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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith (Read 13251 times)
bragesjo
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #21 - 08/08/17 at 16:03:58
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I have not got time to check lines properly until the weekend however some things are a bit odd.

While there are a huge biografy some books are realy missing. Some of Avrukhs book are mentioned but not hes d-pawns special book! Cox has a book mentioned but not hes d-pawns special book!

And a line called Bogo Indian looks like some sort of Queens Gambit declined where black transposes to Bogo Indian Be7 line with d5 already played by black and white has in turn played the suboptimal e3 with a Bishop at d2.

A line I would call Colle with c4 does the book call Queens Indian. It might be a transposing but I don know since I dont play QID but it might a some sort of e3 system. Cox book and Smiths book first appears not to meet at all but it reaches each other after different move orders and follows each other untill move 16.

An other funny thing is that repertour can transpose to Panov attack. I played a Panov tournanamnet recently at ICCF and almost everyone of my games with both sides ended up in a drawish positions and I dont mean computer evaluations. However there might be improvments over the Panov book I used in my white games.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #20 - 08/07/17 at 05:52:16
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testing

This thread "disappeared" -- I was only able to find it by using the search function.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #19 - 08/06/17 at 18:20:43
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RdC wrote on 08/06/17 at 08:49:58:
It's rather more a reversed version of  Kings Indian Attack lines against the French. Those that might go 1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. g3 Nc6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1 b5 9. e5

I don't think he considers the madder version of that system, the reversed version of where Black plays .. b6 and .. Bb7, Qc7 and O-O-O with the idea of advancing the h or g pawns for a Kingside attack.

Before the main lines of the Kings Indian were developed in the 1950s, the idea of an early e3 would be used. The attacking methods for White seen in the Kings Indian Attack were first seen in the Kings Indian for Black. In their day, they caused the e3 approach to be abandoned. Will Axel Smith's advocacy of it cause a revival?


Well, in olden days e4 stuff against the KID was considered just better for White.  That's the picture in e.g. Fine's Practical Chess Openings from 1948, in which I see no mention of this e3 setup.

From what I was aware of, in the reversed version of that KIA vs. French main line, Black may prefer not to go for ...e4.  I recalled an old bit from the first edition of ECO (1978 -- of note, the relevant section was written by Uhlmann):  1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 O-O 5. e3 d6 6. Be2 Nbd7 7. O-O e5 8. b4 Re8 9. a4 ed 10. ed c5 11. Rb1 cb 12. Rxb4 Nb8 13. h3 Nc6 (Spiridonov-Hort, Brno 1975) 14. Rb2 d5 equal according to Hort.  I also recalled Kozomara-R. Byrne (a striking game by Byrne), in which I would have thought that ...e4 was encouraged by White's Bb2.
« Last Edit: 08/06/17 at 19:43:34 by kylemeister »  
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RdC
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #18 - 08/06/17 at 08:49:58
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kylemeister wrote on 07/17/17 at 18:49:42:
I would presume it is that kind of thing.  Incidentally I recall the term "King's Indian Attack Reversed" from an annotation from the 1970s.



It's rather more a reversed version of  Kings Indian Attack lines against the French. Those that might go 1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. g3 Nc6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1 b5 9. e5

I don't think he considers the madder version of that system, the reversed version of where Black plays .. b6 and .. Bb7, Qc7 and O-O-O with the idea of advancing the h or g pawns for a Kingside attack.

Before the main lines of the Kings Indian were developed in the 1950s, the idea of an early e3 would be used. The attacking methods for White seen in the Kings Indian Attack were first seen in the Kings Indian for Black. In their day, they caused the e3 approach to be abandoned. Will Axel Smith's advocacy of it cause a revival?
  
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exigentsky
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #17 - 08/06/17 at 07:50:35
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I'm pretty excited to see what he has in store for the QGD. That will be the biggest test for the setup since e3 before bringing out the bishop isn't usually good in those structures. You typically want to bring it to f4 or g5 and if not, you play a Catalan (often with b3, Bb2 later). It's weird that these days even with main line openings, I have more difficulties with the QGD than the Slav complex.

I'm also eager to see his handling of the Symmetrical English. I rarely get anything when I face it. It's like a brick wall and I've tried a lot of lines.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #16 - 08/05/17 at 17:08:48
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I wanted to make it clear that despite what I wrote, I like the book.  I just wanted to point out what I believe to be an omission that might require another source if one chooses the Anti-Queen's Gambit option.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #15 - 08/05/17 at 16:14:29
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Strange that after so many years of playing the Meran and Anti-Meran as White, and some as Black, that I have no knowledge of 6.Bd2 at all.
« Last Edit: 08/05/17 at 19:22:51 by ErictheRed »  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #14 - 08/05/17 at 11:23:46
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I ordered the book yesterday. It will arrive early the next week.
  
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bragesjo
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #13 - 08/05/17 at 11:20:28
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About club player aspect I was not that clear after all. I did  not meant ultimate mainlines or following them for 20 moves!

I meant  not even entering a  major system where the mainlines starts to spread out.
Since computer era the number of clubplayer games  that entered the startposition of a mainline like for example Najdorf (where white has many mainlines to  choose from) has decreased. I can add that older veteran player are more likely to enter a start position in either  1 d4 or 1 e4 openings. So personally  I am more surprised to reach a startposition of mainline or be in a book position after more than 7 moves when I play black.

I can give  an other example. Vs a 1900 clubplayer I meet  closed Sicilian.  I played 2 .. e6.
He knew how to develop he's pieces but did not know the exact move order so he made a mistake so I got  in a favorable d5 break and  I was slightly better according to computer but the game ended up in a draw. An other example a other club player  played 2  a3 vs sicilian. I played g6 mainline. Opponent starts to think for a very very long time before settling the odd looking 3 c3 and after the game asked how theory goes...
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #12 - 08/05/17 at 04:01:49
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tp2205 wrote on 08/04/17 at 23:51:00:
ErictheRed wrote on 08/01/17 at 22:18:20:
Can anyone say what he recommends vs the Semi-Slav, i.e. in the Meran?  That's the only place where this book overlaps my repertoire I think, but I'd buy the book if I liked his Meran treatment enough.


He suggests 6. Bd2.

So far I could not be happier with the book. It is the introduction into the world of 1 d4/c4/Nf3 I always wanted. Some of things I like are
- move orders/typical plans/pawn structures are explained clearly enough to make this book accessible even to life-long e4-players like me
- no short cuts (unlike some Colle/London repertoire books)
- the amount of variations is manageable
- really quite a few insights of what to aim for => no problems with new/unknown moves

I have looked at many 1 d4 repertoires (e.g. by Schandorff, Watson even Colle or London based repertoires) but they did not work for me. I was looking for a way to broaden my chess horizon without having to memorize many moves (age takes its toll) but in these repertoires there were either too many positions which I did not understand (well enough) or they were too simplistic for my taste. .

I think this is the book to beat for the opening book of the year award.


So he recommends 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 e6 3.e3 Nf6 4.c4 c6 5.Nc3 (in various move orders) 5...Nbd7 6.Bd2 versus the Meran but another recommendation is 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.b3 (Anti-Queen's Gambit) but I can't find any mention of 4...c6.  Of course 5.Nc3 transposes to the systems recommended by Delchev and Kosten and is a good system but it is more theory to learn.  He also has 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e3 e6 4.c4 Be7 5.b3 but in that move order he is careful not to recommend b3 when Black can still play the Meran. 
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #11 - 08/04/17 at 23:51:00
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ErictheRed wrote on 08/01/17 at 22:18:20:
Can anyone say what he recommends vs the Semi-Slav, i.e. in the Meran?  That's the only place where this book overlaps my repertoire I think, but I'd buy the book if I liked his Meran treatment enough.


He suggests 6. Bd2.

So far I could not be happier with the book. It is the introduction into the world of 1 d4/c4/Nf3 I always wanted. Some of things I like are
- move orders/typical plans/pawn structures are explained clearly enough to make this book accessible even to life-long e4-players like me
- no short cuts (unlike some Colle/London repertoire books)
- the amount of variations is manageable
- really quite a few insights of what to aim for => no problems with new/unknown moves

I have looked at many 1 d4 repertoires (e.g. by Schandorff, Watson even Colle or London based repertoires) but they did not work for me. I was looking for a way to broaden my chess horizon without having to memorize many moves (age takes its toll) but in these repertoires there were either too many positions which I did not understand (well enough) or they were too simplistic for my taste. .

I think this is the book to beat for the opening book of the year award.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #10 - 08/04/17 at 21:10:50
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bragesjo wrote on 08/02/17 at 15:21:24:
I only want to make a clarification about my post about "traditional mainlines" and clubplayer aspect. Even if clubplayers dont play "traditional mainlines" clubplayers rarely knows theory on the line that they are playing instead. During the years I have even met FMs who are out of book before move 7 in "traditional mainlines".  I can also add that younger players rarely knows theory on old fashioned lines not popular by todays elite players.


This is why I think the whole "too much theory" argument is rarely applicable outside of 2000+. First of all, people play sidelines all the time in openings that start mainline. They do this to avoid diverse theory for things like the Sicilian or Grunfeld and these lines tend to be more positional in their nature so you can play well if you understand the position. Secondly, even if I know only 10 moves of Najdorf theory, my opponents generally also know only about that much. Just because there is a lot of theory on a line and a lot of computer analysis can be done doesn't mean it actually has until you get to really high levels. Plus, natural moves are often good enough even if not optimal and the better player in that position will still triumph most times.

My interest in side lines isn't to avoid theory because I'm scared of how much there is to learn and what my opponent could know. It's just to make myself a complete player and to surprise people a bit.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #9 - 08/02/17 at 15:21:24
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I only want to make a clarification about my post about "traditional mainlines" and clubplayer aspect. Even if clubplayers dont play "traditional mainlines" clubplayers rarely knows theory on the line that they are playing instead. During the years I have even met FMs who are out of book before move 7 in "traditional mainlines".  I can also add that younger players rarely knows theory on old fashioned lines not popular by todays elite players.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #8 - 08/01/17 at 22:18:20
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Can anyone say what he recommends vs the Semi-Slav, i.e. in the Meran?  That's the only place where this book overlaps my repertoire I think, but I'd buy the book if I liked his Meran treatment enough.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #7 - 08/01/17 at 14:16:04
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I did not read this book, but I have read Axel Smith's book in the past and it was probably the best chess book I have ever read
  
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