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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith (Read 17012 times)
ReneDescartes
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #66 - 12/15/17 at 01:26:33
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@PaulCumbers,
That's true. I have a rather worked-out repertoire of my own design with respect to early move-orders, and I have thought about many of these transpositional matters and made choices for the first few moves. If White has worked on early move-order issues and Black hasn't, Black could get move-ordered. But if Black has done a lot of this and White hasn't done so much, White could himself get move-ordered: avoiding d4, he finds himself in a symmetrical English; avoiding the English and hoping for a Zuckertort, he finds himself in a Semi-Tarrasch; etc., etc.

So, I guess, do some work on what to do against c4, d4 Nf3, and g3 in various combinations. In the end, you will have to either learn a new opening to plug the holes or give up some of your previous preventive measures and play an uncomfortable opening that you already know. I did the former, mostly.

One good method is to make one or two approaches thematic, choose multiple lines that feature the themes, and then fill in the holes. Themes might be, for example, a  ...c5 and ...b6 approach, a ...d5 and ...c5 approach, a ...d5 and ...e6  approach,  a ...d5 and ...c6 approach, or a ...c5 and ...e6 approach, as well as fianchetto solutions. A program like CPT or COW will find all the transpositions instantly and allow you to build an early-move-order practice model.

<Just read the previous post. CC beat me to it.>
« Last Edit: 12/15/17 at 15:44:09 by ReneDescartes »  
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CanadianClub
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #65 - 12/14/17 at 21:30:32
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The main goal of playing Nf3 is to confuse your opponents being flexible from move 1. Ideally we want to play something not in the repertoire of our foes. But if Black knows what he is doing... the game will transpose to a known line by both players.

For example,

1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nc6

is not ideal for me, as I want to play another line against the Chigorin (main lines without that quick e3). But very few people play the Chigorin, so maybe it's a good practical move order. And if someone enters on it... well, it's not the end of the world.

I'ts a question of putting some little work in the move orders, to avoid something but allowing other things in return. As GM Danielsen (yes, the one of the Polar Bear system) likes to say, the coin has two sides.

Smiley
  
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Paul Cumbers
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #64 - 12/14/17 at 20:40:47
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ReneDescartes wrote on 12/14/17 at 01:12:11:
OK, but there are scarier things than watching your opponent lock in his own bishop. White also has to ask "is he going to play ...e6? ...d4? ...b6? ...c5?" It's just a Reti or d-pawn special or something more normal. There's no diabolical system.

I'm trying to say that Black could easily find himself transposing into something he wouldn't normally play. Let's say Black's repertoire is something like:
  • 1.c4 e5
  • 1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nc6 3.d4 Bg4
  • 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 d4
  • 1.b3 e5
  • 1.Nf3 d5 2.b3 Bg4
  • 1.Nf3 d5 2.d4 e6 intending The Triangle, avoiding the Marshall Gambit.
Then after 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Black might stumble into (for example) some kind of non-1...e5 English line.
  
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Paul Cumbers
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #63 - 12/14/17 at 19:46:55
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kylemeister wrote on 12/14/17 at 02:00:01:
Paul Cumbers wrote on 12/14/17 at 00:10:11:
I can tell you from Black's point of view I would not like to see 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3! Is White going to play d4, c4, both, or neither?? I'd be tempted to try 2...Nc6 ("threatening" 3...e5), with the idea 3.c4 d4!?, but 3.Bb5!? or 3.d4 Bg4 might be good for White.

I'm not sure why 3...d4 gets "!?"; it's an old main line of the Reti (by the order 2. c4 d4 3. e3 Nc6) which as far as I know has basically been considered equal since way back.

Just my opinion... And it gives the game a more distinctive character. (See http://www.chesspublishing.com/content/12/sep16.htm#ret and http://www.chesspublishing.com/content/12/mar14.htm#ret). But yes, I could have left the "!?" off and still retained my meaning.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #62 - 12/14/17 at 02:00:01
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Paul Cumbers wrote on 12/14/17 at 00:10:11:
I can tell you from Black's point of view I would not like to see 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3! Is White going to play d4, c4, both, or neither?? I'd be tempted to try 2...Nc6 ("threatening" 3...e5), with the idea 3.c4 d4!?, but 3.Bb5!? or 3.d4 Bg4 might be good for White.


I'm not sure why 3...d4 gets "!?"; it's an old main line of the Reti (by the order 2. c4 d4 3. e3 Nc6) which as far as I know has basically been considered equal since way back.
  
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ReneDescartes
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #61 - 12/14/17 at 01:12:11
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OK, but there are scarier things than watching your opponent lock in his own bishop. White also has to ask "is he going to play ...e6? ...d4? ...b6? ...c5?" It's just a Reti or d-pawn special or something more normal. There's no diabolical system.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #60 - 12/14/17 at 00:10:11
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CanadianClub wrote on 09/22/17 at 21:52:58:
I am looking for something in the 1.Nf3 d5. Maybe 2.e3 would be an option.

I can tell you from Black's point of view I would not like to see 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3! Is White going to play d4, c4, both, or neither?? I'd be tempted to try 2...Nc6 ("threatening" 3...e5), with the idea 3.c4 d4!?, but 3.Bb5!? or 3.d4 Bg4 might be good for White.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #59 - 11/11/17 at 02:41:36
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> As predecessor

1991: The Killer Grob by Michael Basman
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #58 - 11/10/17 at 18:25:21
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Quote:
Well, the precedent was set by Lackdawala's "Ferocious" London. Perhaps "The a3 Chain Saw: You Can Beat Morphy" and "White is Equal!" by Adorjan? We just got a taste of what opening preparation can still do in Kasparov's recent rapid games. In nearly every game he had a real advantage in the early middlegame. Today's tendency is partly just fashion led by Carlsen, even if computers do analyze to equality more often now than before.Smiley


As predecessor I would quote the Summerscale's "A Killer Chess Opening Repertoire" (Cadogan, 1999). Unluckily the Carlsen's tendency to play untheoretically is usually followed by some 400 pages dense book written by the boring GM Stockfish.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #57 - 11/10/17 at 03:30:53
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ReneDescartes wrote on 10/30/17 at 17:38:09:
Igor wrote on 10/29/17 at 21:41:26:
there are already rumors about "c3 Butcher" coming springtime 2018  Smiley

Well, the precedent was set by Lackdawala's "Ferocious" London. Perhaps "The a3 Chain Saw: You Can Beat Morphy" and "White is Equal!" by Adorjan? We just got a taste of what opening preparation can still do in Kasparov's recent rapid games. In nearly every game he had a real advantage in the early middlegame. Today's tendency is partly just fashion led by Carlsen, even if computers do analyze to equality more often now than before.

What is really poisonous? Kramnik described Botvinnik's preparations for his revenge match against Tal: "Everything was venomous, and well-perceived and regulated by [Botvinnik]." What were these venomous openings? Not quiet positional ones, as Tal had expected. Whereas Tal had expected g3 against the King's Indian, Botvinnik played...the Saemisch! Also against the Nimzo--the Saemisch and delayed Saemisch. Classic Botvinnik bulldozer setups with strong centers that restricted Black.


I looked through the Adorjan books. He really needed a stern editor (see also: 'Cyrus'). Style reminded me a bit of the autobiography of Klaus Kinski, 'Kinski Uncut', but not in a good way. Comes across as ... a bit deranged.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #56 - 11/09/17 at 12:50:50
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TD wrote on 10/28/17 at 14:08:27:
On QC's blog I read that Sadler had some negative points about the book in New In Chess (Yearbook?). Any comments about this?


Had a quick peruse of the review and his overall feeling is that there is a good book in there but poorly organised. I think he comments on the games being presented in some cases not actually fitting in with the philosphy of playing e3 (i,e some positions actually have e4 being played i think). Secondly, confusion about what lines Smith is actually proposing. I cant remember if he also picks out the issue Bragesjo does. He says that the book is aimed at the more serious player who can adapt to a more flexible opening repertoire than someone less skilled and simply looking for a set of openings to play,
  

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bragesjo
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #55 - 11/09/17 at 12:22:41
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The book has a weak coverage at the Panov Attack section.
The book does not cover 1 e4 c6  2 d4 d5 3 exd5 cxd5 4 c4 Nf6 5 Nc3 g6 6 Qb3 e6.

A similar line but with a Knight at f3 instead of c3 is covered and the book writes that black does not want to play this  e6 here but the recommended line does not transpose to the first line.

I discovered this since I decided to try Smiths Panov lines in a corr game.
I will not give any more details since I belive the games is secrets to the public according to tournamnet rules but I have other Panov books where the move is covered, I just wanted to point is out if anyone more is consdering to enter the Panov via some sorts of different move order.

Otherwise the Panov chapter looks interesting and better reommendations than  other books at several points.
  
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ReneDescartes
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #54 - 10/30/17 at 17:38:09
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Igor wrote on 10/29/17 at 21:41:26:
there are already rumors about "c3 Butcher" coming springtime 2018  Smiley

Well, the precedent was set by Lackdawala's "Ferocious" London. Perhaps "The a3 Chain Saw: You Can Beat Morphy" and "White is Equal!" by Adorjan? We just got a taste of what opening preparation can still do in Kasparov's recent rapid games. In nearly every game he had a real advantage in the early middlegame. Today's tendency is partly just fashion led by Carlsen, even if computers do analyze to equality more often now than before.

What is really poisonous? Kramnik described Botvinnik's preparations for his revenge match against Tal: "Everything was venomous, and well-perceived and regulated by [Botvinnik]." What were these venomous openings? Not quiet positional ones, as Tal had expected. Whereas Tal had expected g3 against the King's Indian, Botvinnik played...the Saemisch! Also against the Nimzo--the Saemisch and delayed Saemisch. Classic Botvinnik bulldozer setups with strong centers that restricted Black.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #53 - 10/30/17 at 08:29:01
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I'm considering 1.e3 (after I realized how much I dislike seeing 1.d4 e6). I notice that after 1.e3 e5 he goes into English lines.

Do his lines overlap with ones from Cumming's English book?
  
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bragesjo
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #52 - 10/30/17 at 07:40:32
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Igor wrote on 10/29/17 at 21:41:26:
there are already rumors about "c3 Butcher" coming springtime 2018  Smiley


There is already a 1 c3 DVD from white point of view so I am not surprised about any opening books or discs opening choices anymore.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #51 - 10/29/17 at 21:41:26
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there are already rumors about "c3 Butcher" coming springtime 2018  Smiley
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #50 - 10/29/17 at 19:37:38
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TD wrote on 10/28/17 at 14:08:27:
On QC's blog I read that Sadler had some negative points about the book in New In Chess (Yearbook?). Any comments about this?


Sadler does the reviews for the magazine, Flear for the the yearbook, so it is likely to be in the former. I havent recieved my copy yet so am not sure what these will be.
  

"As Mikhail Tal would say ' Let's have a bit of hooliganism! '"

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #49 - 10/28/17 at 14:08:27
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On QC's blog I read that Sadler had some negative points about the book in New In Chess (Yearbook?). Any comments about this?
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #48 - 10/12/17 at 04:05:34
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The ...f5 thrust is usually seen in the e4-d5 pawn chain lines to attack White's pawn center, but often weakening against other structures.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #47 - 10/11/17 at 22:12:43
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kylemeister wrote on 10/11/17 at 19:01:11:
I thought HgMan might have been referring to some other line, because I don't think of ...f5 as being a typical part of Black's play.


I don't know the theory of this particular line, but surely the ...f7-f5 pawn thrust is fairly typical of KID play, isn't it? And made all the easier in the absence of a pawn on e4 here. ...e7-e5-e4 chases the knight, ...f7-f5 locks the kingside. Pieces go to work. It seems fairly automatic to me. But maybe I should study it more carefully first.
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #46 - 10/11/17 at 19:01:11
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@Jupp53 -- I notice your opponent didn't go for 13. a3 (from e.g. Fischer-Miagmarsuren) -- I know it at least used to be thought that that is good for White (and that Black should play ...Ba6 before ...a4).

I thought HgMan might have been referring to some other line, because I don't think of ...f5 as being a typical part of Black's play.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #45 - 10/11/17 at 18:24:43
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tipau wrote on 10/11/17 at 11:58:17:
kylemeister wrote on 10/11/17 at 05:01:10:
What line is that, pray tell.


I believe the line goes 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7...



You could always play something "real" against the King's Indian and Grunfeld, while incorporating Axel's lines against other openings.  4.Nc3 and White still has a ton of options.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #44 - 10/11/17 at 12:17:36
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The line is nothing for short games. It's all about queenside attack against king side attack. You have to be exact as defender.
https://lichess.org/wm6SzxqY#70
The link leads to an engine-free game I played. It shows the possibilities for the "defender" in this structure. Having played the KIA some years I think it's very difficult against an opponent knowing how to attack on the queenside. There are many games outside with the defender not really knowing the structure and the importance of each tempo! In this case white has excellent winning chances.
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #43 - 10/11/17 at 12:12:17
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tipau wrote on 10/11/17 at 11:58:17:
KID is the weakest part of the repertoire from a practical perspective.


I also say the the chapter called Bogo Indian also looks very  weak for white, black get an improved version of Bogo Indian, what is the Bishop doing at d2 with a pawn at e3?
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #42 - 10/11/17 at 11:58:17
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kylemeister wrote on 10/11/17 at 05:01:10:
What line is that, pray tell.


I believe the line goes 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.e3 0-0 5.Be2 d6 6.Nc3 Nbd7 7.0-0 e5 8.Qc2 Re8 9.Rd1 e4 10.Nd2, although many other move orders are possible with 1.c4, 1.Nf3, 1.e3.

I have some experience playing the French and reached similar positions from the KIA. It never worried me there, so I don't mind playing it so much. However, I agree that the KID is the weakest part of the repertoire from a practical perspective.
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #41 - 10/11/17 at 05:01:10
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HgMan wrote on 10/11/17 at 04:07:50:
But: Smith's recommendation against the KID (or reversed KIA) look terrifying! It looks as though Black can clamp down on e4 with a pawn, thrust ...f5, and launch a rapid kingside attack while White slowly develops some kind of queenside advance. It looks as though White doesn't have any pieces on the kingside to slow Black's attack. I'll need to work on this further, but am I being a little too narrow-minded in my reading of the KID chapter? Can a pawn on e3 possibly frighten KID players?


What line is that, pray tell.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #40 - 10/11/17 at 04:07:50
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I've been enjoying this book, working through the chapters. It's informative, interesting, and refreshing to be reflecting on the plans and positions since move orders are almost non-existent (because things can always morph). I recommend the book.

But: Smith's recommendation against the KID (or reversed KIA) look terrifying! It looks as though Black can clamp down on e4 with a pawn, thrust ...f5, and launch a rapid kingside attack while White slowly develops some kind of queenside advance. It looks as though White doesn't have any pieces on the kingside to slow Black's attack. I'll need to work on this further, but am I being a little too narrow-minded in my reading of the KID chapter? Can a pawn on e3 possibly frighten KID players?
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #39 - 09/23/17 at 08:11:12
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CanadianClub wrote on 09/22/17 at 21:52:58:
We theory-fans have enough humour to play a line like 2...e6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Nc3 and expect any advantage?  Grin


The recommendations are 4.b3 or 4.d4 and no, no advantage is to be expected here. Instead you get an interesting position with chances to outplay your opponent.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #38 - 09/22/17 at 21:52:58
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I am looking for something in the 1.Nf3 d5. Maybe 2.e3 would be an option. What do you think? Are the Panov and QGD lines well covered?

We theory-fans have enough humour to play a line like 2...e6 3.c4 Nf6 4.Nc3 and expect any advantage?  Grin
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #37 - 09/20/17 at 21:49:47
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You're right. I was naorrow minded with thinking of the Chebanenko as a regular slav.
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #36 - 09/20/17 at 21:34:45
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Jupp53 wrote on 09/20/17 at 18:52:25:
In Chapter 20 the book gives on p.307

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 Bf5 5.Nc3 e6 and omits 5... a6. I couldn't find it elsewhere.



I believe this is covered in the "Irregular Slavs" chapter in the ...a6 Slav lines via the move order 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 a6 5.Nc3 Bf5.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #35 - 09/20/17 at 18:52:25
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In Chapter 20 the book gives on p.307

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.e3 Bf5 5.Nc3 e6 and omits 5... a6. I couldn't find it elsewhere.

Does anyone know a good recommendation for white how to play this line?

Looking into the databases 6.Nh4 seems acceptable to me, leading to some interesting games. But from a beginner with this line this is to take by caution and I will need some own games before being able to judge this.

  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #34 - 08/14/17 at 16:46:48
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The last 1 Posts were moved here from General Chess [move by] RoleyPoley.
  

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Opening book arranged the chapters in random order
Reply #33 - 08/14/17 at 15:05:46
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At page 17 of "e3 Poison", the author writes "I will not go as far as a recent opening book that arranged the chapters in random order". Do you know what book is Mr. Smith referring to?
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #32 - 08/09/17 at 10:50:21
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Stigma wrote on 08/09/17 at 09:08:27:
I'm not a Modern Benoni player, but that is some claim! White is a tempo down if he goes e3-e4 and has been deprived of all the lines that are considered really dangerous against the MB: The Taimanov attack, the Nf3/Bf4 line, the Modern main line, the Fianchetto, the Kapengut.

I suppose it's true that if even this e3 stuff is good for White, the Modern Benoni is simply a bad opening that nobody should be playing. I wonder what John Emms would say to that?



It appears that the book doest play e4 for a long time but plays moves like Bd2 a4 etc etc and in some samples line white does not play e4 at all.

A funny thing to note is that via other moves order from black white plays some Benoni mainlines..
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #31 - 08/09/17 at 09:23:29
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kylemeister wrote on 08/09/17 at 04:26:36:
Re 1. e3, I noticed a young IM (Lucas van Foreest) playing it a couple of days ago.  I can't help being reminded of a book from 45 years ago (Baroque Chess Openings by Richard Wincor) which described 1. d3 as "the perfect opening."   Smiley

I've played 1.d3 a few times in rapid. It's not entirely bad and often gains a minute or two on the clock.

One of my opponents commented after 1.d3: "Were you too weak to move the pawn two squares?"  Grin
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #30 - 08/09/17 at 09:08:27
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bragesjo wrote on 08/08/17 at 21:25:09:
The chapters starts via after 1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 g6 3 c4 Bg7 4 e3 c5 5 d5 0-0 6 Nc3 e6 7 Be2 exd5 8 cxd5 d6 9 0-0

Smith writes that one can argue that Benoni is such a bad opening that one would not mind facing it a tempo down. Nakumura has played this line and a very quick e4. However quck look indicates that Smiths idea is to not play e4 at once since is more difficult for black to attack anything if there is no pawn at e4.

I'm not a Modern Benoni player, but that is some claim! White is a tempo down if he goes e3-e4 and has been deprived of all the lines that are considered really dangerous against the MB: The Taimanov attack, the Nf3/Bf4 line, the Modern main line, the Fianchetto, the Kapengut.

I suppose it's true that if even this e3 stuff is good for White, the Modern Benoni is simply a bad opening that nobody should be playing. I wonder what John Emms would say to that?
  

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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #29 - 08/09/17 at 08:24:02
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ErictheRed wrote on 08/09/17 at 04:20:36:
I'm always happy with a repertoire book if I can use at least 10-20% of the material in it, personally


I agree, I will look at hes Panov lines as part of my white 1 e4 repertoar.

I will also look at bit closer at lines that are part of my black repertoar.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #28 - 08/09/17 at 04:26:36
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A quick thought re Smith-Degraeve:  a comparison is to 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 0-0 6. Be2 e5 7. d5 c5 8. 0-0 (instead of 8. Bg5) Ne8 which I've seen given as leading to equality (a game I recall is Timman-Tal, used in Pawn Structure Chess and in Drazen Marovic's Dynamic Pawn Play in Chess); at any rate I'd be surprised if Black is worse with an extra tempo.

Re 1. e3, I noticed a young IM (Lucas van Foreest) playing it a couple of days ago.  I can't help being reminded of a book from 45 years ago (Baroque Chess Openings by Richard Wincor) which described 1. d3 as "the perfect opening."   Smiley
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #27 - 08/09/17 at 04:20:36
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 08/09/17 at 03:14:39:
Quote:
It would probably be better to stick to the early e3 in lines with ...e6 or ...d5 and play more actively in the pure West Indian systems.
Since he offers 1.e3 as a possible move order, it's a little late to be recommending something more active against say 1...g6.


Understood.  That was my point when I said that he may be taking the e3 concept a little too far, though readers don't need to.  I'm always happy with a repertoire book if I can use at least 10-20% of the material in it, personally.  Who plays everything that one author in one book says to play?  I'd buy the book if I liked his Meran coverage (which I haven't seen), but I'm skeptical of 6.Bd2, so... I'll wait until I can check it out on a bookshelf somewhere.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #26 - 08/09/17 at 03:14:39
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Quote:
It would probably be better to stick to the early e3 in lines with ...e6 or ...d5 and play more actively in the pure West Indian systems.
Since he offers 1.e3 as a possible move order, it's a little late to be recommending something more active against say 1...g6.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #25 - 08/09/17 at 02:51:19
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It sounds to me like Axel is taking the e3 concept a little too far, after 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7, 4.e3?! is a really tame move.  Playable and perhaps "post-theoretical" like he says, but tame.  It would probably be better to stick to the early e3 in lines with ...e6 or ...d5 and play more actively in the pure West Indian systems.  Naturally there are plenty of good choices; I'm partial to the Smyslov-Petrosian system when I want to play something offbeat with little theory: 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Nf3 0-0 5.Bg5 and 6.e3.  At least the bishop gets outside of the pawn chain, and the pawn on e3 still denies Black use of the d4-square, making him look for alternative sources of counterplay.

Interestingly I see only one game in my database where Smith has played the position after 4.e3 himself, though he may have played this system more times by transposition (and I may not have access to many of his games).  However he did seem to get a very nice game out of the opening; he ended up in a Czech Benoni type setup where Black had a clear extra tempo, but had used that tempo to fianchetto his king's bishop, which is supposed to be worse than developing it to e7 in that sort of "Full Benoni" pawn structure:

  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #24 - 08/08/17 at 21:25:09
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kylemeister wrote on 08/08/17 at 20:12:02:
In the TOC I noticed "Poor Man's Benoni."  I'm guessing that is this kind of thing which Smith has played:  1. e3 g6 2. Nf3 c5 3. d4 Bg7 4. c4 Nf6 5. d5 d6 6. Nc3 O-O 7. Be2 e6 8. O-O ed 9. cd Re8 10. Nd2 Na6 11.e4.  So a Classical Modern Benoni but with White sacrificing a tempo.



The chapters starts via after 1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 g6 3 c4 Bg7 4 e3 c5 5 d5 0-0 6 Nc3 e6 7 Be2 exd5 8 cxd5 d6 9 0-0

Smith writes that one can argue that Benoni is such a bad opening that one would not mind facing it a tempo down. Nakumura has played this line and a very quick e4. However quck look indicates that Smiths idea is to not play e4 at once since is more difficult for black to attack anything if there is no pawn at e4.


  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #23 - 08/08/17 at 20:12:02
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In the TOC I noticed "Poor Man's Benoni."  I'm guessing that is this kind of thing which Smith has played:  1. e3 g6 2. Nf3 c5 3. d4 Bg7 4. c4 Nf6 5. d5 d6 6. Nc3 O-O 7. Be2 e6 8. O-O ed 9. cd Re8 10. Nd2 Na6 11.e4.  So a Classical Modern Benoni but with White sacrificing a tempo.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #22 - 08/08/17 at 17:16:57
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bragesjo wrote on 08/08/17 at 16:03:58:
I have not got time to check lines properly until the weekend however some things are a bit odd.


The approach used by Kramnik when apparently playing the Colle is to follow up with c4 almost immediately. That's always likely to transpose into something else in the QGD, QGD, Panov etc.

Against anything that isn't the Kings Indian or perhaps the Grunfeld, an early e3 is very likely to transpose to a variation known from a different move order.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #21 - 08/08/17 at 16:03:58
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I have not got time to check lines properly until the weekend however some things are a bit odd.

While there are a huge biografy some books are realy missing. Some of Avrukhs book are mentioned but not hes d-pawns special book! Cox has a book mentioned but not hes d-pawns special book!

And a line called Bogo Indian looks like some sort of Queens Gambit declined where black transposes to Bogo Indian Be7 line with d5 already played by black and white has in turn played the suboptimal e3 with a Bishop at d2.

A line I would call Colle with c4 does the book call Queens Indian. It might be a transposing but I don know since I dont play QID but it might a some sort of e3 system. Cox book and Smiths book first appears not to meet at all but it reaches each other after different move orders and follows each other untill move 16.

An other funny thing is that repertour can transpose to Panov attack. I played a Panov tournanamnet recently at ICCF and almost everyone of my games with both sides ended up in a drawish positions and I dont mean computer evaluations. However there might be improvments over the Panov book I used in my white games.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #20 - 08/07/17 at 05:52:16
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testing

This thread "disappeared" -- I was only able to find it by using the search function.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #19 - 08/06/17 at 18:20:43
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RdC wrote on 08/06/17 at 08:49:58:
It's rather more a reversed version of  Kings Indian Attack lines against the French. Those that might go 1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. g3 Nc6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1 b5 9. e5

I don't think he considers the madder version of that system, the reversed version of where Black plays .. b6 and .. Bb7, Qc7 and O-O-O with the idea of advancing the h or g pawns for a Kingside attack.

Before the main lines of the Kings Indian were developed in the 1950s, the idea of an early e3 would be used. The attacking methods for White seen in the Kings Indian Attack were first seen in the Kings Indian for Black. In their day, they caused the e3 approach to be abandoned. Will Axel Smith's advocacy of it cause a revival?


Well, in olden days e4 stuff against the KID was considered just better for White.  That's the picture in e.g. Fine's Practical Chess Openings from 1948, in which I see no mention of this e3 setup.

From what I was aware of, in the reversed version of that KIA vs. French main line, Black may prefer not to go for ...e4.  I recalled an old bit from the first edition of ECO (1978 -- of note, the relevant section was written by Uhlmann):  1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 O-O 5. e3 d6 6. Be2 Nbd7 7. O-O e5 8. b4 Re8 9. a4 ed 10. ed c5 11. Rb1 cb 12. Rxb4 Nb8 13. h3 Nc6 (Spiridonov-Hort, Brno 1975) 14. Rb2 d5 equal according to Hort.  I also recalled Kozomara-R. Byrne (a striking game by Byrne), in which I would have thought that ...e4 was encouraged by White's Bb2.
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #18 - 08/06/17 at 08:49:58
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kylemeister wrote on 07/17/17 at 18:49:42:
I would presume it is that kind of thing.  Incidentally I recall the term "King's Indian Attack Reversed" from an annotation from the 1970s.



It's rather more a reversed version of  Kings Indian Attack lines against the French. Those that might go 1. e4 e6 2. d3 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. Ngf3 Nf6 5. g3 Nc6 6. Bg2 Be7 7. O-O O-O 8. Re1 b5 9. e5

I don't think he considers the madder version of that system, the reversed version of where Black plays .. b6 and .. Bb7, Qc7 and O-O-O with the idea of advancing the h or g pawns for a Kingside attack.

Before the main lines of the Kings Indian were developed in the 1950s, the idea of an early e3 would be used. The attacking methods for White seen in the Kings Indian Attack were first seen in the Kings Indian for Black. In their day, they caused the e3 approach to be abandoned. Will Axel Smith's advocacy of it cause a revival?
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #17 - 08/06/17 at 07:50:35
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I'm pretty excited to see what he has in store for the QGD. That will be the biggest test for the setup since e3 before bringing out the bishop isn't usually good in those structures. You typically want to bring it to f4 or g5 and if not, you play a Catalan (often with b3, Bb2 later). It's weird that these days even with main line openings, I have more difficulties with the QGD than the Slav complex.

I'm also eager to see his handling of the Symmetrical English. I rarely get anything when I face it. It's like a brick wall and I've tried a lot of lines.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #16 - 08/05/17 at 17:08:48
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I wanted to make it clear that despite what I wrote, I like the book.  I just wanted to point out what I believe to be an omission that might require another source if one chooses the Anti-Queen's Gambit option.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #15 - 08/05/17 at 16:14:29
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Strange that after so many years of playing the Meran and Anti-Meran as White, and some as Black, that I have no knowledge of 6.Bd2 at all.
« Last Edit: 08/05/17 at 19:22:51 by ErictheRed »  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #14 - 08/05/17 at 11:23:46
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I ordered the book yesterday. It will arrive early the next week.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #13 - 08/05/17 at 11:20:28
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About club player aspect I was not that clear after all. I did  not meant ultimate mainlines or following them for 20 moves!

I meant  not even entering a  major system where the mainlines starts to spread out.
Since computer era the number of clubplayer games  that entered the startposition of a mainline like for example Najdorf (where white has many mainlines to  choose from) has decreased. I can add that older veteran player are more likely to enter a start position in either  1 d4 or 1 e4 openings. So personally  I am more surprised to reach a startposition of mainline or be in a book position after more than 7 moves when I play black.

I can give  an other example. Vs a 1900 clubplayer I meet  closed Sicilian.  I played 2 .. e6.
He knew how to develop he's pieces but did not know the exact move order so he made a mistake so I got  in a favorable d5 break and  I was slightly better according to computer but the game ended up in a draw. An other example a other club player  played 2  a3 vs sicilian. I played g6 mainline. Opponent starts to think for a very very long time before settling the odd looking 3 c3 and after the game asked how theory goes...
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #12 - 08/05/17 at 04:01:49
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tp2205 wrote on 08/04/17 at 23:51:00:
ErictheRed wrote on 08/01/17 at 22:18:20:
Can anyone say what he recommends vs the Semi-Slav, i.e. in the Meran?  That's the only place where this book overlaps my repertoire I think, but I'd buy the book if I liked his Meran treatment enough.


He suggests 6. Bd2.

So far I could not be happier with the book. It is the introduction into the world of 1 d4/c4/Nf3 I always wanted. Some of things I like are
- move orders/typical plans/pawn structures are explained clearly enough to make this book accessible even to life-long e4-players like me
- no short cuts (unlike some Colle/London repertoire books)
- the amount of variations is manageable
- really quite a few insights of what to aim for => no problems with new/unknown moves

I have looked at many 1 d4 repertoires (e.g. by Schandorff, Watson even Colle or London based repertoires) but they did not work for me. I was looking for a way to broaden my chess horizon without having to memorize many moves (age takes its toll) but in these repertoires there were either too many positions which I did not understand (well enough) or they were too simplistic for my taste. .

I think this is the book to beat for the opening book of the year award.


So he recommends 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 e6 3.e3 Nf6 4.c4 c6 5.Nc3 (in various move orders) 5...Nbd7 6.Bd2 versus the Meran but another recommendation is 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.b3 (Anti-Queen's Gambit) but I can't find any mention of 4...c6.  Of course 5.Nc3 transposes to the systems recommended by Delchev and Kosten and is a good system but it is more theory to learn.  He also has 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e3 e6 4.c4 Be7 5.b3 but in that move order he is careful not to recommend b3 when Black can still play the Meran. 
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #11 - 08/04/17 at 23:51:00
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ErictheRed wrote on 08/01/17 at 22:18:20:
Can anyone say what he recommends vs the Semi-Slav, i.e. in the Meran?  That's the only place where this book overlaps my repertoire I think, but I'd buy the book if I liked his Meran treatment enough.


He suggests 6. Bd2.

So far I could not be happier with the book. It is the introduction into the world of 1 d4/c4/Nf3 I always wanted. Some of things I like are
- move orders/typical plans/pawn structures are explained clearly enough to make this book accessible even to life-long e4-players like me
- no short cuts (unlike some Colle/London repertoire books)
- the amount of variations is manageable
- really quite a few insights of what to aim for => no problems with new/unknown moves

I have looked at many 1 d4 repertoires (e.g. by Schandorff, Watson even Colle or London based repertoires) but they did not work for me. I was looking for a way to broaden my chess horizon without having to memorize many moves (age takes its toll) but in these repertoires there were either too many positions which I did not understand (well enough) or they were too simplistic for my taste. .

I think this is the book to beat for the opening book of the year award.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #10 - 08/04/17 at 21:10:50
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bragesjo wrote on 08/02/17 at 15:21:24:
I only want to make a clarification about my post about "traditional mainlines" and clubplayer aspect. Even if clubplayers dont play "traditional mainlines" clubplayers rarely knows theory on the line that they are playing instead. During the years I have even met FMs who are out of book before move 7 in "traditional mainlines".  I can also add that younger players rarely knows theory on old fashioned lines not popular by todays elite players.


This is why I think the whole "too much theory" argument is rarely applicable outside of 2000+. First of all, people play sidelines all the time in openings that start mainline. They do this to avoid diverse theory for things like the Sicilian or Grunfeld and these lines tend to be more positional in their nature so you can play well if you understand the position. Secondly, even if I know only 10 moves of Najdorf theory, my opponents generally also know only about that much. Just because there is a lot of theory on a line and a lot of computer analysis can be done doesn't mean it actually has until you get to really high levels. Plus, natural moves are often good enough even if not optimal and the better player in that position will still triumph most times.

My interest in side lines isn't to avoid theory because I'm scared of how much there is to learn and what my opponent could know. It's just to make myself a complete player and to surprise people a bit.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #9 - 08/02/17 at 15:21:24
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I only want to make a clarification about my post about "traditional mainlines" and clubplayer aspect. Even if clubplayers dont play "traditional mainlines" clubplayers rarely knows theory on the line that they are playing instead. During the years I have even met FMs who are out of book before move 7 in "traditional mainlines".  I can also add that younger players rarely knows theory on old fashioned lines not popular by todays elite players.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #8 - 08/01/17 at 22:18:20
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Can anyone say what he recommends vs the Semi-Slav, i.e. in the Meran?  That's the only place where this book overlaps my repertoire I think, but I'd buy the book if I liked his Meran treatment enough.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #7 - 08/01/17 at 14:16:04
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I did not read this book, but I have read Axel Smith's book in the past and it was probably the best chess book I have ever read
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #6 - 07/30/17 at 11:31:37
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I have read the excerpt from website. I might buy this book, It is an interesting concept.

However one thing is not mentioned is clubplayer aspect.There are more books, disc, databases etc than ever before.
But clubplayers knows less and less theory. So I am more surprised when meeting a  "traditional mainline".

At clublevel d-pawn specials is more common that "traditional mainlines" after 1 d4. And even if they play "traditional mainlines" they does not theory very far. At Internet I have lost count on how many times I meet 4 Bd2 vs Nimzo.

The same principle applies to 1 e4 openings as well.
Open Sicilian is a "traditional mainline". In practical play about 90 % of all club players plays some anti sicilian instead.
So at club level one can almost get away by only learning anti sicilians!
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #5 - 07/27/17 at 18:03:11
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Now the book is available at Forward Chess!
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #4 - 07/17/17 at 18:49:42
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I would presume it is that kind of thing.  Incidentally I recall the term "King's Indian Attack Reversed" from an annotation from the 1970s.
  
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #3 - 07/17/17 at 18:32:38
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I've seen players try this idea before. You really can play this way against everything including the king's indian and get a playable position. I noticed that in the Indian defence section he has a section called "Reversed King's Indian Attack" and I wonder if he'll be trying something like this game between Grishuk and Caruana. This game is what introduced me to the idea of playing something like this:

  
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grandpatzer
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #2 - 07/13/17 at 07:59:03
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It looks like a very original book indeed!
  
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ErictheRed
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Re: "e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
Reply #1 - 07/13/17 at 05:52:59
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The excerpt looks good. I wonder what he covers vs the Meran?
  
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kylemeister
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"e3 Poison" by Axel Smith
07/12/17 at 19:15:04
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(now with a preview)
http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/products/1/295/e3_poison_by_axel_smith/

One thing I was a bit struck by:  the full game in Chapter 1 involves a known tricky line of the 4. e3 QID (plus, reaching it by a move order starting with d4, Nf3 and e3 has happened many times).  Doesn't exactly seem "post-theoretical" as the chapter title has it.
  
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