Latest Updates:
Normal Topic CPU for chess analisys (Read 463 times)
Glenn Snow
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 1640
Location: Franklin
Joined: 09/27/03
Gender: Male
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #9 - 09/07/17 at 00:53:11
Post Tools
proustiskeen wrote on 08/21/17 at 14:24:10:
TN wrote on 08/21/17 at 08:49:49:
As far as I know, the Ryzen is cheaper but not as reliable (including for gaming, though it was't the initial question). I heard that Intel recently reduced their prices as a result, though, so I'd say that the difference in performance would be worth the investment, but as always you should do your own research.


For chess engines, Ryzen blows Intel out of the water. Having more cores per $ spent is important, but just as important is the fact that Ryzen's version of SMT (Infinity Fabric) is more efficient than Intel's hyperthreading, making full use of all threads a net plus with most engines.


http://en.chessbase.com/post/amd-releases-new-ryzen-processor

The chessbase link for 3/2017 supports what you're saying and if I'd know this I might have bought a computer with the Ryzen CPU instead of one with i7-7700k (which is still much better than the last computer I had).
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
proustiskeen
God Member
*****
Offline


Hello from Omaha!

Posts: 554
Joined: 08/11/08
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #8 - 09/06/17 at 16:20:48
Post Tools
It will be hard to use Houdini on Amazon EC2 as there is copy protection involved in the install.

I've used Komodo and Stockfish on EC2 under Windows installs. Very easy. Just drag your Chessbase 12/13/14 install file over, don't register it, and set up your engine in the Engine Cloud on the EC2 instance. Very efficient way to get huge iron if / when you need it.

That said, I haven't done this since I got the Ryzen7 1700.
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
daniel7472
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 4
Joined: 08/19/17
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #7 - 09/06/17 at 06:47:07
Post Tools
Thank you for bringing that up. It is an option, of course, and in Houdini, that I bought, you can make use of these cloud engines free or paid but I still prefer to have my own hardware. It is not a big deal since I am not a pro but just wondering where to put my money, that's all. If ryzen7 1700 is a better buy than ryzen5 1600, chess wise, that's my only question.
An interesting topic is also the hyperthreading thing; I searched a bit about that and it seems, from my findings at least, that it still doesn't help much.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
gillbod
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 42
Joined: 03/26/13
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #6 - 09/05/17 at 20:52:28
Post Tools
It is possible to run a chess engine on Amazon EC2 instances in the cloud. Naturally, you would have to pay for this. But it does make the choice of buying computers much simpler, and paying per hour is much cheaper overall than paying for a beefy computer!

If there's enough interest I can elaborate on how it's done. It's not too complicated.

Brief overview:

1) On Mac and Linux (not sure about Windows) UCI engines talk to GUIs via standard streams. This means that to spoof a remote engine to look like a local one, all you need to do is write a script that connects and launches the remote engine. Hand this script to your chess GUI, and it will be none the wiser that the engine is actually running elsewhere.

2) Cloud based CPUs don't necessarily all live on the same hardware. This extra latency can hurt chess programs (although I haven't investigated to what degree). You can provision all your cores to be on the same hardware on AWS, but not in most other cloud providers. This costs a bit extra.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
daniel7472
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 4
Joined: 08/19/17
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #5 - 08/21/17 at 17:04:44
Post Tools
This is news ... I thought that for chess engines it is not recommended hyper threading. So it has changed ...
Nice to know. In any case I am still waiting for some serious prove to go with R7.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
proustiskeen
God Member
*****
Offline


Hello from Omaha!

Posts: 554
Joined: 08/11/08
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #4 - 08/21/17 at 14:24:10
Post Tools
TN wrote on 08/21/17 at 08:49:49:
As far as I know, the Ryzen is cheaper but not as reliable (including for gaming, though it was't the initial question). I heard that Intel recently reduced their prices as a result, though, so I'd say that the difference in performance would be worth the investment, but as always you should do your own research.


For chess engines, Ryzen blows Intel out of the water. Having more cores per $ spent is important, but just as important is the fact that Ryzen's version of SMT (Infinity Fabric) is more efficient than Intel's hyperthreading, making full use of all threads a net plus with most engines.
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
proustiskeen
God Member
*****
Offline


Hello from Omaha!

Posts: 554
Joined: 08/11/08
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #3 - 08/21/17 at 14:21:23
Post Tools
Get the R7 if you can afford it. The two extra cores / four extra threads make a pretty big difference long-term, especially if you want to run two engines simultaneously to get different 'opinions.'
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
daniel7472
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 4
Joined: 08/19/17
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #2 - 08/21/17 at 11:32:52
Post Tools
Thanks for the tip. Regarding the search, I did that but couldn't find anything relevant. I guess I'll stick with R5 1600 since I still don't understand the benefit of making the effort. Sure, R7 will be better but I couldn't find any strong argument in favor of R7, so I can make the effort. If the difference in analyzing a position is just a couple of minutes ... well its not worth it, for me. If the difference would be I get different evaluation ... then yes, that would worth it.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
TN
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 3379
Joined: 11/07/08
Gender: Male
Re: CPU for chess analisys
Reply #1 - 08/21/17 at 08:49:49
Post Tools
As far as I know, the Ryzen is cheaper but not as reliable (including for gaming, though it was't the initial question). I heard that Intel recently reduced their prices as a result, though, so I'd say that the difference in performance would be worth the investment, but as always you should do your own research.
  

All our dreams come true if we have the courage to pursue them.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
daniel7472
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 4
Joined: 08/19/17
CPU for chess analisys
08/20/17 at 20:23:28
Post Tools
I am about to buy a new PC and I am torn between Ryzen 1600 and Ryzen 1700. Except chess I work with Autocad (MEP, Electrical, Revit) do some casual gaming (company of heroes) and light programming. What will you suggest, considering cash is important. If the difference in performance justify the money, I will do the effort, otherwise not.
The rest of the system:
16GB DDR4 3200mhz
256gb SSD
Radeon R9 380

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bookmarks: del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Google+ Linked in reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Yahoo