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Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4", (Read 5905 times)
emary
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #23 - 12/16/08 at 10:54:57
 
Quote:

Bonsai wrote:
Regarding the long post and the proposal that 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 is a good move order, what about 2...c5 3.d5 b5?
 


Many thanks, bonsai, I missed 3...b5!
Well, 4.c4 -> Benkoe declined
I don't know, but maybe 3.d5 is no option if you want to
avoid the Modern Benoni / Benkoe stuff  Cry .
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #22 - 12/16/08 at 08:13:17
 
Regarding the long post and the proposal that 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 is a good move order, what about 2...c5 3.d5 b5?
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #21 - 12/15/08 at 08:19:32
 
emary: thanks for the long post.
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White: 1.d4 with early c4 OR London/Torre/etc
Black: French|1..e6 Bogo/NID|1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Bb4|1.Nf3 d5 //+Sic.Kan|QGA
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #20 - 12/14/08 at 18:48:44
 
emary wrote on 12/14/08 at 18:43:01:
I agree that the French is a good defence. But vange  playes the black side of the French and so he already knows some ideas. Therefore 1.d4 e6 2.e4 could be a timesaver for him.



No doubt.  

FWIW, I enjoyed reading your "Palliser" post.   Smiley
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« Last Edit: 12/14/08 at 18:49:13 by drkodos »  

I know I've made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission.
 
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #19 - 12/14/08 at 18:43:01
 
I agree that the French is a good defence. But vange  playes the black side of the French and so he already knows some ideas. Therefore 1.d4 e6 2.e4 could be a timesaver for him.
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #18 - 12/13/08 at 23:26:52
 
battleangel wrote on 12/13/08 at 23:02:30:
... believe me it's much better to play against the dutch than against the french.



As former e4 player who converted to d4 (so the mother-in-law would accept me  Wink )   I vouch for that.

So now after 1.d4 e6 I sit and stare for a few minutes and decide to which type of torture I would subject myself.  Understand that 1. ...e6 is a main reason why I switched to d4 so going that route induces a lot of teeth gnashing and Homer vs his Brain talking for the hand to actually reach out and make this move.

Then, as chess would have it, after a 10 minute think at move 2 (!) I finally punt 2.e4 and my partner instantly counters w/2. ...c5 !




So...this is why we play the game, yes?  Like the John Krakauer letter to Outside Magazine penned from the shoulder of Mt. Everest during one its deadliest storms:  "Things did not go as planned."   Who was the military nut that first coined the phrase:  No good plan survives contact with the enemy?  

Obviously a chessplayer.
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« Last Edit: 12/13/08 at 23:29:31 by drkodos »  

I know I've made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission.
 
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #17 - 12/13/08 at 23:02:30
 
Quote:
PALLISER's LINE vs the DUTCH
is 2.Nc3, which is a solid choice. But there is also the annoying move order 1...e6 2...f5. Since 1...e6 has its own flavour I would recommend 2.e4 transposing to the French. You "threaten" the French Exchange which is very annoying for many opponents. This should be a time-saver because you already play the black side of the French.


I think the french players are quite happy with the exchange.
When I played 1.e4 the french defence was the most annoying defence,
I would never let it happen if I can avoid it. The only thing good in this defence is that the players of it are often weak in tactics and calculating, but when a really strong player also with good tactics plays the french, only god can help you. It is so easy to lose the grip and give the advantage to black in this opening, and then you are under real psychological pressure, because you gave the opening advantage to black, and in these positions it is so hard to get any real counterplay,
and you feel like you already lost.
The choice from Palliser to play against the dutch with 1. ... e6 similar to the Queen's gambit with Knight on e2 and pawns on f3 is a very good plan tbh, much much better than playing against the french.
Also it is not really a timesaver, there are many different lines in the french, normally you can only play one line, but against Nd2, Nc3 I think there are 3 different lines ... believe me it's much better to play against the dutch than against the french.
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« Last Edit: 12/13/08 at 23:04:49 by battleangel »  
 
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #16 - 12/13/08 at 21:52:50
 
Dear vange!

From my point of view most important to improve in chess is a wellorganized thought process. Have a look at Heisman (chesscafe.com), it could help you.

Second important is tactics. Your black rep tends to avoid early tactical battles and so does Palliser's rep. Nevertheless training of tactics is essential.

There is much more to study to become a strong player. You should consult a coach or a very strong clubmate (expert level at least), show him some of your games and he will tell you what you should study to improve. 
(Nobody expects to become good at playing the piano without a teacher.)

Before studying openings you should study the opening principles.
It would be a good idea to study some sharp stuff in the open games.
Morphy's games often are very enlightening how to punish weak opening play. 
It will happen very often that your opponent makes a weak move very early, but you don't know how to exploit it by heart, therefore studying the opening principles and middlegame principles is very important.

You want a repertoire for your whole life. In the age of databases this means you are asking for trouble. Many player prepare for their opponent. It is sensible to start with a rep and play it let's say for a year. But then it is very important to enlarge your rep and become more flexible. I played the French for years but abandoned it when I realized I play open positions bad. I started to play 1.e4 e5 without much preparation and despite some heavy defeats it was very good for my chess-understanding.

To Palliser's book on 1.d4:

Richard Palliser presents a very solid white repertoire
after 1.d4 ... 2.c4 avoiding the most trendy (most
challenging and most interesting) main lines.   
I cannot imagine that one of his major lines will ever
be refuted.

A big advantage of Palliser's repertoire
compared to Tony Kosten's fine book on the English opening
(white repertoire after  1.c4 ... 2.g3)
is that you can easily replace some of Palliser's lines against
the Indian Defences with sharper or less sharp lines
without having to change your whole repertoire.

1.d4 d5  is another story. Palliser's main idea is to
prevent the SemiSlav. Therefore it would be dangerous
to replace parts of Palliser's rep
because of some black move order tricks. 


CAN A 1500 USE Palliser's book?
Palliser gives some basic instructions, but I think you will need more
explanations to take the maximum out of his book. His repertoire is a bit subtle and you should analyse your games with a much stronger clubmate who has an idea about the variation you have played.

As an additional reading to Palliser I recommend
1) "Sadler: The Queens Gambit Declined". Sadler gives some 
elementary and some more advanced instructions about the
QGD in form of a fictive dialog between novize and teacher. I believe
Sadler's book would be very good for your general chess-understanding.
You are defending the black side of the QGD too, so it should be very
useful. Sadler's book was Book of the Year in 2000, therefore   
you can certainly borrow it from a clubmate or buy a used copy.   

2) "Gallagher: Starting Out: The King's Indian" (there exists an
electronic version, which has the same contents as the book) 
The KID is very instructive and you will learn a lot about
the closed game and pawn chains in general.  You will meet the  KID
very often, because it is a universal system against closed openings. 
Therefore I bet you will want to sharpen your repertoire against
it after you have consolidated  your white repertoire in general.
Again it should be easy to get a cheap copy of this book.



PALLISER'S  c4 BEFORE Nf3 Move-order
With the exception of the Gruenfeld and the King's Indian
Palliser recommends a 1.d4 2.c4 3.Nf3 move order
against 1...d5 and 1...Nf6. I strongly believe that
playing 2.Nf3 is prefareable because it is more flexible and you
can enlarge your rep with promising versions of queen's pawn
openings (Excellent stuff by Eric Prie at ChessPub, you could learn
a lot from his comments even if you don't play these damned queen's pawn openings  Wink .) Especially some versions of the London system could be sensible for you, because one of Palliser's main recommendations could be viewed as a reversed London system.   
If you play the whole repertoire of Palliser's book,
the move-order between Nf3 and c4 makes almost no difference.

Advantages of the Nf3 c4 move order:
1) After 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 black's most common is Nf6 and 3.c4 transposes back to Palliser's rep, but you have prevented the sharp ALBIN counter gambit.  If your opponent doesn't play 2...Nf6 then he has something special in mind.

2) A CHIGORIN devotee has to play 2...Nc6 before you have
committed to c4. So you get some additional and annoying options
for free, for instance 1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Lf4 followed by c4 and
Sc3.
Of course Palliser's recommendation (3.c4 ) is very good, but the game can become really sharp and requires detailed preparation by white.
There are some outstanding books about the CHIGORIN (recently  Morozevich and Bronznik) so I bet a black player will be prepared.

3) If your opponent tries to move order you into the RAUSIS-system,
he has to play 2.Nf3 c6. Now 3.Bf4 should be an improved version of
the London system (no pressure against d4) and would be very annoying for a competitive guy.

4) If your opponent wants to get the unbalanced and difficult to
play ABRAHAMS-NOTEBOOM-variation, he must play c6 or e6.
After e6 you could go for a COLLE (Palliser has written a book
about it recently) or the LONDON. Of course Palliser   
prevents the ABRAHAMS in his 1.d4-book too.

5) By playing 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 you prevent the Budapest and
the Fajarowicz. Recently these gambits were covered in detail by
Gutman and Moskalenko, so their popularity could increase.

6) After 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 again your opponent has to show his
intentions first! 
After 2...e6 instead of 3.c4 the London is an option,
but also the Torre attack with 3.Bg5. After black has comitted to
e6 I believe the Colle-system is another option, but strangely
I cannot find a book which handles this version of the Colle.
2...c5 is considered a bit risky, so this way you can not only
prevent the Queens Indian / Bogo Indian, but also many Modern Benonis and Benkoe-gambits.

7) After 2...c5 3.d5 is considered promising for white, if he doesn't
follow up with c4, but I don't know a book which gives details about
this Anti-Benoni.

8) 2...d6 could be answered by 3.Nc3 threatening to transpose to
a classical Pirck.

9) Gruenfeld: 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.c4 Bg7 4.Nc3 d5 5.Bg5 is Palliser's
starting position of the Gruenfeld if you adopt a 2.Nf3 move-order.
Note that 3...d5 would be a common mistake because of   
4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nb6 6.h3! and white has a fine and safe center (pointed out by Rowson).    

Advantages of 2.c4
1) Against the KID Palliser starts with 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3
and white can still play all main systems.
After 2.Nf3 he cannot play the Saemisch and the h3 Bg5 system, which scores heavily.
2) Against the Gruenfeld you have again all options by playing 2.c4 and 3.Nc3.
After 2.Nf3 you cannot play 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Lc4 c5 8.Ne2



PALLISER'S REP after 1.d4 d5

SLAV / SEMISLAV
Palliser's main idea is to delay Nc3. This enables him to
escape the sharp Semislav lines and present some unusual problems
to the devotees of the trendy Semislav and the Chebanenko (=a6-Slav).
As a consequence Palliser has to allow 
the "Slow Slav" 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Sf3 Sf6 4.e3 Lf5, which you will
have to face very often. You should also study 3...dxc4 carefully, which is an attempt to reach a complicated position and was recommended by some recent sources for black.

QUEENSGAMBIT ACCEPTED
With a 2.Nf3 moveorder you make some black tries to
mix things up more risky.
After 1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 white's safest is 3.e3. The downside of this approach is the e5 counterstroke.
Of course Palliser's 3.Nf3 is a good move, but then it is very important to study black's third move options carefully. 

QUEENSGAMBIT DECLINED
Preventing most of the Semislav forces Palliser into
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5 (4. Nc3 c6 and you are
move-ordered). I think the experienced Semislav player
will have  prepared something against this approach. An
inexperienced player could be already on his own. Therefore 
you should work through black's fourth move alternatives
carefully. In the main lines of the QGD there are some
nuances because of delaying Sc3 and again black has more
difficulties  to sharpen the game than usual in the QGD.   

PALLISER's LINE vs the DUTCH
is 2.Nc3, which is a solid choice. But there is also the annoying move order 1...e6 2...f5. Since 1...e6 has its own flavour I would recommend 2.e4 transposing to the French. You "threaten" the French Exchange which is very annoying for many opponents. This should be a time-saver because you already play the black side of the French.

PALLISER'S major lines against the INDIAN defences: 
(Starting out I would prevent QID, Modern Benoni, Benkoe and Blumenfeld and concentrate on the KID and Gruenfeld first. I think a Colle setup fits well with Palliser's lines, London or Torre attack are not bad either.) 

QID
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.e3
                      Bb4 4.Nd2
                      c5 -> Benoni

Modern Benoni
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 e6 4.Nc3 exd5 5.cxd5 d6 6Nf3 g6 7.Bf4

Benkoe
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.Nf3 g6 5.cxb5 a6 6.b6!

Blumenfeld
            2... e6 3.Nf3 c5 4.d5 b5 5.Lg5



KID
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Nf3 0-0 6.Le2 e5 7.d5   

Gruenfeld
1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Bg5

Against 1...g6 Palliser recommends the Modern.
In the final chapter Palliser deals with black's other tries.

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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #15 - 12/09/08 at 11:45:12
 
A while ago I looked at Palliser"s game in which he employed his recommended repertoire and his results were quite poor.

Regarding the contents of the book, I think the layout is a pain in the §$%, not easy at all to navigate or get a quick overview of the lines he recommends.
Personally, I used some of the lines with mixed success, most of them are quite counter-intuitive, so you really have to study them in detail before employing them.
BTW, I rather prefer John cox's book, as these repertoire books should be used only as a guide to be completed with computer-aided analysis and up-to-date games.
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #14 - 12/08/08 at 11:46:23
 
???

The book gives 10.Bb3 Nd4. Nowhere is 10..Bb7.


sssthepro wrote on 12/16/06 at 09:33:44:
well, I think I found a refutation somewhere, but maybe Mr Palliser or someone else can ehlighten me. If so, please email me at the.rafflesian@gmail.com. 

The question I have is regarding the Furman Variation in the book. I think this is in the first game of the chapter, between Timman and Lautier.

1.d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5.Bxc4 a6 6. Qe2 c5 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. 0-0 0-0 9. e4 b5 10. Bb3 Bb7 11. Nbd2 Qc7 12. e5 Nfd7 13. Re1 Nc6 14. Bc2! This is given in the book I think(I cannot remember because I lent the book to someone) and it is written that White is better because White has an attack and if Black is not careful, the bishop will whack h7. However, isn't Black better after 14...Nb4 or the stronger 14...Ndxe5? For example,for the latter, 15. Nxe5 Nd4 16. Qd1 Nxc2 17. Qxc2?? Bxf2+!. I check with my computer but even it cannot find anything and gave - 0.60 to -0.80.


Can someone tell me what is wrong with it? thanks.

Oh yah, please email me

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« Last Edit: 12/08/08 at 11:47:10 by HoemberChess »  

as
White: 1.d4 with early c4 OR London/Torre/etc
Black: French|1..e6 Bogo/NID|1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Bb4|1.Nf3 d5 //+Sic.Kan|QGA
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #13 - 12/16/06 at 09:34:56
 
Other than that, I think the book is awesome! I am a e4 player, but won all my current d4 game following all of Richard's advice!! three cheers for Richard!
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #12 - 12/16/06 at 09:33:44
 
well, I think I found a refutation somewhere, but maybe Mr Palliser or someone else can ehlighten me. If so, please email me at the.rafflesian@gmail.com. 

The question I have is regarding the Furman Variation in the book. I think this is in the first game of the chapter, between Timman and Lautier.

1.d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. e3 e6 5.Bxc4 a6 6. Qe2 c5 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. 0-0 0-0 9. e4 b5 10. Bb3 Bb7 11. Nbd2 Qc7 12. e5 Nfd7 13. Re1 Nc6 14. Bc2! This is given in the book I think(I cannot remember because I lent the book to someone) and it is written that White is better because White has an attack and if Black is not careful, the bishop will whack h7. However, isn't Black better after 14...Nb4 or the stronger 14...Ndxe5? For example,for the latter, 15. Nxe5 Nd4 16. Qd1 Nxc2 17. Qxc2?? Bxf2+!. I check with my computer but even it cannot find anything and gave - 0.60 to -0.80.


Can someone tell me what is wrong with it? thanks.

Oh yah, please email me
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #11 - 12/14/06 at 06:18:29
 
One of my pet peeves is overuse of exclams.

"1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e3 e6 5.Nbd2! Nbd7 6.b3 Bd6 7.Bb2 0-0 8.Bd3 Qe7 9.Ne5 Ba3 10.Bxa3 Qxa3 11. Nxd7! Bxd7 12.c5 b6 13.Qc1 Qa5 14.f4! preventing 14...bxc5 15.Qxc5 Qxc5 16.dxc5 e5."

16...e5 is not prevented. 17.fxe5 Ng4 (or even 17...Rfe8 or 17...Rae8) and black is fine as far as I can see and then both 11.Nxd7 and 14.f4 should't have exclams. Also, I would use !? for 5.Nbd2.

How about 11.f4 instead?
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« Last Edit: 12/14/06 at 06:32:23 by Alias »  

I like to move it move it.
 
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #10 - 03/07/05 at 07:30:22
 
I used the book to vary my openings a bit especially in blitz. As a confirmed e4 player of under 1800, I found it quite understandable, especially if you actually play through the entire games and keep in mind the remarks he makes. The comments are not as clear or entertaining as Rowson in his Grünfeld book or Uhlmann's on the french (which imo are two of the very best opening books), but I think he surpasses most other writers in relevance, clarity and consistancy. Especially if you compare it with other repertoire books, where I either dont trust many of the lines, see big gaps in the repertoire or optimistic talk about systems.

I used the Slav chapter the most until now, because it is the first chapter and most of the people at my club have that as the answer to d4. Worked like a charm with 3/3 against slightly better opposition. Especially the line in the very first game of the book horrored the opponents twice.
I also liked his recommendations against the KID an Grünfeld with which I am more familiar as I play them with black. I liked the chapters of the QID and QGD as well, though I havent taken a thorough look at those yet. The Benko and Benoni I havent looked at as I plan on playing Nf3 iso d5 as to may be trick them into a Maroczy Sicilian and I dont like studying on things I see twice a year, same goes gor the QGA.
Cant judge the quality of the dutch as I havent had a chance to play any of the lines, while of the minors I can say that his Budapest recommendation is good as the lines he uses are the reason I gave up that opening.
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Re: Richard Palliser's book "Play 1.d4",
Reply #9 - 03/04/05 at 16:45:01
 
Some previous posters have "complained" a bit about the dutch, slav and Grünfeld chapters in the book. I actually think the slav chapter is wonderful, I just love the resulting positions (whether black does face theoretical problems or not). The Anti-Grünfeld systems is quite pleasant to play if you like positional play and I am quite happy with the positions one gets. Okay, the dutch is a very difficult thing, which is why I play it, of course  Wink.

The Benoni chapter is indeed good, too - finally someone has recommended something other than the Flick-Knife aka Taimanov attack.

I don't feel comfortable with the positions I get in the recommended KID, QGD and Benkö systems, but that's probably mostly a matter of not really understanding the positions (more guidance would have helped, particularly in the Benkö). I suppose the QGD systems are also a bit dull, or rather I don't understand how to put pressure on black in those positions.

Something nobody else has mentioned: The QID chapter is quite interesting, it's worked out quite nicely in a couple of games for me, although mostly it got me through the opening without having to know much theory.
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