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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) What to play against the benoni? (Read 2746 times)
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #31 - 11/06/18 at 02:55:16
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@ReneDescartes, your moves are very logical and I would be happy to play that way as black, but the game is not over. 1. d4 c5 2. b4 cxd4 3. Nf3 e5 4. Nxe5 Bxb4+ 5. c3 dxc3 6. Qb3 Qe7 Stockfish suggests 7. a3 is -0.8. White is getting one pawn back and has some slight compensation for the remaining pawn minus.
Edited:
I should clarify my thinking here. Indeed the game may not be over, in the sense that certainly I could not win this against Stockfish, and there's a fair chance I might not win it against an evenly matched human. But the analysis is over, in the sense that even if said human held the white position, they would be daft to repeat the line knowing that the same position would be reached.

@kylemeister, I also saw that quote, which seemed a little ironic to me, considering some of the drek Schiller advocated in Gambit Opening Repertoire for White. Of course 2. b4 is bad, but in a way it is also good, because it is not as bad as it looks at first glance. I pushed the pieces around a bit, thinking "there must be some simple refutation", but it was not too easy. And some players become completely unhinged when their opponent seems to be "getting away with" a bad move. Don't forget the etymology of "gambit".
Edited:
The funny thing about 2.b4?! is that it is the second-worst move in the position, after 2.Bh6??, and yet 2.b4 might not lose by force. I could go into a long spiel about why gambits work, or a different spiel about why they don't, but I suspect many here know it all already. In the end it is the moves that convince.
« Last Edit: 11/06/18 at 03:59:04 by an ordinary chessplayer » 
Reason: Clarification. 
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #30 - 11/06/18 at 00:18:51
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"But such a fluke event can't justify White's silly opening." -- Watson and Schiller (Taming Wild Chess Openings) on Zilbermints-Neplokh
  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #29 - 11/05/18 at 23:01:00
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In this "gambit," White gives himself, not his opponent, development problems, a central inferiority, or both.

1.d4 c5 2.b4 cxd4 3.Nf3 e5. Now the stated 4.a3 grants Black a big central preponderance. Black can just develop and support the d-pawn with 4...Nc6: White won't be able to dislodge the knight with b5 because of ...Qa5+ and Qxb4. If White now develops according to his evident plan with 5.Bb2, Black plays 5...d5 with a monstrous center. White can reduce it to a merely ideal center with ...c3 or ...e3, but then Black develops very smoothly with ...Nf6, ..Be6 and ...Bd6 in some order, and White isn't even ahead in development for his center pawn!

More sane is capturing the e-pawn with 4.Nxe5 Bxb4+, but then by responding to the check White gives himself terrible problems developing. 5.Nd2 planning to fianchetto doesn't work because  5...Nf6 6. Bb2 Ne4 (the big issue) and 7.Nf3 (forced) is met by Qf6! when the Nf3 is overloaded.

On the other hand, after 5.Bd2 Bc5, how is White going to develop his queen's knight? 6.Nd3 Bb6 (or 6...d6 straightening out the pawn structure) and again ...Nf6 followed by ...Ne4, Nxd2 and ...Ba5 is a dominant threat.

So after 4.Nxe5 Bxb4+, White has to block with 5.c3 dxc3. White can't play Nxc3 to gain time. He can try 5.Qb3 to support Nxc3, but 5...Qe7 defends the bishop and forces White's knight back, losing any time he will gain. Again, White be ahead neither in development nor in the center.

These long lines from rapid games between non-masters are useless after move 4, 5, or 6. But I like the way Gambit managed to slip the words "Zilbermints Benoni" into Chessbase by naming a tournament that.
« Last Edit: 11/06/18 at 10:48:03 by ReneDescartes »  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #28 - 11/03/18 at 00:30:04
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Mtal wrote on 11/01/18 at 20:49:49:
[quote author=1D3B3738332E5A0 link=1531022829/24#24 date=1535784547]The Zilbermints Benoni: 1 d4 c5 2 b4!
Part One:  Its Origin  and  2...cxb4 3 a3
       

The Benoni Defense is a solid opening with a well-established reputation that attracts players of all classes. It can be equally suitable for positional and tactical play, and has been used  by such players as Fischer, Karpov, and other leading grandmasters.  From a White point of view, the Benoni Defense is a way to avoid the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit and to chicken out into closed positions.


A personal remark. This made me laugh and happy for more than a minute. So thank you for that. Chaqu'un à son goût. This has to be translated that everyone has the right to find its own way to hell.

One question: Ij you want to take the content following after such a remark taken seriously, why don't you hide it. Is it a sign for a secret religious circle? You could surely choose something better.
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #27 - 11/01/18 at 20:49:49
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Gambit wrote on 09/01/18 at 07:49:07:
The Zilbermints Benoni: 1 d4 c5 2 b4!
Part One:  Its Origin  and  2...cxb4 3 a3
       

The Benoni Defense is a solid opening with a well-established reputation that attracts players of all classes. It can be equally suitable for positional and tactical play, and has been used  by such players as Fischer, Karpov, and other leading grandmasters.  From a White point of view, the Benoni Defense is a way to avoid the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit and to chicken out into closed positions.  The question is, how do you stop that?  How to force Black into unfamiliar territory? Sure, there is the Sicilian, 2 e4, but that has been investigated back and forth, so unless you feel like memorizing 30-odd moves worth of Grandmaster analysis, don’t bother.  Taking that into consideration, what is White to do?

        On 19 February 1995, while having a break between rounds at the United States Amateur Team East, I invented the Zilbermints Benoni.  The very next day, I beat an old antagonist with it in a blitz match.  Here is that historic first game:

Zilbermints- Ralph Neplokh (1820)
    1 d4 c5 2 b4! cb4 3 a3 Qa5 4 Qd2 Nc6 5 Bb2 e6 6 ab Bxb4+7 c3! and White won a piece and game.

Please note that the main difference between my opening and the Sicilian Defense is the e-pawn.

In the Sicilian, it is on e4; here it either stays on its original square or goes to e3, protecting f2.

This gives the line independent significance.  Also, as the reader will see later on, it is possible to  even gambit the e-pawn, getting piece development and pressure as compensation.

        After 1 d4 c5 2 b4!  Black has three possible answers. They are:
A) 2...cxb4 3 a3, which may or may not transpose to the Sicilian Wing Gambit;
B) 2...cxd4 3 Nf3 which transposes either into the Zilbermints Benoni or the Smith-Morra Gambit (or 1 Nf3 c5 2 d4 cxd4 3 b4!);
C) other moves.

                A) 2...cxb4 3 a3

        A1) 3...e6 4 ab4 Bxb4 5 c3 Be7 6 Bf4 Nf6 7 e3 d6 8 Bd3 b6 9 Nf3 Bb7 10 00 Nbd7 11 Na3 a6 12 Qb3 00 13 Nc4 Qc7 14 Bg3 Bd5 15 e4 Nxe4 16 Bxe4 Bxe4 17 Ncd2 Bb7 18 c4 Nf6 19 Rfb1 Nd7 20 h4 Rab8 21 Qd3 Bc6? 22 Rxa6 Qb7 23 Raa1 Ra8 24 Rxa8 25 c5 dc 26 Nc4
and White eventually won, Zilbermints-Neil Cohen (1872 Quick Chess), Marshall Chess Club Blitz Tournament, 10/6/1995.

        A2) 3...d5 4 ab4 Bf5 5 c3 e6 6 Bf4 Bd6 7 e3 Bxf4 8 ef4 Qc7 9 Qd2 Nf6 10 f3 Nbd7 11 Na3 00 Here White blundered with 12 g4?? Nxg4! and lost in 21 moves, Zilbermints-Ylan Schwartz (2398), U.S. Amateur Team East, 1997. However, 12 Bd3! still keeps the game alive.

        A3) 3...ba3 4 g3  Sort of like a reversed Benko Gambit, with the main difference being the d-pawn. 4...e6 5 Bg2 Nf6 6 Nxa3 Qa5+ 7 Bd2 Bb4 8 Nc4 Bxd2+ 9 Nxd2 Qc3  10 e3 Nc6 11 Ne2 Qb2 12 Rb1 Qa3 13 Nc4 Qe7 14 00 d5 15 Nd2 00 16 c4 b6 17 Nc3 Rd8 18 Qb3 Na5 19 Qa2 Ba6 20 Nb5 Bxb5 21 Rxb5 Rac8 22 c5 Nc4 23 Nxc4  dc4 24 Qxc4 Nd5 25 Bxd5 exd5 26 Qb4 h5 27 cb6 Qxb4 28 Rxb4 ab6 29 Rxb6 Rc2 30 Rfb1 Kh7 31 Kg2 g5 32 Rb7 Kg6 33 R7b5 g4 34 R5b2 Rc4? 35 Ra1 Kf4 36 Rb7 f6 37 Rb6 Rc2 38 Raa6 Rf8 39 Rd6 Rb8 40  Rxf6+ Ke3 41 Ra3, Black resigns, Zilbermints-Raphael D’Lugoff, 4 Rated Games Tonight! Tournament, Marshall Chess Club, New York 11/7/1996.

        A4) 3...g6 4 ab4 e5 5 c3 Bg7 6 d5 d6 7 Be3 Ne7 8 g3 Bd7 9 Bg2 a6 10 Na3 Nf5 11 Bd2 00 12 e4 Ne7 13 Nc4 Bb5 14 Na3 Bd7 15 h4 h5 16 Bh3 f5 17 f3 fxe4 18 fxe4 Qb6 19 Qe2 Bxh3 20 Nxh3 Nd7 21 Nf2 Rf7 22 00 R8f8 23 Kg2 Nf6 24 Nc4 Qc7 25 Ne3 Qd7 26 c4 Qc8 27 Rac1 b6 28 c5! bc5 29 bc5 dc5 30 Nc4 Ne8 31 Nd3 Qc7 32 Ba5 Qb8 33 Nxc5 Rxf1 34 Rxf1 Rxf1 35 Qxf1 Qb5 36 Ne6 Nxd5 37 Nxg7 Qxc4?? 35 Qxc4!, Black resigns, Zilbermints- Ernesto Labate, Westfield (NJ) Grand Prix, 12/13/1998.

        A5) 3...e6 4 ab Bxb4+ 5 c3 Be7 6 e4 transposes to the Sicilian Wing Gambit. This line, which is regarded as good for White by Thomas Kapitaniak in his 1985 book, Sicilian Defense: Wing Gambits can become very dangerous against an unwary opponent. The game Zilbermints-Brian McCarthy (2391), New Jersey Open 1997, 8/31/97, continued 6...d6 7 f4 Nf6 8 Bd3 a6 9 Nf3 h6 10 00 Nc6 11 h3 d5 12 e5 Ne4 13 Bxe4 dxe4 14 Nd2 Nxd4 The first of four cheapos by Black. 15 Nxe4! Nf5 16 Qxd8 Bxd8 17 g4 Nh4 18 Nd6+! Kf8 19 Ba3 Kg8 20 Kh2 Bc7 21 Nd2 Ng6 22 Nd2-e4 White has full compensation plus extra for the pawn. 22...Bd7 23 Nc5  Bc6 24 Ncb7! Bxb7 25 Nxb7 Nxf4!? The second Black cheapo. 26 Bd6!  Nd5 27 c4! Ne3 28 Rf3!  Nc2 29 Rd1 Bb6 30 c5!  Ba7 31 Rdf1 h5 The third Black cheapo, trying to open up the file before my attack crashes through. 32 g5! Nd4 33 Rxf7 Nf5 The last cheapo, which is demolished by a sacrifice. 34 R7xf5! ef5 35 Rxf5 g6 36 Rf6 Kg7 37 e6 Bb8 38 Rf7+ Kg8 39 Rf8+ 40 Rf7+ Kg8 41 Kg2! a5 42 Rf8 Kg7 43 Rxh8! Kxh8 44 e7! Ba7 45 Nd8! h4 46 e8/Q Kh7 47 Qf7+, Black resigns.

      Based on the above games, I would say that White gets good compensation in the 2...cxb4  lines.  For those of you who like flank openings, the Zilbermints Benoni can transpose into variations of the Smith-Morra Gambit, the Sicilian Wing Gambit, the Orangutan/Sokolsky, the French Wing Gambit, or into independent lines.  The reason why I am the only player who uses this  line is because the absolute majority of players, including Sokolsky fans, do not realize the tactical dynamics of this opening.  The games I present here are the only theory on this opening, which is not in most chess books.  Eric Schiller in his huge Unorthodox Chess Openings (1998) calls it  the Nakamura Gambit.  This is incorrect.  When I contacted Clyde Nakamura of Hawaii by e-mail  in December 1998,  he had this to say about Schiller’s placeholder (as it turned out) name:

                “Sorry to disappoint you but I could not find any games with moves 1 d4 c5 2 b4.  The name Nakamura Gambit is a name invented by Eric Schiller.  I have not named any opening after  my own name. In Schiller’s book on Unorthodox Openings (Edition 2) he has the Nakamura Gambit  listed, but this is based on the game   [ a Sicilian Wing Gambit— LDZ ] that I played before at the Hawaii International #4 in a round  2 game against IM Andrianov from Greece. ...

                I believe your name “Zilbermints Benoni” should be the name for the opening 1 d4 c5 2 b4 since I had no part in either the invention or the development of this opening.” [emphasis  mine — LDZ]

                So much for Schiller’s placeholder name!  His analysis is extremely superficial, to say the  least.  Schiller only gives   2...cxb4 3 e4 g6  3...d5; 4 e5 e6 transposes to the Wing Gambit in the French Defense (Schiller, 1998) 4 Nf3 Bg7 5 Bb2 d6 and  I don’t see much compensation for White”  - Schiller.  This is all well and good, but as Nakamura himself notes, this analysis is based on the game Nakamura-Andrianov, by a different order of moves.  That’s  first. Secondly, and more important, White does not have to play 3 e4 to begin with!  The right move, as I convincingly showed above, is 3 a3!

                Now, for some more history.  On the assumption that 1 b4 c5 was very similar to my opening, I researched thousands of 1 b4 c5 games on the Internet computer database, which has two million-plus games.  Sure enough, the computer came up with seven games that transposed into the Zilbermints Benoni.  The two games shown below belong, by classification of analysis, to C) 2... other moves, which will be covered in the upcoming  Part Three of my article.  Because of their historical interest, however, I include them here, out of  sequence.

                1 b4 c5 2 bxc5 e6 3 d4 b6?!  4 cxb6 Qxb6 This position can  also arise from 1 d4 c5 2 b4!  e6 3 bc5 b6?! 4 cxb6 Qxb6 5 e4 Nf6 6 f3 Nc6 7 Be3 Qb2 8 Nd2 Nxd4 9 Bd3 Bc5 10 Kf2 00 11 Nc4 Qb5 12 Rb1 Qa4 13 c3 Qxd1 14 Rxd1 d5 15 Ne5, Black resigns, E.Olej-B.Nemeskal, Hungary 1964.

      1 b4 c5 2 bc5 e5 3 d4! exd4 4 Ba3 Bxc5 Here we once again see a transposition of moves.  In this case, however, the proper move order is 1 d4 c5 2 b4 e5!? 3 bxc5 exd4 4 Ba3 Bxc5.  5 Bxc5 Qa5+ 6 c3 dxc3??  Schiller, who included this game in his Unorthodox Chess Openings, notes that after 6...Qxc5 7 cxd4 Qb4+ 8 Qd2 Qxd2+ (8...Nc6!?) 9 Nxd2 Nc6 10 e3 and White is just a tiny  bit better.  I agree with him there.  7 Qd6 c2+ 8 Nd2!  Black resigns, Ritter-Tuchtenhagen, Postal, Germany 1988.

      In my next article I will cover 2...cxd4 3 Nf3 which is by far the most common move, with fourteen games played.  In that line, my record stands at +10, -3, =1.

      Till next time.

                   

Wow thanks Gambit for the info. You are right otb this can be challenging. I will take a look at it. I actually have not checked this tread on a while, glad I did.
  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #26 - 09/01/18 at 07:57:34
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B6) 3...g6?  This move pretty much lets White develop as he pleases. In some respects, it weakens the a1-g8 diagonal and the f6 and h6 squares, since the Bg7 is opposed by the Bb2 in this line.The game continued 4 Qxd4 Nf6 5 Bb2 Bg7 6 Qd1 00 7 e3 d6 8 a3 Bf5 9 Bd3 Qd7 10 00 h5 11 Nd4 Bxd3 12 cxd3 Nc6 13 Nxc6 bc 14 Nd2 d5?  15 Nf3 Rac8 16 Bxf6 Bxf6 17 d4 Rfe8 18 Ne5!  Bxe5 19 dxe5 e6 20 Qd4 Qb7 21 Rfd1 Re7 22 Rac1 Qb6 23 Rc5 R7c7 24 R1c1 Qb7 25 Qc3 a6 26 h3 Kg7 27 a4 Rb8 28 b5 ab 29 ab Qb6 30 Rxb6 Rxb6 31 bc6 Rc8 32 c7 Qb7 33 Qc5 Kg8 34 Qd6 Kg7 35 Kh2 Re8??  36 Qd8! Qc8 37 Qxe8!, Black resigns, Zilbermints- NM Ilan Kreitner (2200) Marshall Chess Club Game/30, New York, 5/24/1999.

Another game continued 4 Qxd4 Nf6 5 Bb2 Bg7 6 Qh4!?  Qb6 7 a3 00 8 Ng5 h6 9 Nf3 g5?!  10 Nxg5!?  hg5 11 Qxg5 d5 12 h4 d4 13 h5 Nh7 14 Qg3 Kh8 15 h6 Bf6 16 e3 e5 17 ed ed 18 c3 Re8+ 19 Kd1 Qe6 20 Bd3 Qg4+ 21 Kc1 Qxg3 22 fg3 dc 23 Nxc3 Bg5 24 Ne4+ f6 25 Nxg5 Nxg5 26 Bxf6 Kg8 27 h7+, Black resigns, Zilbermints-Irving Prus, Marshall Chess Club Friday Rapids, New York, 12/1/1995.
  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #25 - 09/01/18 at 07:51:33
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Part Two : 2...cxd4 3 Nf3
or 1 Nf3 c5 2 d4 cxd4 3 b4!


In Part One of my article I showed how the student of the unorthodox can gain the advantage with 1 d4 c5 2 b4!  against the Benoni Defense.  The psychological value of this line alone gives White good chances, for Black usually is flabbergasted by such an unexpected response.  Now we  will take a look at the 2...cxd4 3 Nf3 line, which I consider the main line here.
Another move order is: 1 Nf3 c5 2 d4 cxd4 3 b4!



After 2...cxd4 3 Nf3   (diagram) Black has tried B1) 3...e5; B2) 3...e6; B3) 3...d5; B4) 3...Nc6; B5) 3...Nf6; B6) 3...g6



B1) 3...e5 is an attempt to transpose to lines similar to the Sicilian Wing Gambit (1 e4 c5 2 b4 cxb4 3 a3 e5), where Black may have some chances.  However, as I stated in the previous article, the main difference between my opening and the Sicilian Wing Gambit is that the  e-pawn is still on its original square. This gives my opening independent significance.  The crazy game Zilbermints- NM Jerry Simon (2240), Marshall Chess Club G/60 Tournament, 7/2/1995, continued 4 a3 d6 5 e3 Be7 6 ed4 e4 7 Nfd2 Nf6 8 d5? 00 9 c4 a5 10 Bb2 ab 11 ab Rxa1 12 Bxa1 Na6 13 Bc3 Qb6 14 b5 Nc5 15 Be2 Bf5 16 Nb3 Nxb3 17 Qxb3 e3 18 f3 Nd7 19 00 Re8 20 Rd1 Nc5 21 Bd4 Bf6  22 Bxc5 Qxc5 23 Nc3 h5 24 Na4 Qa7 25 Nb2? Ra8 26 Re1 Qa2 27 Qxa2 Rxa2 28 Nd1 Bd4 29 g3 Rc2 30 Kf1 Bh3+ 31 Kg1 Bc5 32 Kh1 Rc1 33 g4 hg4 34 fg Bb4 35 Rg1 Rc2 36 Bf1! Bxf1 37 Nxe3! Bxc4! 38 Rb1 Bc5 39 Nxc4 Rxc4 40 h3 Rd4 41 Re1 b6 42 Kg2 Rxd5 43 Kf3 Re5 44 Rd1 Kf8 45 Ra1 Ke7 46 Ra7 Ke6 47 Ra8 Kd5 48 Rf8 Re7 49 h4 Kc4 50 g5 d5 51 h5 d4 52 h6 gh6 53 gh6 54 h7 Bd4 55 Rd8  Re3+ 56 Kg2 Re2+ 57 Kh1 d2 58 Rd4 Kxd4 59 h8/Q Kc5, Black overstepped the time limit. 1-0.



B2) 3...e6 is similar to B1) but is just a little bit more conservative, since Black does not try to grab the center outright.  Three examples:



B21)   3...e6 4 a3 a5 5 b5 d5



The position is probably equal to slightly better for White.

6 Bb2 Nf6 7 Bxd4 Be7 8 Nc3 Nbd7 9 Na4 00 10 e3 Bd6 11 Bb2 e5  12 Nc3 e4 13 Nd4 Ne5 14 Be2 h6 15 Qd2 a4 16 h3 Bd7 17 g4 Qc8 18 Rg1 Nc4 19 Bxc4 Qxc4 20 000 Rfc8 21 Nf5! White counter-attacks on the Kingside Bf8 22 g5! hg 23 Rxg5 g6 24  Rdg1 Kh7 25 Nb1 Bxf5 26 Bxf6 Bh6 27 h4! Giving up the Rook for the excellent Bf6 27... Qxb5  28 Nc3 Qc5 29 h5! Qxa3+ 30 Kd1 Bxg5 31 Rxg5!  Qd6 32 hg6 Bxg6?? 32... fg! is a permanent block. 33 Bxe5 Qe7 34 f4  Qf8 35 Nxd5 Rd8 36 Bd4 Rxd5 37 Rxd5 Qh6 38 Qg2 a3 39 f5 Bh5+ 40  Kd2 Rg8 41 Qxe4, Black overstepped the time limit, Zilbermints -Igor Dayen (2152), Marshall CC U2300 Tournament, 7/9/1995.



B212) 3...e6 4 a3 a5 5 b5 Nf6 (diagram) was seen in the game Zilbermints- NM Boris Privman (2307), 4 Rated Games Tonight!, Marshall Chess Club, New York, 12/10/1996.  That game continued 6 Qxd4 b6 7 e3 Bb7 8 Be2 Bc5 9 Qh4 Be7 10 Qd4 d6 11 00 Nbd7 12 c4 Rc8 13 Bb2 00 14 Qd1 Nc5 15 Nbd2 a4 16 Bd4 Ra8 17 Bxc5 dc5 18 Qc2 Here Privman touched his Bb7 and had to move it.  Bxf3 19 Bxf3 Ra7 20 Nb1 Nd7 21 Nc3 Bf6 22 Rad1 Qc7 23 Ne4 Ne5 24 Be2 Be7 25 f4 Nd7 26 Bd3 f5 27 Ng3 Bf6 28 Ne2 g6 29 e4 fxe4 30 Bxe4 Bg7 31 Qd3 Nf6 32 Bc6 Qe7 Here I blundered by playing 33 Ng3?? too early.  I should have played first 33 h3!  and only  then 34 Ng3.  Now Privman gets positional garbage.  33...Ng4! 34 Ne4 Bd4+ 35 Kh1 Ne3 36 Rde1 Nxf1 37 Rxf1 Kg7 38 Qh3 h6 39 Ng3 e5 40 f5 Qg5 41 Ne4 Rxf5 42 g4 Rxf1 43 Qxf1 Qxg4 44 Qf6+ Kh7 45 Qf1 Qf5 46 Qe2 Rf7 47 Kg2 Qf4 48 Bc4 Rf5 49 Be6 Rh5 50 h3 Rh4 51 Ng3 e4 52 Bd5 Be5 53 Qe1 Qf3 54 Kh2. The rest is unrecorded due to mutual time pressure.  Eventually 0-1.  The interesting thing is that from this point on, whenever we played, Privman never again played 1...c5 against me, preferring the chicken 1...d6 .  Obviously I must have scared him with my Zilbermints Benoni.



B213) 3...e6 4 a3 a5 5 b5 Bc5 (diagram) Black is trying to develop his Bishop and grab space at the same time.  Play resembles something out of the Orangutan (1 b4 c5 2 b5). The game continued 6 Nxd4 Qf6 7 c3 e5 8 Nf3 h6 9 Qd5 d6 10 e3 Ne7 11 Qd1 Bg4 12 Be2 Nd7 13 h3 Bh5? Oops.  Now comes the cheapo!  14 Nxe5! Bxe2 15 Nxd7 Kxd7 16 Qxe2 Rae8 17 Bb2 Qg6 18 00? This is a mistake, because 18 Qg4!  would have swapped Queens and left White with an extra pawn. Now Black tries to get counter-chances. 18...Nf5 19 Bc1 Kkc7 20 a4 Re5 21 Na3 Rhe8 22 Nc4 Re4 23 Ba3 Nh4 24 g3 Qe6 25 Kh2 Rxc4 26 Bxc5 dc5 27 gh4 Rxh4 28 Qf3 g5 29 Rg1 Kc8 30 Rad1 f5 31 Qd5 Qe5+ 32 Qxe5 Rxe5 33 Rd6 Ra4 34 Rh6 Rxa2 35 Kg3 a4 36 Kf3 g4 37 hg4 a3 38 Rh7!  Rd2 39 gf5 Re8 40 Rgg7! a2 41 Ra7 Kb8 42 b6 Rg8 43 Rhb7+, Black resigns, Zilbermints- Thomas  A.  Polese (1903/Quick Chess), Westfield (NJ) G/20 Tournament, 8/29/1999.



B22) 3...e6 4 a3 Qb6 is an attempt by Black to try  something on the Queenside.  The game Zilbermints-Schreiber (1945/Quick Chess), Marshall Chess Club G/10 Tournament, 10/4/1996, continued 5 Nxd4 Nc6 6 Bb2 Nf6 7 e3 d5 8 Bb5 Bd7 9 Be2 Nxd4 10 Bxd4 Qd8 11 00 Be7 12 Nd2 00 13 Nf3 Bd6 14 Ne5 Ba4 15 f3 Nd7 16 Nxd7 Qxd7 17 f4 Rfe8 18 Bf3 Rac8 19 Rc1 b6 20 g3 e5 21 Bb2 e4 22 Bg2 Bb5 23 Rf2 Bc4 24 Qd4 f6 25 Bf1 b5 26 Bxc4 bxc4? 27 Qxd5+  Qe6 28 Qxe6 Rxe6 29 Bd4 Bb8 30 c3 Ra6 31 Ra1 Ra4 32 Kg2 Bd6 33 R2a2 Rb8 34 Kf2 a5 35 Ke2 ab 36 ab Rxa2 37 Rxa2 The rest is unrecorded due to mutual time scramble.  Eventually 1-0.

B23) 3...e6 4 a3 Nf6 (diagram) This is pretty conservative play.  Black is adopting a wait-and-see attitude.  White has nothing to fear, so long as he plays accurately.  The game Zilbermints-NM Brian McCarthy (2285), Westfield (NJ) Grand Prix, 1/18/1999, continued 5 Bb2 Be7 6 Bxd4 b6 7 e3 Bb7 8 Nbd2 00 9 Bd3 d6 10 Bb2 Nbd7 11 00 a6 12 Re1 d5 13 Ne5 Nxe5 14 Bxe5 Nd7 15 Bb2 Bf6 16 Bxf6 Qxf6 17 Qf3 Qxf3 18 gf3 Maybe 18 Nxf3 is better. g6 19 f4 Rfd8 20 Kf1 Rac8 21 Ke2 Nf6 22 f3? Better is 22 Nf3 22...d4 23 e4 Nh4 24 f5 Nf4+ 25 Kf2 Rc3 26 Nc4 Rxd3 27 cd3 Nxd3+ 28 Ke2 Nxe1 29 Rxe1 ef5 30 e5 b5 31 Nd6 Bd5 32 Rc1 f6 33 f4 g5 34 Kd3 fg 35 Kxd4 Be4 36 Rf1 f3 37 Ke3 fe 38 Nxe5 fxe5 39 Kxe4 Rd4 40 Kf5?? This loses the game.  After 40 Kxe5!  Rd3 41 Ke4 Rxa3 42 Rxf3 Ra4  43 Rb3 Ra2 44 h3 White can still fight.  40...Rd3 41 Kxe5 Rxa3 41 Kf6 Rc3 43 Rd1 Rc6+ 44 Kf5 Kg7 45 Rd7+  The rest is unrecorded  due to time scramble.  Eventually 0-1.

B3) 3...d5 (diagram) Black is once again trying to grab the center here, but White has good chances. Three examples:



B31) 4 a3 a5 5 Bb2 ab4 6 ab4 Rxa1 7 Bxa1 e5 8 Nxe5 Bxb4  9 c3 dc??  10 Qa4+!  Nc6 11 Nxc6 c2+ 12 Nxb4+!  Bd7 13 Qxc2, Black resigns, Zilbermints - Dr. Richard Lewis, Westfield (NJ) Chess Club casual blitz, 2/4/1996.

B32) 4 a3 Nf6 5 Nxd4 e5 6 Nf3 e4 7 Nd4 a5 8 b5 9 e3 00 10 Be2 Be6 11 a4 Nbd7 12 00 Rc8 13 Ba3 Bxa3 14 Rxa3 Ne5 15 f4 ef3 16 Nxf3 Nc4 17 Bxc4 Rxc4 18 Nbd2 Rc8 19 Nd4 Qe7 20 Ra1 Bd7 21 Qf3 Rc3 22 Rfe1 Re8 23 Nf1 Qe5 24 Qf4 h6 25 h3 Ne4 26 Red1 Qh4 27 Qf3 Qg5 28 Rd3 Rc4 29 Rda3 Be6 30 Rad1 Nc3 31 Rda1 Ne4 32 Rd1 Qe7 33 Rda1 Qd6 34 Qe2 Rec8 35 Qe1 Qd8 36 Nd2 Nxd2 37 Qxd2 Bd7 38 R3a2 b6 39 Nb3 Qg5 40 Kh2 Qe5 41 Kg1 Re8 42 Rd1 Bf5 43 Nd4 Be4 The rest is unrecorded due to mutual time scramble. Eventually 0-1, Zilbermints-NM Ilijas Terzic (2339), 4 Rated Games Tonight!, Marshall Chess Club, New York, 5/1/1997.

B4)  3...Nc6 4 a3 (diagram) This is an attempt to stir up complications on the Queenside by attacking and developing at the same time. Three examples:

B411) 4...e5 5 e3?!  An interesting, if somewhat dubious gambit.  White sacrifices the e-pawn to accelerate development and get pressure in the center.  Is it sound?  Who knows?  I cannot make any evaluation based on one game alone!.  Be it as that may, the game Zilbermints - Christopher William, December Grand Prix Tournament, Marshall Chess Club, New York, 12/3/1995, continued 5...de3 6 Bxe3 Nf6? 7 b5! e4 8 bc ef 9 cd+ Bxd7 10 Qxf3 Be7? 11 Bd3 00 12 00 Bc6 13 Qh3 Qc8 14 Qh4 Qg4 15 Qg3 Bd6 16 f4 Qxg3 17 hg3 Rfe8 18 Bd4 Ng4 19 Nd2 Bf8 20 Nc4 Red8 21 c3 Bd5 22 Rfe1 f6 23 Ne3 Nxe3 24 Rxe3 Re8 25 Rxe8 Rxe8 26 Kf2 b6 27 a4 Rc8 28 a5 Bc5 29 ab Bxd4+ 30 cd ab 31 Rb1 Rb8 32 g4 h6 33 g3 Kf7 34 Rc1 Rb7 35 Rc8 Ke6 36 Ke3 b5 37 Rd8 Rb6?? 38 Bf5+!  Kf7 39 Rxd5 b4 40 Bd3 Re6+ 41 Kf3 Rc6 42 Rb5 Rc3 43 Ke4 b3 44 Rxb3, Black resigns.  1-0.



B412) 4...e5 5 c3! This is the correct way to undermine Black’s control of the center.  Once again, note that since since the e-pawn is on its original square, this is no longer a Sicilian Wing Gambit, but an independent variation.

The game Zilbermints - David Diamond (1980), North Jersey Team Championship, 9/22/1996, continued 5...Nf6 6 b5 e4 7 Nxd4 Nxd4 8 Qxd4 d5 9 a4 Be7 10 e3 00 11 Ba3 Bd7 12 Be2 Bxa3 13 Nxa3 Qc7 14 00 Rfc8 15 c4 Bg4 16 Bxg4 Nxg4 17 g3 Qc5 18 Rfd1 Qxd4 19 Rxd4 dc?  20 Rxe4! Nf6 21 Rxc4 Rxc4 22 Nxc4 Rc8 23 Nd6 Rc7 24 e4 Kf8 25 Re1 Rd7 26 e5 Nd5 27 Rc1 Nc7 28 Nxb7 Ne8 29 Na5 Rd4 30 Rc4 Rd1+ 31 Kg2 f6 32 ef6 Nxf6 33 Nc6 Rd7 34 Rd4 Rxd4 35 Nxd4 Nd5 36 a5 Ke8 37 Nc6 a6, Black overstepped, 1-0.  Winning this game helped my team take first place in the 1996 North Jersey Team Championship.



B42) 4...g6?  This is similar to my game against NM Ilan Kreitner, below.  The game Zilbermints-Bauer (2140 FIDE, 1750 USCF) Queens Futurity Tournament, continued 5 Nxd4 Bg7 6 Nxc6 bc6 7 c3 a5 8 Bb2 ab 9 ab Rxa1 10 Bxa1 Nf6 11 e3 Nd5 12 Qb3 00 13 Bc4 Bb7 14 00 Qa8 15 Nd2 Qa7 16 Bb2 Qb8 17 Nf3 Nf6 18 Be2 d6 19 c4 Bc8 20 Nd4 Bd7 21 Bf3 Rc8 22 Bc3 e5 23 Nc2 Be6 24 e4 Nd7 25 Ne3  h5 26 Qc2 Nf6 27 Rd1 g5 28 Be2 Rd8 29 b5 cb 30 cb g4 31 Qd3 Ne8 32 Bb4 Bf8 33 f3 Nf6 34 Bc3 gf 35 Bxf3 Ng4 36 Bxg4 Bxg4 37 Nxg4 hg4 38 Bxe5! Re8 39 Bd4 Qb7 40 Re1 d5 41 Qg3 f5??  42 ef5!  Rxe1+ 43 Qxe1 Bg7 44 Qe8+ Kh7 45 Qg6+ Kg8 46 f6 g3 47 Qxg7 Qxg7 48 fxg7 gh2+ 49 Kxh2 Kf7 50 b6, Black resigns, 1-0.



B5) 3...Nf6 (diagram) A solid, if somewhat passive, move. The game Zilbermints-Colin Bleak (1773) Marshall Chess Club G/30 Open, New York, 11/7/1998, continued    4  a3 a6 5 Bb2 Nc6 6 Nxd4 d5 7 e3 g6 8 Nd2 Bg7 9 Ndf3 00 10 Bd3 Re8 11 00  Bg4 12 Be2 Qc7 13 c4? Nxd4!  14 Bxd4 dc 15 Rc1 b5   16 h3 Bd7 17  Ne5 Rc8 18 Bf3 Bf5 19 a4 Be4 20 a5 Bxf3 21 Qxf3 Qd6 22 g4  Qd5 23 Rfd1 Qxf3 24 Nxf3 Rfd8 25 Bc5 Kf8 26 Nd4 Nd7 27 Ba7 Rc7 28 Bb6!  Nxb6 29 Ne6+!  fxe6 30 Rxd8+ Kf7 31 ab6 Rb7 32 Kf1 Be5 33 Ke2 Rxb6 34 Kd2 Rd6+?  Up to this point Colin played okay. But, with time pressure looming, he stumbles here. 35 Rxd6 ed6 36 Rc2 d5 37 Ra2 Bd6 38 Ke3 Bh2 39 Ra6 Bg1 40 Ra2 Kf6 41 Kd4 Kg5 42 f4 Kh4 43 Rg2 Bxe3 44 Kxe3 Kxh3 45 Kf3 Kh2 The rest is unrecorded due to time scramble.  Eventually 1-0.

  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #24 - 09/01/18 at 07:49:07
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The Zilbermints Benoni: 1 d4 c5 2 b4!
Part One:  Its Origin  and  2...cxb4 3 a3
       

The Benoni Defense is a solid opening with a well-established reputation that attracts players of all classes. It can be equally suitable for positional and tactical play, and has been used  by such players as Fischer, Karpov, and other leading grandmasters.  From a White point of view, the Benoni Defense is a way to avoid the Blackmar-Diemer Gambit and to chicken out into closed positions.  The question is, how do you stop that?  How to force Black into unfamiliar territory? Sure, there is the Sicilian, 2 e4, but that has been investigated back and forth, so unless you feel like memorizing 30-odd moves worth of Grandmaster analysis, don’t bother.  Taking that into consideration, what is White to do?

        On 19 February 1995, while having a break between rounds at the United States Amateur Team East, I invented the Zilbermints Benoni.  The very next day, I beat an old antagonist with it in a blitz match.  Here is that historic first game:

Zilbermints- Ralph Neplokh (1820)
    1 d4 c5 2 b4! cb4 3 a3 Qa5 4 Qd2 Nc6 5 Bb2 e6 6 ab Bxb4+7 c3! and White won a piece and game.

Please note that the main difference between my opening and the Sicilian Defense is the e-pawn.

In the Sicilian, it is on e4; here it either stays on its original square or goes to e3, protecting f2.

This gives the line independent significance.  Also, as the reader will see later on, it is possible to  even gambit the e-pawn, getting piece development and pressure as compensation.

        After 1 d4 c5 2 b4!  Black has three possible answers. They are:
A) 2...cxb4 3 a3, which may or may not transpose to the Sicilian Wing Gambit;
B) 2...cxd4 3 Nf3 which transposes either into the Zilbermints Benoni or the Smith-Morra Gambit (or 1 Nf3 c5 2 d4 cxd4 3 b4!);
C) other moves.

                A) 2...cxb4 3 a3

        A1) 3...e6 4 ab4 Bxb4 5 c3 Be7 6 Bf4 Nf6 7 e3 d6 8 Bd3 b6 9 Nf3 Bb7 10 00 Nbd7 11 Na3 a6 12 Qb3 00 13 Nc4 Qc7 14 Bg3 Bd5 15 e4 Nxe4 16 Bxe4 Bxe4 17 Ncd2 Bb7 18 c4 Nf6 19 Rfb1 Nd7 20 h4 Rab8 21 Qd3 Bc6? 22 Rxa6 Qb7 23 Raa1 Ra8 24 Rxa8 25 c5 dc 26 Nc4
and White eventually won, Zilbermints-Neil Cohen (1872 Quick Chess), Marshall Chess Club Blitz Tournament, 10/6/1995.

        A2) 3...d5 4 ab4 Bf5 5 c3 e6 6 Bf4 Bd6 7 e3 Bxf4 8 ef4 Qc7 9 Qd2 Nf6 10 f3 Nbd7 11 Na3 00 Here White blundered with 12 g4?? Nxg4! and lost in 21 moves, Zilbermints-Ylan Schwartz (2398), U.S. Amateur Team East, 1997. However, 12 Bd3! still keeps the game alive.

        A3) 3...ba3 4 g3  Sort of like a reversed Benko Gambit, with the main difference being the d-pawn. 4...e6 5 Bg2 Nf6 6 Nxa3 Qa5+ 7 Bd2 Bb4 8 Nc4 Bxd2+ 9 Nxd2 Qc3  10 e3 Nc6 11 Ne2 Qb2 12 Rb1 Qa3 13 Nc4 Qe7 14 00 d5 15 Nd2 00 16 c4 b6 17 Nc3 Rd8 18 Qb3 Na5 19 Qa2 Ba6 20 Nb5 Bxb5 21 Rxb5 Rac8 22 c5 Nc4 23 Nxc4  dc4 24 Qxc4 Nd5 25 Bxd5 exd5 26 Qb4 h5 27 cb6 Qxb4 28 Rxb4 ab6 29 Rxb6 Rc2 30 Rfb1 Kh7 31 Kg2 g5 32 Rb7 Kg6 33 R7b5 g4 34 R5b2 Rc4? 35 Ra1 Kf4 36 Rb7 f6 37 Rb6 Rc2 38 Raa6 Rf8 39 Rd6 Rb8 40  Rxf6+ Ke3 41 Ra3, Black resigns, Zilbermints-Raphael D’Lugoff, 4 Rated Games Tonight! Tournament, Marshall Chess Club, New York 11/7/1996.

        A4) 3...g6 4 ab4 e5 5 c3 Bg7 6 d5 d6 7 Be3 Ne7 8 g3 Bd7 9 Bg2 a6 10 Na3 Nf5 11 Bd2 00 12 e4 Ne7 13 Nc4 Bb5 14 Na3 Bd7 15 h4 h5 16 Bh3 f5 17 f3 fxe4 18 fxe4 Qb6 19 Qe2 Bxh3 20 Nxh3 Nd7 21 Nf2 Rf7 22 00 R8f8 23 Kg2 Nf6 24 Nc4 Qc7 25 Ne3 Qd7 26 c4 Qc8 27 Rac1 b6 28 c5! bc5 29 bc5 dc5 30 Nc4 Ne8 31 Nd3 Qc7 32 Ba5 Qb8 33 Nxc5 Rxf1 34 Rxf1 Rxf1 35 Qxf1 Qb5 36 Ne6 Nxd5 37 Nxg7 Qxc4?? 35 Qxc4!, Black resigns, Zilbermints- Ernesto Labate, Westfield (NJ) Grand Prix, 12/13/1998.

        A5) 3...e6 4 ab Bxb4+ 5 c3 Be7 6 e4 transposes to the Sicilian Wing Gambit. This line, which is regarded as good for White by Thomas Kapitaniak in his 1985 book, Sicilian Defense: Wing Gambits can become very dangerous against an unwary opponent. The game Zilbermints-Brian McCarthy (2391), New Jersey Open 1997, 8/31/97, continued 6...d6 7 f4 Nf6 8 Bd3 a6 9 Nf3 h6 10 00 Nc6 11 h3 d5 12 e5 Ne4 13 Bxe4 dxe4 14 Nd2 Nxd4 The first of four cheapos by Black. 15 Nxe4! Nf5 16 Qxd8 Bxd8 17 g4 Nh4 18 Nd6+! Kf8 19 Ba3 Kg8 20 Kh2 Bc7 21 Nd2 Ng6 22 Nd2-e4 White has full compensation plus extra for the pawn. 22...Bd7 23 Nc5  Bc6 24 Ncb7! Bxb7 25 Nxb7 Nxf4!? The second Black cheapo. 26 Bd6!  Nd5 27 c4! Ne3 28 Rf3!  Nc2 29 Rd1 Bb6 30 c5!  Ba7 31 Rdf1 h5 The third Black cheapo, trying to open up the file before my attack crashes through. 32 g5! Nd4 33 Rxf7 Nf5 The last cheapo, which is demolished by a sacrifice. 34 R7xf5! ef5 35 Rxf5 g6 36 Rf6 Kg7 37 e6 Bb8 38 Rf7+ Kg8 39 Rf8+ 40 Rf7+ Kg8 41 Kg2! a5 42 Rf8 Kg7 43 Rxh8! Kxh8 44 e7! Ba7 45 Nd8! h4 46 e8/Q Kh7 47 Qf7+, Black resigns.

      Based on the above games, I would say that White gets good compensation in the 2...cxb4  lines.  For those of you who like flank openings, the Zilbermints Benoni can transpose into variations of the Smith-Morra Gambit, the Sicilian Wing Gambit, the Orangutan/Sokolsky, the French Wing Gambit, or into independent lines.  The reason why I am the only player who uses this  line is because the absolute majority of players, including Sokolsky fans, do not realize the tactical dynamics of this opening.  The games I present here are the only theory on this opening, which is not in most chess books.  Eric Schiller in his huge Unorthodox Chess Openings (1998) calls it  the Nakamura Gambit.  This is incorrect.  When I contacted Clyde Nakamura of Hawaii by e-mail  in December 1998,  he had this to say about Schiller’s placeholder (as it turned out) name:

                “Sorry to disappoint you but I could not find any games with moves 1 d4 c5 2 b4.  The name Nakamura Gambit is a name invented by Eric Schiller.  I have not named any opening after  my own name. In Schiller’s book on Unorthodox Openings (Edition 2) he has the Nakamura Gambit  listed, but this is based on the game   [ a Sicilian Wing Gambit— LDZ ] that I played before at the Hawaii International #4 in a round  2 game against IM Andrianov from Greece. ...

                I believe your name “Zilbermints Benoni” should be the name for the opening 1 d4 c5 2 b4 since I had no part in either the invention or the development of this opening.” [emphasis  mine — LDZ]

                So much for Schiller’s placeholder name!  His analysis is extremely superficial, to say the  least.  Schiller only gives   2...cxb4 3 e4 g6  3...d5; 4 e5 e6 transposes to the Wing Gambit in the French Defense (Schiller, 1998) 4 Nf3 Bg7 5 Bb2 d6 and  I don’t see much compensation for White”  - Schiller.  This is all well and good, but as Nakamura himself notes, this analysis is based on the game Nakamura-Andrianov, by a different order of moves.  That’s  first. Secondly, and more important, White does not have to play 3 e4 to begin with!  The right move, as I convincingly showed above, is 3 a3!

                Now, for some more history.  On the assumption that 1 b4 c5 was very similar to my opening, I researched thousands of 1 b4 c5 games on the Internet computer database, which has two million-plus games.  Sure enough, the computer came up with seven games that transposed into the Zilbermints Benoni.  The two games shown below belong, by classification of analysis, to C) 2... other moves, which will be covered in the upcoming  Part Three of my article.  Because of their historical interest, however, I include them here, out of  sequence.

                1 b4 c5 2 bxc5 e6 3 d4 b6?!  4 cxb6 Qxb6 This position can  also arise from 1 d4 c5 2 b4!  e6 3 bc5 b6?! 4 cxb6 Qxb6 5 e4 Nf6 6 f3 Nc6 7 Be3 Qb2 8 Nd2 Nxd4 9 Bd3 Bc5 10 Kf2 00 11 Nc4 Qb5 12 Rb1 Qa4 13 c3 Qxd1 14 Rxd1 d5 15 Ne5, Black resigns, E.Olej-B.Nemeskal, Hungary 1964.

      1 b4 c5 2 bc5 e5 3 d4! exd4 4 Ba3 Bxc5 Here we once again see a transposition of moves.  In this case, however, the proper move order is 1 d4 c5 2 b4 e5!? 3 bxc5 exd4 4 Ba3 Bxc5.  5 Bxc5 Qa5+ 6 c3 dxc3??  Schiller, who included this game in his Unorthodox Chess Openings, notes that after 6...Qxc5 7 cxd4 Qb4+ 8 Qd2 Qxd2+ (8...Nc6!?) 9 Nxd2 Nc6 10 e3 and White is just a tiny  bit better.  I agree with him there.  7 Qd6 c2+ 8 Nd2!  Black resigns, Ritter-Tuchtenhagen, Postal, Germany 1988.

      In my next article I will cover 2...cxd4 3 Nf3 which is by far the most common move, with fourteen games played.  In that line, my record stands at +10, -3, =1.

      Till next time.

  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #23 - 09/01/18 at 07:44:32
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Jupp53 wrote on 09/01/18 at 01:52:07:
@Gambit
Both links lead here to a 404 error.


try typing htm at the end instead. Or look for Zilbermints Benoni on Internet.
  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #22 - 09/01/18 at 02:26:14
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I very much suspect MnB was commenting on the blind obsessiveness rather than anything else. Peculiarly, BDG has this mindset amongst its devotees more than anything else. Goodness knows why.

Summarising - yes, anything is okay for practical chances. Particularly online.

But, this is a theory site, and it is a place to discuss and  consider whether things are good or not. Bad lines can be shown to be -+, and certain people (perhaps with particular mindsets?) can continue to be excited playing them. Sure, go for it and play whatever in this 8x8 board game. But crassly misplaced '!'s are misleading and unhelpful.

Versus Benoni? Main lines.
Or Nf3 c4 d4 and make it an English.
But not the bad 'b4?'. It is a weak move.

  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #21 - 09/01/18 at 01:52:07
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@Gambit
Both links lead here to a 404 error.
  

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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #20 - 08/31/18 at 05:57:09
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Stigma wrote on 08/30/18 at 09:37:43:
OK, I was trying to be subtle, but that didn't work.

What I really meant to say, MNb, was that Gambit should be able to freely discuss chess openings in whatever style he wants on a chess forum without someone drawing ironic connections to the 3rd Reich.

For all you know he or his family could have personal experience with antisemitism or persecution. And in fact a google search confirms at least the former. So it's tasteless to try to pin him down to aspects of Diemer's writing style that can be associated with nazism. There are plenty of enthusiastic attackers who are happy to use similarly dramatic or biased language, but strictly about the chess fight. Most people manage this distinction just fine even though Diemer didn't.



Thank you for your kind words, Stigma. Indeed, my family fled the horrors of Communist USSR in 1975 to live in a free country. While in first grade in Russia, I had an older boy bully me because I was Jewish. In this country, no one cared what background I was from. While in third grade in USA,  I did not have to put up with bullying.

Now, to the present. I already posted two links to my articles on the Zilbermints Benoni, 1 d4 c5 2 b4!  or 1 d4 c5 2 Nf3 cxd4 3 b4!, yet posters here don't take the trouble to read what I wrote. If you want to start talking variations, read the articles.

For your information, I published an updated version of my articles in Virginia Chess Newsletter in 2000. There were some new games played with 1 d4 c5 2 Nf3 cxd4 3 b4!.

You can talk all you want about computers, but the truth is simple: you cannot use computers in over-the-board chess. So, when you play in OTB tournaments, you have very good chances with the openings I play.

I have beaten strong players with my openings, both in OTB and blitz chess. Will keep you posted on how well 1 d4 c5 2 Nf3 cxd4 3 b4! does.

Oh yeah, the exclamation mark is to denote surprise value, as much as a strong move.
  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #19 - 08/30/18 at 16:48:17
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The OP and occasional readers should know that 1.d4 c5 is covered under: Nimzo and Benonis / Weird Benonis

A thread from there which is relevant to the moves being discussed:
Weird Benonis | 1.d4 c5? http://www.chesspub.com/cgi-bin/chess/YaBB.pl?num=1258982157
  
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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #18 - 08/30/18 at 14:15:51
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Stigma wrote on 08/30/18 at 09:37:43:
OK, I was trying to be subtle, but that didn't work.

What I really meant to say, MNb, was that Gambit should be able to freely discuss chess openings in whatever style he wants on a chess forum without someone drawing ironic connections to the 3rd Reich.

For all you know he or his family could have personal experience with antisemitism or persecution. And in fact a google search confirms at least the former. So it's tasteless to try to pin him down to aspects of Diemer's writing style that can be associated with nazism. There are plenty of enthusiastic attackers who are happy to use similarly dramatic or biased language, but strictly about the chess fight. Most people manage this distinction just fine even though Diemer didn't.


+1
That's what I meant with "no irony" in my post, exactly that. This is chess. If we stay with chess we can discuss everything freely.

Take chess as an art. If you don't divide the art and the artist you have to forget many.
  

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Re: What to play against the benoni?
Reply #17 - 08/30/18 at 09:37:43
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OK, I was trying to be subtle, but that didn't work.

What I really meant to say, MNb, was that Gambit should be able to freely discuss chess openings in whatever style he wants on a chess forum without someone drawing ironic connections to the 3rd Reich.

For all you know he or his family could have personal experience with antisemitism or persecution. And in fact a google search confirms at least the former. So it's tasteless to try to pin him down to aspects of Diemer's writing style that can be associated with nazism. There are plenty of enthusiastic attackers who are happy to use similarly dramatic or biased language, but strictly about the chess fight. Most people manage this distinction just fine even though Diemer didn't.
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
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