaware of 4...a6 until the new Junior world champion beat me with it in blitz a couple of years ago. That guy got good fast...
« Last Edit: 11/26/17 at 19:35:03 by Stigma »  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #56 - 11/26/17 at 16:42:46
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I have been playing 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxc4 for a long time and quite like it. I can't count how many games I've won with 5.e4 c5 6.e5? cxd4! 7.exf6 gxf6! etc, for instance 8.Bh4 Nc6!? 9.Ne4 Bb4+-+. But if you're planning on playing 4...a6!? there's a nice bonus as well that 4...dxc4 5.Nf3 a6! transposes to a promising line there too.

A side note - I can't find anything wrong with 4...a6!? but I hate that the main line and the most principled idea is 5.cxd5...
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #55 - 11/26/17 at 13:19:48
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Thanks everybody for your comments.

I will look into both the Dutch-Peruvian gambit and ErictheRed's 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxc4 5.e3 c5, which I wasn't aware of.

I can understand it looks strange that I don't want to follow Kramnik  Smiley
The context is I already play the Nimzo-Indian now and then, but I don't have anything good against 3.Nf3. The Vienna, the Ragozin or 4...a6 could fill that hole. And if I can solve this 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 problem, they could even enable me to mix it up and switch between allowing the Nimzo and the Exchange QGD (I already have some interest in the ...Nh5 lines I believe Ntirlis recommends after I've read about them in Lars Bo Hansen's books and banged my head against them with White).

I dislike the idea of adopting an entire repertoire book – where's the creativity and individuality in that? Still, I just might end up dropping the Vienna/Ragozin and just following Ntirlis all the way. Anyone who does so should be aware of this useful option of switching between allowing the Nimzo and the Exchange QGD, to make preparation a bit harder for opponents.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #54 - 11/26/17 at 09:30:02
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I'm reminded of a CBM article from circa 10 months ago to the effect that after 1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Bg5 Ne4 "Black still has some problems to solve."
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #53 - 11/26/17 at 06:19:26
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@Stigma, possibly I am misunderstanding ...... but trying to understand as I have also been interested in trying to develop a repertoire based on Ragozin and Vienna.

Ntirlis recommends in Ch 1,
1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 Bg5 Be7 5 e3 Nbd7
but I suppose you think 1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Nf6 4 Bg5 Be7 5 Nf3 transposes into QGD. If so, then Ntirlis does not suggest any alternatives.
But he suggests Kramnik's variation with 5...Nbd7. I think he is basing his repertoire on this move, ...Nbd7. Perhaps Kramnik's positional play is not to your liking??

Re 1 d4 d5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 Bg5, he suggests 3...Nbd7 (!) but he did mention 3...Ne4 (!?) and recommends Avrukh in GM 11, says B gets good chances but requires theory and prefers 3...Nbd7 as it solid and transposes into the repertoire.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #52 - 11/26/17 at 05:43:49
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If you want something daring try 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 c5 5.cxd5 cxd4, the Dutch-Peruvian Gambit.  It’s not considered all that good, but I know an FM who plays it from time-to-time and does pretty well, especially against lower-rated players.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #51 - 11/25/17 at 17:48:55
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You could consider 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 dxc4, which has been played by some strong players and has obvious similarities with the Vienna.  After 5.e3, 5...c5 is the most straightforward attempt to equalize. 
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #50 - 11/25/17 at 03:29:37
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3 Nc3 Nf6 4 Bg5 is a problem for such a repertoire, yeah. Through that move order you could always try something like the cambridge springs, though
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #49 - 11/25/17 at 02:19:48
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Thanks for the detailed reply, emary!

emary wrote on 11/25/17 at 01:53:08:
Ragozin via 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 ?

Pert: Playing the Ragozin
gives a complete repertoire against 1.d4 2.(3.)c4 based on the Ragozin and avoiding the Nimzo-Indian.
A crucial Line is 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4! 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bf4 Ne7! 6.Bd3 Bf5 which is analyzed in the book.
[...]

Maybe I didn't explain this well. Let me try again: I like Ntirlis' lines against the Exchange variation (I think), but I don't want to play the QGD main lines with 4.Nf3 Be7; I believe (rightly or wrongly) they are a bit too tame for my taste. So I want to combine 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.cxd5 exd5 a la Ntirlis with something else, like the Ragozin 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Bb4 (or the Vienna 4...dxc4, or 4...a6, which I don't know a name for).

But it seems like the relatively rare 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 is a problem for this kind of combination. I was wondering if anyone has a solution to that.

So it seems like a lot of Ntirlis' d-pawn specials stuff is useful even with a "Nimzo-Indian" 1...Nf6/2...e6 move order (probably the most common way to use the Ragozin or the Vienna in a repertoire). Interesting that he doesn't recommend 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bg5 Ne4, which has been considered the big problem with this move order for White. Maybe what he gives for Black is just as good.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #48 - 11/25/17 at 01:53:08
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Hello Stigma!

Ragozin via 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 ?

Pert: Playing the Ragozin
gives a complete repertoire against 1.d4 2.(3.)c4 based on the Ragozin and avoiding the Nimzo-Indian.
A crucial Line is 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4! 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bf4 Ne7! 6.Bd3 Bf5 which is analyzed in the book.

After 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Bb4 5.cxd5 exd5 Pert thinks a setup with Bd3 and Ne2 is problematic for Black, but he doesn't give concrete lines. According to Pert Qb3 ideas might also be annoying if you want to use this move-order.
If you play a 1...Nf6 move-order you have the same problem obviously.
1.d4 e6 makes little sense if you have to follow up with 2.c4 d5 to avoid this problem.


Ntirlis: Playing 1.d4 d5
Are his recommendations against the Queens-Pawn openings compatible with the  1...Nf6 2...e6 move-order?   

Fianchetto:
1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.g3 e6 4.Bg2 b5

Colle-Koltanowsky:
1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e3 e6 4.Bd3 c5 5.c3 Be7 6.Nd2 0-0
Colle-Zukertort:
... 5.b3 Be7 6.Bb2 0-0 7.0-0 b6
(e3 Queens-Gambit
... 4.c4 Be7) 

London System: 
1.d4 d5 2.Bf4 Nf6 3.e3 e6 4.Nf3 Bd6 (4.Nd2 Bd6)

These lines seem very compatible with the 1...Nf6 2...e6 move-order.

Ntirlis recommendations against the Torre have to be adapted if you want to use the 1...Nf6 2...e6 move-order:

A.
1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Bg5 Nd7! 4.Nd2 h6! 5.Bh4 e6 6.e4
(6.e3 -> 3.c3 move-order)
(...4.Nc3 -> Veresov ...4.e3 -> 3.c3-move-order)

B.
... 3.c3 e6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.Nd2 Nd7! 6.e3 c5 7.Bd3 h6 8.Bh4 b6!

Ntirlis doesn't cover the Tromp, his move-order is always 1...d5.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #47 - 11/24/17 at 15:18:35
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A quick question for those who have the book: Do the lines against d-pawn specials like the London, Torre and Colle require a 1...d5 move order, or do they work with 1...Nf6/2...e6 or 1...e6 as well?

I'm not that interested in the QGD main lines right now, but am thinking of getting this anyway for the Catalan and "specials" coverage.

Another thing I've wondered: Can you play the Ragozin QGD (or the Vienna or the recently semi-fashionable 4...a6!? for that matter) but go with Ntirlis for the rest of the repertoire (especially the QGD Exchange lines), or will that run into move order problems? I'm thinking of 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5, for instance.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #46 - 11/24/17 at 14:33:29
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Traditionally an N suffix on a move means "novelty": a move that has not been played before in published competitive games, so a new suggestion of the author.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #45 - 11/24/17 at 13:05:58
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I have the book. Looks fantastic. There are quite a few moves that have a big letter ‘N’ at the end of a move. Are these typo’s? Can’t figure out the meaning of it.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #44 - 11/22/17 at 08:25:27
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doefmat wrote on 11/21/17 at 14:34:17:
Looks like an interesting book. As a 1500 club player I try to have a classical repertoire as possible. I switched to the Slav because many players said white has all the easy plans in the QGD exchange and it's very hard for black.

Would this repertoire be more ' easy' to understand than ' Play the Slav'  for example?



Here there are covered the anti-lines. "Play the Slav" don't cover Tromp, Torre, London and close friends. And at that level, I imagine you face as Black very few 1.d4 2.c4 guys.

Exchange variation of the QGD (I use a lot as White) is the line you are going to face the more if you play 1...d5 and 2...e6. And the explanations in the book to play confidently as Black are superb. Easy to follow and good theoretically. The positions are complex (not sterile equality) but Black is OK there.

In some way, I like the positional, solid, classical way of play as Black that QGD tends to give to me. Slav positions are sometimes more irrational, more complex, more imbalanced (good to play for a win). But I would like to know how good are the options to win as Black in the Exchange variation of the Slav, for example.

Salut.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #43 - 11/21/17 at 20:05:14
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doefmat wrote on 11/21/17 at 14:34:17:
a 1500 club player I try to have a classical repertoire as possible. I switched to the Slav because many players said white has all the easy plans in the QGD exchange and it's very hard for black.

Would this repertoire be more ' easy' to understand than ' Play the Slav'  for example?


I personally think the plans are somewhat easier to understand in the Slav than the QGD, but at a club player level there are other things that are more important than an "objective" comparison, because there will be deviations from theory pretty early on in every game.

Also, depending on what system you play against d-pawn specials, one or the other opening might suit you better.

With that said, the book is very good and worth buying anyhow Smiley
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #42 - 11/21/17 at 14:34:17
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Looks like an interesting book. As a 1500 club player I try to have a classical repertoire as possible. I switched to the Slav because many players said white has all the easy plans in the QGD exchange and it's very hard for black.

Would this repertoire be more ' easy' to understand than ' Play the Slav'  for example?
« Last Edit: 11/21/17 at 16:49:31 by doefmat »  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #41 - 10/15/17 at 21:28:58
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I'm reminded of such people as Max Illingworth (in an update from a year ago) and (I believe) LeeRoth who have expressed the heretical(?) view that 3...Be7 and 3...Nf6 are equally good.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #40 - 10/15/17 at 20:48:37
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It’s interesting that 3...Nf6 has taken over. 3...Be7 used to be considered better because it avoids the exchange variation with Bg5. I think this started during the first Kasparov-Karpov match...?

What I’m curious about is why did 3...Nf6 take over? Is it because of the line that’s recommended in this book or is it because of 3...Nxd5, transposing into the Semi-Tarrasch?
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #39 - 10/14/17 at 08:54:41
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Thank you for pointing this out.

The chapters about the Exchange are indeed big, but to me they form the heart of the book.

I don´t mind playing 3...Nf6. I was just wondering what the pros and cons are regarding the repertoire presented in your book. But this is of course not essential for your work.

After studying your book I´m looking forward playing the QGD in my next tournament games.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #38 - 10/13/17 at 21:33:45
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Actually, i wanted to talk about 3...Be7 in the intro to the "Exchange Variation" chapter, but for those who have the book, this chapter became very big, so i thought to cut the relevant section.

I don't think that it is easy for Black to equalise after 3...Be7 to be honest (this is one of the reasons that in the highest level they play ...Nf6 much more often). Also, the ...Nf6 move order is much more flexible.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #37 - 10/13/17 at 13:54:22
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Fllg wrote on 10/12/17 at 16:03:25:
I have to admit that I don´t know much about the QGD from either side and so I very much appreciate the lucid explanations in the book.

One thing I haven´t found explained is regarding the pros and cons of the moveorder 3...Nf6 vs. 3...Be7. Looking at the suggested Repertoire the only downside of 3...Be7 seems to occur after 4.cxd5 exd6 5.Bf4 when 5...c6 6.e3 Bf5 allows 7.g4 or 7.Nge2.

On the other hand 3...Be7 seems to avoid some stuff in he Exchange Variation like the lines with 0-0-0 , doesn´t it?

Perhaps someone can enlighten me here if there are other disadvantages of playing 3...Be7 ?


Black is fine after 3. ... Nf6 as well as after 3. ... Be7. The author does a good job explaining how to play the resulting positions. I suppose he could have done the same with 3. ... Be7, but then again, this is a repertoire book and not a comprehensive survey. I can also imagine that the team at QC liked the idea of tackling the cornerstone of many white repertoire books of this decade, which is the classical exchange variation with 3. ... Nf6. It seems to fit in better with the idea of a classical repertoire. Objectively there is nothing wrong with any of both variations.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #36 - 10/12/17 at 16:03:25
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I have to admit that I don´t know much about the QGD from either side and so I very much appreciate the lucid explanations in the book.

One thing I haven´t found explained is regarding the pros and cons of the moveorder 3...Nf6 vs. 3...Be7. Looking at the suggested Repertoire the only downside of 3...Be7 seems to occur after 4.cxd5 exd6 5.Bf4 when 5...c6 6.e3 Bf5 allows 7.g4 or 7.Nge2.

On the other hand 3...Be7 seems to avoid some stuff in he Exchange Variation like the lines with 0-0-0 , doesn´t it?

Perhaps someone can enlighten me here if there are other disadvantages of playing 3...Be7 ?
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #35 - 10/12/17 at 11:29:27
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Hello guys. The same "omission" was pointed out at the QC blog together with the line 1.c4 e6 2.e4?! (or maybe just "!?").

In both cases, it is not the case that i "forgot" to mention these lines in the book. I simply chose not to cover them. As far as these sidelines are concerned, there are two wonderful books by Quality Chess, one is Avrukh's and the other one comes from Mikhalevski. I could never match their analysis quality and thoroughness. So, i chose (together with the editors from QC) to offer a "starter's repertoire" in the English and other sidelines and refer to those two books for anyone interested in more. Oterwise the size of the book would have been much bigger and it would lose its purpose (which was not an encyclopedic manual but rather a practical guide).

In any case, this is what i answered in the QC blog, trying to stay in the spirit of the book, being as practical as possible:

"I dont think that the Stonewall Attack is covered in the book (i think!). It is not a great system though. Just remember not to close your bishop with …e6. Play c5-Nf6-Nc6 and Bg4 or Bf5 before …e6.
I think that i missed it, because White can play the Stonewall in a more flexible way starting with the move 1.f4 and at some point , together with the editorial team, we decided not to cover the 1st move sidelines in the book. I couldn’t match Mikhalevski’s thoroughness, so i saw no point doing it."

and regarding the English line with 2.e4:

" This chapter was supposed to be a short one, giving basic guidelines of a “starter repertoire”.
Certainly, in that position 2.e4 is a move no doubt, although a rare one (after 1.c4) and (imho) a dubious one after 2…d5. It most certainly will lead to the type of exchange French we covered with Jacob in “Playing the French”.
In the resulting IQP position, Black plays Nc6-Nf6-Bb4-Qd6 and puts his rooks at e8 and d8. If i recall correctly, after the move a3 we gave two options for Black. One was to play Ba5 and put the bishop to b6 in order to put pressure at the center and the other one was Bxc3 following a positional masterpiece of the 13-year old Carlsen!
I hope this makes some sense to you!"

(if you want to visit the relevant discussion, it is here:
http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/blog/6199#comments)
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #34 - 10/12/17 at 04:10:31
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Templare2 wrote on 10/11/17 at 23:14:58:
The book is fantastic! Only one omission: i can't find the line 1.d4  2. e3. 3.Bd3 and f4


Play 1...d5, 2...Nf6, 3...Nc6!, and 4...Nb4. Take the bishop if White lets you, or put your own on f5 if he moves it.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #33 - 10/11/17 at 23:14:58
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The book is fantastic! Only one omission: i can't find the line 1.d4  2. e3. 3.Bd3 and f4
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #32 - 10/08/17 at 11:16:00
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phonological_loop wrote on 10/07/17 at 18:23:25:
As a returning club player searching for a black repertoire, I bought a few books and experimented with various things, and generally wasted a lot of time that should've been spent playing. But if I could go back in time, I would just tell myself to buy Ntirlis's playing 1. e4 e5 and 1. d4 d5.


Indeed!
It's a shame these were not available when I began playing serious chess. Now because of them, I am switching back to the classical openings I used to be playing.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #31 - 10/07/17 at 18:23:25
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I bought the book on the Forward Chess app a few days ago and just found the time to look through it.

In short, it is excellent. I especially appreciate the detailed coverage of the other d-pawn openings (the ones that avoid 2. c4), since I face those the most while playing online. The repertoire presented for them is simple, direct, and fits together nicely with the suggested QGD lines.

As a returning club player searching for a black repertoire, I bought a few books and experimented with various things, and generally wasted a lot of time that should've been spent playing. But if I could go back in time, I would just tell myself to buy Ntirlis's playing 1. e4 e5 and 1. d4 d5.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #30 - 10/07/17 at 18:00:02
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I usually buy electronic books these days whenever possible to save space on my book shelf, but I thought I´d make an exception for this one since I was already impressed by "Playing 1.e4 e5". The hardcover is well worth the extra money.

This book is already my favourite for the opening book of the year.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #29 - 10/07/17 at 14:12:27
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Thanks Rene, I'm looking forward to getting my hands on a hard copy soon.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #28 - 10/07/17 at 13:19:35
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He uses solid classical lines that merge beautifully with the QGD: after all the move-order subtleties are navigated, you get a fully equal or better position with ...Nf6, ...d5, ...c5 ...e6 and ...b6 most of the time. Against the Blackmar-Diemer, d5 is vacated by capturing on e4 (and f3), then ...e6 comes (the Euwe system).

The theory and move-order issues are covered thoroughly. For example, after a private meeting at a tournament, Avrukh had asked Ntirlis's permission to use one of these ideas in Avrukh's own book GM Rep 11. Avrukh published it, then Adam's defeated Karjakin with it!

Against the Catalan, we get 4.dxc4 with ...a6 and ...Nc6, where Back goes for active play and may sacrifice his b pawn. It's a current theoretical hotspot, and this section looks like part of a GM Rep book. Part of this section had been jointly developed with Aagard before being included in this book.

It's a new book, so beyond that I don't think I should go into detail.

Edit: oops, fllg beat me to it while I was writing this! Agree with everything.
« Last Edit: 10/07/17 at 18:31:08 by ReneDescartes »  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #27 - 10/07/17 at 13:15:20
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The book is excellent in all aspects. I quite like the format with chapters introducing the general ideas followed by the theoretical coverage. Especially the introduction to the Queen´s Gambit Exchange is very illuminating for someone with very limited experience with this structure like me.

Regarding the recommendation against the d-pawn specials it is generally based on Black playing ...0-0, ...c5, ...b6 and ...Ba6 or ...Bb7 if appropriate.

Against the BDG it is the Euwe-Defence with delayed castling.

The whole repertoire is based on solid lines allowing Black to gradually equalize and if White plays to ambitiously he may even take over the initiative.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #26 - 10/07/17 at 10:42:57
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Anyone who has the book can kindly tell me what is roughly the repertoire vs. "minor" lines? I mean vs. Colle, London, Ritcher-Veresov, Blackmar-Diemer, etc. I am unsure on buying the book for now, unless I know a bit more about these lines... Thanks.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #25 - 10/05/17 at 18:48:16
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LeeRoth wrote on 10/01/17 at 04:31:55:
fling wrote on 09/30/17 at 22:22:24:
LeeRoth wrote on 09/30/17 at 19:59:20:
It's on Forward Chess.  I bought it there the day it came out.


Was it for Apple or Android? I have Android, but don't see any new books later than Best Play. Been waiting for Nikos book for some time now!


Apple.  The new Tal book is there too.


I asked ForwardChess, and it turns out it was quite simple. I hadn't updated the app. After that, I could buy the book!
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #24 - 10/03/17 at 20:22:45
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phonological_loop wrote on 09/30/17 at 16:10:20:
Where do you see that, grandpatzer? It strangely appears as "Out of print" on Amazon.


I only checked a few major online shops and to this day I see it available from newinchess.com and scacco.it
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #23 - 10/01/17 at 04:31:55
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fling wrote on 09/30/17 at 22:22:24:
LeeRoth wrote on 09/30/17 at 19:59:20:
It's on Forward Chess.  I bought it there the day it came out.


Was it for Apple or Android? I have Android, but don't see any new books later than Best Play. Been waiting for Nikos book for some time now!


Apple.  The new Tal book is there too.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #22 - 09/30/17 at 22:22:24
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LeeRoth wrote on 09/30/17 at 19:59:20:
It's on Forward Chess.  I bought it there the day it came out.


Was it for Apple or Android? I have Android, but don't see any new books later than Best Play. Been waiting for Nikos book for some time now!
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #21 - 09/30/17 at 19:59:20
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It's on Forward Chess.  I bought it there the day it came out.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #20 - 09/30/17 at 17:15:52
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It was available on Amazon from a third-party seller yesterday. But there were only two left! I think this book will be very popular.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #19 - 09/30/17 at 16:10:20
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Where do you see that, grandpatzer? It strangely appears as "Out of print" on Amazon.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #18 - 09/26/17 at 19:46:44
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I see that the book is now available.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #17 - 07/13/17 at 22:19:00
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Ametanoitos wrote on 06/09/17 at 10:17:00:
Hello wolfsblut,

Yes, both the KIA and English have been included and the KIA is an update to the line we were offering in the PTF book.

The book is at the editing phase now. I think that we need at least 5-6 weeks before the book becomes a real thing sitting on the selves, but to be honest this is just a personal estimation and in reality i have no clue!


If I'm not misunderstanding, then isn't this a complete answer to Flank openings (barring really eccentric options like 1. b3 or 1. b4). You're basically saying that the book covers 1. c4, 1. Nf3 and 1. d4 in one tome. If that's true, I think it's well worth advertising. One of the problems with my repertoire is exactly the move orders from the flank openings (I play mostly QID and NID). For instance  1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e6 3.Nf3 Bb4 4.Qc2 O-O is a bit awkward because it looks a lot like a traditional 1. d4 line yet plays VERY differently due to the lack of central tension. I think it's also probably a tiny bit worse for Black than the true Nimzo.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #16 - 06/09/17 at 13:44:34
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That is really nice!
Thank you for your answer.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #15 - 06/09/17 at 10:17:00
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Hello wolfsblut,

Yes, both the KIA and English have been included and the KIA is an update to the line we were offering in the PTF book.

The book is at the editing phase now. I think that we need at least 5-6 weeks before the book becomes a real thing sitting on the selves, but to be honest this is just a personal estimation and in reality i have no clue!
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #14 - 06/07/17 at 19:18:37
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Hi Nikos,
in the past you were thinking about writing some new stuff about the Kings Indian Attack (1.Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 e6 and probably also about 1.c4 e6 2.e4 in your forthcoming book. How was your decision? Pointing to your former book about the French or including it in your new book?
Looking forward to your book!
P.S. Is there a chance to get knowing when the book is about to appear?
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #13 - 04/21/17 at 19:17:29
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I totally agree. I have Nikos's book on the French and I think it is the best repertoire book I own. And I play only his Nd2 rep choice. The book is both inspirational and instructive.

I play the nimzo as Black and QG vs 3.Nf3 (both Ragozin and QGD) so I am expecting he would give us a new a good weapon (again). Very important is a good system in the London/Jobava attack/Colle for practical reasons (everybody plays this way nowadays).

Thx
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #12 - 04/21/17 at 18:51:05
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Also, I'd like to point out that it's too much to expect (as readers) to like all of the variations chosen in a repertoire book.  I'm happy if a book has interesting ideas that stimulate me generally, and if I can use at least 25% or so of the recommended lines.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #11 - 04/20/17 at 13:32:01
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While I intuitively prefer the Tartakower to classical Nbd7 variations my loyalty is far from absolute. I already have the books of Sadler and Cox, which are sufficient if White is willing to do some work him/herself. So for me neglecting the Tartakower is a plus. At the other hand I'm skeptical of those ...Nbd7 variations, but given the quality of the Tarrasch book I'm willing to change. Indeed this

"a more "risky"/play-for-the-win alternative"
probably will be decisive, as your Tarrasch book was somewhat lacking in this respect imo. Not that I blame you for it - it just made me decide not to play this opening, which of course totally is my own responsibility.
Researching ...b6 against 5.Bf4 may be a very good reason to buy your new book though. There are some very interesting, very sharp and very promising gambit lines for Black.
  

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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #10 - 04/20/17 at 04:34:00
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Thanks for the response, I'm really looking forward to your book!
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #9 - 04/18/17 at 20:37:04
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Hello,

First of all, i recommend a more "risky"/play-for-the-win alternative in the Bg5 lines with h6-Nbd7 and ...c5, with ...c6 and ...a6 as has been played by Aronian. The main line of this system, according to my analysis, seems to be a very unclear position with chances for both sides.  Although, in my experience, the solid ...c5 plan at club level suffices to play for the win as well. I have inserted in the relevant chapter some of my own games at club level play where i obtained slightly better and safe positions after the opening. Also, it is absolutely stunning hiw Kramnik is playing this line for the win, and these instructive examples from his own praxis are also analysed in this chapter.

There will also be chapters for all the sidelines and a chapter against London/Colle/Torre based on the way the great Taimanov used to meet these systems. A system that has become fashionable lately. There is plenty of new analysis there. The idea is to reduce the number of "exact theory" and try to reach some typical positions.

Also, there is going to be plenty of material on typical IQP, Haning Pawns, Rubinstein-stryctyre, 2QPI- structure and plenty of "general instruction" material complementing the material.

For a small taste about the hanging pawns, you can see this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zd6ZReM4u1g
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #8 - 04/18/17 at 19:45:26
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In an opening like this (the ...Nbd7 QGD), since there isn't a ton of theory it would be nice to have another option covered as well--Lasker's Defense, Tartakower's, etc.  But considering that the Catalan is also covered, I understand that there might not be much space. 

But in general I think that playing an opening like the QGD is best seen as playing a family of openings, and it's nice to be able to mix and match subvariations to taste.  Of course I don't know what lines are being covered, but 1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Nf3 d5 4.d4 Be7 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 0-0 7.Rc1 Nbd7 8.e3 c5 9.cxd5 Nxd5 10.Bxe7 Nxe7 11.Be2 b6 12.dxc5 Nxc5 13.b4 Qxd1+ 14.Rxd1 Nd7 as in one recent Kramnik game is not the most exciting stuff!

But I'm looking forward to seeing it.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #7 - 04/18/17 at 19:10:44
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One might think there isn't much room for risky play in that line 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bg5 Be7 5. e3 h6 6. Bh4 Nbd7 7. Rc1 O-O 8. Nf3 c5 (by whatever move order) ...
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #6 - 04/18/17 at 17:15:32
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Hi Nikos,

I am playing the KID/Modern/Pirc and have good results but people are preparing for my KID although they are a 1.e4 player. So I am thinking about a solid backup repertoire based on the NID. Against 1.Nf3 I would play 1…d5 and against the move order 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 I would play 3…d5 so I cannot get move-ordered. So the big question for me is if you cover 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Sf3 and give some explanation what are the pros/cons of 3.Nc3/3.Nf3, because I have no idea about 1.d4 d5. Another question is if the lines are solid but dry or if they are a little bit more risky but with chances to outplay an opponent.

Thanks for answering all the questions we have.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #5 - 04/18/17 at 16:26:56
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Disappointed Nikos has gone for the 'fashionable' ...Nbd7 line vs. the Old Bg5 Mainline. I thought the Tartakower would have been a dead certainty, given: I recall you mentioning that you attended group coaching sessions with Geller, who was a great practitioner of the Tartakower.

I'll probably still buy it, to see recommendations vs. the other lines, however, my loyalty to the Tartakower is absolute.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #4 - 04/18/17 at 14:14:34
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Ok. As I understand it is as following: 1.d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 Be7 5. Nf3 Nbd7 or 4. Nf3 Be7 5. Bf4  0-0 6. e3 b6. Right?
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #3 - 04/18/17 at 14:04:21
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Thank you very much for the feedback. So no Tartakower Variation vs. the Bg5 Queen's Gambit Declined and what is exactly the Nbd7 with c5 in mind variation? And, are you covering all the non-Queen's Gambit options for White, too? I mean London, Colle, Blackmar Diemer, 1.d4 d5 2.Bg5 etc.

Thanks again!

  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #2 - 04/18/17 at 10:30:17
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Hello. Thanks for the interest.

In short, I advocate the h6+ Nh5 in the exchange, the h6 + Nbd7 with ...c5 in mind in the Bg5 lines and ...b6 lines against Bf4. I offer dxc4 + a6 as my Anti Catalan weapon and I give solutions against Reti and Anti Catalan move orders.

These lines are not new or "secret". My model players are mainly Kramnik followed by Aronian and Carlsen.

These lines have been tested recently by people I have seconded and the last couple of months only the files have been enriched greatly by their feedback and experience. In that respect, this is clearly the less "personal" book I have authored. A lot of people (most of them GMs) have contributed really a lot. And most probably they ll offer more small details here and there before the book is finalized.

I understand that people want the book out as quickly as possible but QC has high editing standards and this process takes a while to complete. My experience so far has thought me that the presentation of the material, the language and the selection of what stays in and what is thrown out, is at least as important with the actual chess analysis. In that respect, I considered the editor of Playing 1.e5 e5 essentially a co-author, although he was very humble to admit it.
  
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Re: Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
Reply #1 - 04/17/17 at 14:07:31
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I dont think Nikos has confirmed which lines he is planning. He did hint at them in the QC blog by naming players that had been playing them and a couple of readers thought they knew variation but i cant recall what it was.
  

"As Mikhail Tal would say ' Let's have a bit of hooliganism! '"

Victor Bologan.
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Playing 1.d4 d5 A Classical Repertoire, Ntirlis
04/17/17 at 12:33:14
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I am happy to see this forthcoming book in Quality Chess Publishing Schedule, considering that the 1.e4 e5 book by same author was so good IMHO. Anyone has perhaps a bit more info on what defenses are going to be suggested in the repertoire for Black?

Thanks.
  
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