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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith (Read 25907 times)
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #39 - 09/23/17 at 08:11:12
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CanadianClub wrote on 09/22/17 at 21:52:58:
We theory-fans have enough humour to play a line like 2...e6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Nc3 and expect any advantage?  Grin


The recommendations are 4.b3 or 4.d4 and no, no advantage is to be expected here. Instead you get an interesting position with chances to outplay your opponent.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #38 - 09/22/17 at 21:52:58
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I am looking for something in the 1.Nf3 d5. Maybe 2.e3 would be an option. What do you think? Are the Panov and QGD lines well covered?

We theory-fans have enough humour to play a line like 2...e6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Nc3 and expect any advantage?  Grin
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #37 - 09/20/17 at 21:49:47
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You're right. I was naorrow minded with thinking of the Chebanenko as a regular slav.
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #36 - 09/20/17 at 21:34:45
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Jupp53 wrote on 09/20/17 at 18:52:25:
In Chapter 20 the book gives on p.307

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 Bf5 5.Nc3 e6 and omits 5... a6. I couldn't find it elsewhere.



I believe this is covered in the "Irregular Slavs" chapter in the ...a6 Slav lines via the move order 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 a6 5.Nc3 Bf5.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #35 - 09/20/17 at 18:52:25
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In Chapter 20 the book gives on p.307

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 Bf5 5.Nc3 e6 and omits 5... a6. I couldn't find it elsewhere.

Does anyone know a good recommendation for white how to play this line?

Looking into the databases 6.Nh4 seems acceptable to me, leading to some interesting games. But from a beginner with this line this is to take by caution and I will need some own games before being able to judge this.

  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #34 - 08/14/17 at 16:46:48
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The last 1 Posts were moved here from General Chess [move by] RoleyPoley.
  

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Opening book arranged the chapters in random order
Reply #33 - 08/14/17 at 15:05:46
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At page 17 of "e3 Poison", the author writes "I will not go as far as a recent opening book that arranged the chapters in random order". Do you know what book is Mr. Smith referring to?
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #32 - 08/09/17 at 10:50:21
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Stigma wrote on 08/09/17 at 09:08:27:
I'm not a Modern Benoni player, but that is some claim! White is a tempo down if he goes e3-e4 and has been deprived of all the lines that are considered really dangerous against the MB: The Taimanov attack, the Nf3/Bf4 line, the Modern main line, the Fianchetto, the Kapengut.

I suppose it's true that if even this e3 stuff is good for White, the Modern Benoni is simply a bad opening that nobody should be playing. I wonder what John Emms would say to that?



It appears that the book doest play e4 for a long time but plays moves like Bd2 a4 etc etc and in some samples line white does not play e4 at all.

A funny thing to note is that via other moves order from black white plays some Benoni mainlines..
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #31 - 08/09/17 at 09:23:29
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kylemeister wrote on 08/09/17 at 04:26:36:
Re 1. e3, I noticed a young IM (Lucas van Foreest) playing it a couple of days ago.  I can't help being reminded of a book from 45 years ago (Baroque Chess Openings by Richard Wincor) which described 1. d3 as "the perfect opening."   Smiley

I've played 1.d3 a few times in rapid. It's not entirely bad and often gains a minute or two on the clock.

One of my opponents commented after 1.d3: "Were you too weak to move the pawn two squares?"  Grin
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #30 - 08/09/17 at 09:08:27
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bragesjo wrote on 08/08/17 at 21:25:09:
The chapters starts via after 1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 g6 3 c4 Bg7 4 e3 c5 5 d5 0-0 6 Nc3 e6 7 Be2 exd5 8 cxd5 d6 9 0-0

Smith writes that one can argue that Benoni is such a bad opening that one would not mind facing it a tempo down. Nakumura has played this line and a very quick e4. However quck look indicates that Smiths idea is to not play e4 at once since is more difficult for black to attack anything if there is no pawn at e4.

I'm not a Modern Benoni player, but that is some claim! White is a tempo down if he goes e3-e4 and has been deprived of all the lines that are considered really dangerous against the MB: The Taimanov attack, the Nf3/Bf4 line, the Modern main line, the Fianchetto, the Kapengut.

I suppose it's true that if even this e3 stuff is good for White, the Modern Benoni is simply a bad opening that nobody should be playing. I wonder what John Emms would say to that?
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #29 - 08/09/17 at 08:24:02
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ErictheRed wrote on 08/09/17 at 04:20:36:
I'm always happy with a repertoire book if I can use at least 10-20% of the material in it, personally


I agree, I will look at hes Panov lines as part of my white 1 e4 repertoar.

I will also look at bit closer at lines that are part of my black repertoar.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #28 - 08/09/17 at 04:26:36
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A quick thought re Smith-Degraeve:  a comparison is to 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 0-0 6. Be2 e5 7. d5 c5 8. 0-0 (instead of 8. Bg5) Ne8 which I've seen given as leading to equality (a game I recall is Timman-Tal, used in Pawn Structure Chess and in Drazen Marovic's Dynamic Pawn Play in Chess); at any rate I'd be surprised if Black is worse with an extra tempo.

Re 1. e3, I noticed a young IM (Lucas van Foreest) playing it a couple of days ago.  I can't help being reminded of a book from 45 years ago (Baroque Chess Openings by Richard Wincor) which described 1. d3 as "the perfect opening."   Smiley
« Last Edit: 08/09/17 at 07:17:00 by kylemeister »  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #27 - 08/09/17 at 04:20:36
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 08/09/17 at 03:14:39:
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It would probably be better to stick to the early e3 in lines with ...e6 or ...d5 and play more actively in the pure West Indian systems.
Since he offers 1.e3 as a possible move order, it's a little late to be recommending something more active against say 1...g6.


Understood.  That was my point when I said that he may be taking the e3 concept a little too far, though readers don't need to.  I'm always happy with a repertoire book if I can use at least 10-20% of the material in it, personally.  Who plays everything that one author in one book says to play?  I'd buy the book if I liked his Meran coverage (which I haven't seen), but I'm skeptical of 6.Bd2, so... I'll wait until I can check it out on a bookshelf somewhere.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #26 - 08/09/17 at 03:14:39
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Quote:
It would probably be better to stick to the early e3 in lines with ...e6 or ...d5 and play more actively in the pure West Indian systems.
Since he offers 1.e3 as a possible move order, it's a little late to be recommending something more active against say 1...g6.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #25 - 08/09/17 at 02:51:19
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It sounds to me like Axel is taking the e3 concept a little too far, after 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7, 4.e3?! is a really tame move.  Playable and perhaps "post-theoretical" like he says, but tame.  It would probably be better to stick to the early e3 in lines with ...e6 or ...d5 and play more actively in the pure West Indian systems.  Naturally there are plenty of good choices; I'm partial to the Smyslov-Petrosian system when I want to play something offbeat with little theory: 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Nf3 0-0 5.Bg5 and 6.e3.  At least the bishop gets outside of the pawn chain, and the pawn on e3 still denies Black use of the d4-square, making him look for alternative sources of counterplay.

Interestingly I see only one game in my database where Smith has played the position after 4.e3 himself, though he may have played this system more times by transposition (and I may not have access to many of his games).  However he did seem to get a very nice game out of the opening; he ended up in a Czech Benoni type setup where Black had a clear extra tempo, but had used that tempo to fianchetto his king's bishop, which is supposed to be worse than developing it to e7 in that sort of "Full Benoni" pawn structure:

  
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