Latest Updates:
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 
Topic Tools
Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Smith-Morra (Read 53578 times)
chessy
Full Member
***
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 189
Location: Europe
Joined: 12/17/04
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #44 - 01/06/05 at 12:20:55
Post Tools
Yes it looks like that white has compensation after
12.) b3    i would suggest to play
12.)...b6 13.) Bb2 Bb7  and e.g after 14.)Tc1 both

A  14.)...Sh4 and    B 14.)...Sb4  8)

looks playable to me. For me the position is unclaer! Grin

???thought?? ???
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Rajmund_Emanuel
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I love ChessPublishing
.com!

Posts: 19
Location: Prague
Joined: 06/04/04
Gender: Male
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #43 - 12/22/04 at 15:15:05
Post Tools
The variant which showed Chessy me partial, but it sems, that approach to advantage White exists. Like always about Morra gambit is possible to say: It is difficult but it is possible (incidentally I receive that my English is terrible)

1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 e6 5.Bc4 Bc5 6.Nf3 Ne7 7.e5 Ng6 [7...0-0 8.Ne4 Bb4+ 9.Bd2 Nbc6 10.0-0 d5 11.exd6 Bxd6 12.Bg5 Bc7 13.Qe2|^;  7...d5 8.exd6 Bxd6 (8...Qxd6 9.Qxd6 Bxd6 10.Nb5|^) 9.Nb5|^] 8.Ne4 Nc6 (chessy var.)  [8...Bb4+ 9.Bd2|^] 9.0-0! [9.Nxc5?! Qa5+ 10.Bd2 Qxc5-/+] 9...Be7 [9...Qb6 10.Nd6+ Bxd6 11.exd6 Nce5 12.Nxe5 Nxe5 13.Bb3 0-0 14.Be3 Qb4 15.Qh5 Ng4 16.Qh4->] 10.Nd6+ Bxd6 11.exd6 0-0 12.b3|^
Shocked
Rajmund
« Last Edit: 03/01/05 at 05:57:22 by Rajmund_Emanuel »  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
MNb
God Member
*****
Offline


Rudolf Spielmann forever

Posts: 10646
Location: Moengo
Joined: 01/05/04
Gender: Male
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #42 - 12/17/04 at 16:03:39
Post Tools
The former post I have typed from memory, but now I have found four relevant games:

1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Pxc3 Pc6 5.Pf3 e6 6.Lc4 a6 7.0-0 b5 8.Lb3 Pge7 9.Lf4 Pg6 10.Lg3 f6 11.De2 Lc5 12.Tfd1 De7 13.Tac1 0-0 14.Pd5 exd5 15.Txc5 Dxc5 16.Txd5 Dxd5 17.Lxd5+ Kh8 18.Ld6 Td8 19.h4 and White is better, though he eventually lost, Briem-Mortensen, Reykjavik Open, 1990.

1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Pxc3 Pc6 5.Pf3 e6 6.Lc4 a6 7.0-0 b5 8.Lb3 Lc5 9.Lf4 Pge7 10.e5 Pg6 11.Lg3 0-0 12.h4 Le7 13.Lc2 Lb7 14.Pe4 Pb4 15.Lb1 Kh8 16.Pfg5 h6 17.Dh5 De8 18.Pf6 Lxf6 19.exf6 Pd5 20.Pe4 Kh7 21.Pd6 Pxf6 22.De2 Db8 23.h5 Pxh5 24.Dxh5 f5 25.Pxf5 1-0 Carr-Smart, Bank's Match, 1989.

1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Pxc3 Pc6 5.Pf3 e6 6.Lc4 Bc5 7.o-o Nge7 8.Bf4 a6 9.e5 o-o 10.Ne4 Ba7 11.Bf4 Qc7
12.Nf6+! gxf6 13.Bxf6 Nf5 14.Nd4 Nxe5 15.Nxf5 h6 16.Qg4 Nxg4 17.Ne7+ Kh7; 18.Bd3,
Mate, Burgess-Jacobsen, 1992.

According to Flesch White must postpone e4-e5 a bit: 8.e5? Ng6 9.Qe2 Nd4! -+.


1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Pxc3 e6 5.Pf3 Pc6 6.Lc4 Lc5 7.0-0 a6 8.De2 Pge7 9.Lf4 Pg6 10.Lg3 0-0 11.Tad1 b5 12.Lb3 Db6 13.h4 Pd4 14.Pxd4 Lxd4 15.Txd4 Dxd4 16.Td1 Db6 17.h5 Pe7 18.Ld6 Pc6 19.e5 Lb7 20.Pe4 Pd4 21.Pf6+ gxf6 22.Dg4+ Kh8 23.Le7 Dd8 24.Lxd8 1-0
Hania-De Boer, Leeuwarden Open,1994.

  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
GC Lichtenberg
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
chessy
Guest


Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #41 - 12/17/04 at 10:06:17
Post Tools
Thanks for your response. But I still think the position after

1. e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 e6 5.Nf3 Bc5 6.Bc4 Ne7 6.Bc4 Ne7 7.e5 Ng6 8.Ne4 Nc6

is ok for black

I agree that the image of  early Bc5 and Ne7 is not good. I thought because of the above mentioned line (am I wrong?) but I do not agree to that assessment.

eg. 9.)Nxc5 Qa5+ 10.)Bd2 Qxc5 and it is hard for white to protect e5 pawn

According to me the best for white is 9. 0-0 Be7 10. Nd6 Bxd6 exd6 and the black position is a little bit cramped but is this enough for the pawn? I think black can castle and then probably play b6. To me this seem acceptable for black.

However I am open to learn.... Wink
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
MNb
God Member
*****
Offline


Rudolf Spielmann forever

Posts: 10646
Location: Moengo
Joined: 01/05/04
Gender: Male
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #40 - 12/17/04 at 09:03:41
Post Tools
First this is not Timman's idea; 2nd all source I know state that the Bc5, Ne7 setup is good for White, also after 6...Nc6. Ideas are similar: 7.e5 Ne7 8.Bf4 Ng6 9.Bg3 and Ne4 to follow.
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
GC Lichtenberg
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
chessy
Guest


Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #39 - 12/17/04 at 07:02:17
Post Tools
sorry 8. ...Nc6  (not in the 6th move)
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
chessy
Guest


Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #38 - 12/17/04 at 06:57:02
Post Tools
I wondering why nobody has taken up the Idea of Timman

1. e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 e6 5.Nf3 Bc5!? 6.Bc4 Ne7!?

In some books I found the line

6.Bc4 Ne7 7.e5 Ng6 8.Ne4 and some oder moves more with advantage for white. But I think after

6. ...Nc6 Black is fine

However I would be glad if somebody can refute this line
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Klick
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 528
Joined: 01/31/03
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #37 - 11/10/04 at 20:52:21
Post Tools
Thank you everyone for great replies to my initial posting, it has been helpful. I have been away for some months, which is the reason I have not replied. Undecided I must admit that I have not had a serious look at every line you recommend, as I was attracted to AmateurD. initial reply, where he outlined the plan of an early a6 and b5, then e6,d6 and putting the knight on d7, queen on b8. It seems, however,  logical to me to complete development fully first, before considering Nf6. My idea is to play Be7 before Nf6, as white just seems to be waiting for Nf6 (e5).

Black`s setup seems good to me, at least against white`s standard plan of Qe2 and rooks on d1 and c1. White does not seem to be given any weak squares to work on and the Black setup is quite simple.

Unless white comes up with some ideas here, I will be attracted to this line Smiley

{And thank you Topnotch, for your informative posting.  "Bailing out" with Nf6 is not an option for me when I am given the chance to win.  Grin }

  

There just isn't enough televised chess - DAVID LETTERMAN
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
bewildered
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I love ChessPublishing
.com!

Posts: 9
Location: Herts
Joined: 03/09/03
Gender: Male
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #36 - 09/23/04 at 11:19:03
Post Tools
Generally I would not suggest that a prospective Sicilian player needs fear the Morra, Few of the world's best players use it, and they are hardly ever on the receiving end.  That said I would suggest that a coherent system be adopted, ad-libbing is likely to get somewhat fraught.

I wonder what Mr Lane thinks of 1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3. c3 dxc3 4. Nxc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 d6 6.e5.  I have looked everywhere including ECO and BCO (There is only one game on my Database) and can find no prescribed remedy against this unusually early early e-pawn advance.   ???

After a little prompting my little software friends are pointing me at 6...e6, the remedy if first 6.Bc4 a6 were to be interposed.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
MNb
God Member
*****
Offline


Rudolf Spielmann forever

Posts: 10646
Location: Moengo
Joined: 01/05/04
Gender: Male
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #35 - 08/02/04 at 11:02:00
Post Tools
Usually, when Black plays an early e6-e5, White has sufficient compensation due to the strong d5 square and the backward d6 pawn. This does not mean that White is better, of course.
As The Sicilian is an ambitious counter attacking defence indeed, Black might want something else. My recommendations as an ex Morra player:
A) a6, d6, e6, Nge7 setup.
B) Dragon setup.
Of course these are more risky than the several e6-e5 systems, but they also offer better chances to take over the initiative.
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
GC Lichtenberg
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bernhard
Guest


Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #34 - 08/01/04 at 18:06:35
Post Tools
Sorry I didn't notice that there was a game with 11.Bg3.
Palkövi gives 11.Be3 Nf6 12.Rd2
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
TopNotch
God Member
*****
Offline


I only look 1 move ahead,
but its always the best

Posts: 2151
Joined: 01/04/03
Gender: Male
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #33 - 08/01/04 at 11:05:15
Post Tools
I gave six sample games, and it would have been nice to know 12.Rd2 in which one Grin

Be that as it may, and should this 12.Rd2 really prove to  lead to a draw, I hardly consider that a tragedy for black.

Top Grin
  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bernhard
Guest


Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #32 - 08/01/04 at 10:39:23
Post Tools
In the line given by TopNotch White can improve with  12.Rd2 as recommended by Burgess and Palkövi.
This could be good enough for a draw.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
TopNotch
God Member
*****
Offline


I only look 1 move ahead,
but its always the best

Posts: 2151
Joined: 01/04/03
Gender: Male
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #31 - 07/31/04 at 17:45:52
Post Tools
Ohh dear what is Klick (U know?, the guy that started this post) to make of all this confusion, he asked a simple question and must now be more confused than ever. Tsk, tsk.  Grin

Klick, to make a long story short, the books have always considered the Smith Morra to be dubious, and various books have reccommended various different 'Refutations'. Now here is the stunner, despite what any of the books say, and despite its poor theoretical status, if you choose to accept this gambit and hang on to it you will have to defend well and be alert to haul in the full point.

My personal feeling is that the Smith Morra is junk, but that is my bias. Defending against this gambit successfully in practice below master level is by no means a trivial matter, and since it is not seen very often at Master level the would be defender has no reliable point of reference to emulate.

The e z thing to reccommend is to bail out with 3...Nf6, transposing to the Alapin, but this reply may not suit those who do not have 3...Nf6 in their Repertoire against the Alapin. Before continuing, I think it needs to be said that the Sicilian is a fearless complex counter attacking system, and if the prospect of facing the Morra is so terrifying then perhaps one should not consider playing the Sicilian at all. Virtually all the mainlines of the Sicilian are a labyrinth of almost unfathomable complications, the best one can do is take a deep breath and plunge right in. Eventually the tactical themes and typical play will begin to be assimilated as u play and gain more experience with your chosen system.

Research my posts, as somewhere on this forum I outlined in detail a study plan on how to come to grips with the Sicilian in a systematic and painless way. If u can't find it lemme know.

Now, if you must accept this gambit I think that the line that IM Jeremy Silman advocates is a very good one. I do not claim that it's any better or worse than other accepted lines of the Smith Morra, but its easy to play and very reliale:

[Event "Mar del Plata"]
[Site "Mar del Plata"]
[Date "1962.??.??"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Parma,Bruno"]
[Black "Eliskases,Erich Gottlieb"]
[Result "1/2"]
[Eco "B21"]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.c3 dxc3 5.Nxc3 d6 6.Bc4 Nc6 7.0-0 Be7 8.Qe2 a6
9.Rd1 Bd7 10.Bf4 e5 11.Be3 Nf6 12.h3 0-0 13.Rac1 Rc8 14.Bd5 b5 15.a3 Na5 16.Nd2 Be6
17.b4 Nc6 18.Nb3 Qd7 19.Rc2 Bd8 20.Qd3 Ne7 21.Bxe6 Qxe6 22.Nd2 Rc6 23.Rdc1 Bb6 24.Bxb6 Rxb6
25.Nf1 d5 26.exd5 Nfxd5 27.Nxd5 Nxd5 28.Rc5 Nf4 29.Qf3 Rd6 30.Rd1 Rxd1 31.Qxd1 f5 32.Kh2 e4
33.Qd4 Nd3 34.Rc7 Qe5+ 35.Qxe5 Nxe5 36.Ne3 f4 37.Nd5 Nc4 38.Re7 Rf5 39.Nc3 e3 40.fxe3 fxe3
41.Nd1 Kf8 42.Re4 Nxa3 43.Nxe3 Rf7 44.Rd4 Ra7 45.Rd3 Nc4 46.Nxc4 bxc4 47.Rd8+ Ke7 48.Rc8 a5
49.bxa5 Rxa5 50.Rxc4  1/2

[Event "SLO-ch sf"]
[Site "Slovenia"]
[Date "1994.??.??"]
[Round "0"]
[White "Pinter,Andrej"]
[Black "Podlesnik,Bogdan"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "B21"]
1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 e6 6.Bc4 a6 7.0-0 d6 8.Qe2 Be7
9.Rd1 Bd7 10.Bf4 e5 11.Be3 Nf6 12.h3 0-0 13.b4 Nxb4 14.Rab1 b5 15.Rxb4 d5 16.Bxd5 Bxb4
17.Bxa8 Qxa8 18.Nd5 Nxd5 19.exd5 Bd6 20.Ng5 Bf5 21.Qf3 Bg6 22.h4 h6 23.h5 Bxh5 24.Qxh5 hxg5
25.Bxg5 f6 26.Bh6 Qb7 27.Qg4 f5 28.Qg6 Rf6 29.Qe8+ Kh7 30.Bg5 Qf7 31.Qd8 Be7 32.Qd7 Qh5
33.Rd3 Qxg5 34.Qxe7 Qc1+ 35.Kh2 Qf4+ 36.Kg1 Rh6 37.Rh3 Qc1+ 38.Kh2 Rxh3+ 39.gxh3 Qe1 40.Qh4+ Kg6
41.d6 Qd2 42.Qe7 Qxf2+ 43.Kh1 Qe1+ 44.Kh2 Qd2+ 45.Kh1 Qc1+ 46.Kg2 Qc2+ 47.Kh1 Qb1+ 48.Kh2 Qxa2+
49.Kg1 Qb1+ 50.Kh2 Qc2+ 51.Kh1 Qc1+ 52.Kh2 Qf4+ 53.Kg2 Qd2+ 54.Kh1 Qe1+ 55.Kh2 Qf2+ 56.Kh1 Qf1+
57.Kh2 Qe2+ 58.Kh1 Qd1+ 59.Kh2 Qc2+ 60.Kh1 Qb1+ 61.Kg2 Qb2+ 62.Kh1 Qa1+ 63.Kg2 Qa2+ 64.Kg1 Qa1+
65.Kh2 Qb2+ 66.Kg1 Qc1+ 67.Kh2 Qd2+ 68.Kg1 Qe1+ 69.Kh2 Qe2+ 70.Kh1 f4 71.d7 Qe1+ 72.Kh2 Qg3+
73.Kh1 Qxh3+ 74.Kg1 f3 75.Qd6+ Kh7 76.Qd2 Qg3+ 77.Kf1 f2 78.Qxf2 Qh3+ 79.Ke1 Qxd7 80.Qh2+ Kg6
81.Qxe5 a5 82.Qe4+ Kf6 83.Qh4+ g5 84.Qh6+ Kf5 85.Qh3+ g4 86.Qh5+ Ke4 87.Qg6+ Kd4 88.Qb6+ Kd3
89.Qg6+ Kc3 90.Qf6+ Qd4 91.Qc6+ Qc4 92.Qf6+ Kb3 93.Qd8 Qe4+ 94.Kd2 a4 95.Qg8+ Qc4 96.Qg5 Qd4+
97.Ke1 a3 98.Kf1 Qc4+ 99.Kg1 a2 100.Qe3+ Kb2 101.Qd2+ Kb1 0-1

[Event "IECC"]
[Site "IECC email"]
[Date "1998.??.??"]
[Round "0"]
[White "Camper,Donald Lynn"]
[Black "Bliznyuk,Andrey"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "B21"]
1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 d6 5.Bc4 e6 6.Nf3 a6 7.0-0 Be7 8.Qe2 Nc6
9.Rd1 Bd7 10.Bf4 e5 11.Be3 Nf6 12.h3 0-0 13.g4 Be6 14.Bd5 Bxd5 15.Nxd5 Nxd5 16.Rxd5 Rc8
17.a3 b5 18.Rad1 Qc7 19.b4 Rfe8 20.Nh2 Nb8 21.Nf1 Nd7 22.Ng3 g6 23.g5 Qb7 24.R5d3 Rc4
25.h4 Rec8 26.h5 Rc3 27.Qg4 Rxd3 28.Rxd3 Rc4 29.hxg6 hxg6 30.Bd2 Bf8 31.Qf3 Nb6 32.Be3 Na8
33.Bd2 Nc7 34.Be3 Ne6 35.Qd1 Qc6 36.Qg4 Rc3 37.Qd1 Be7 38.Ne2 Rxd3 39.Qxd3 Bxg5 40.Bxg5 Nxg5
41.Nc3 Ne6 42.Nd5 Qc1+ 43.Kg2 Kg7 44.Qf3 Qg5+ 45.Kf1 Nd4 46.Qg3 Qxg3 47.fxg3 Ne6 48.Kf2 Kh6
49.Nf6 Nc7 50.Kf3 Kg7 51.Nd7 f6 52.g4 Kf7 53.Nb6 Ke6 54.a4 d5 55.axb5 axb5 56.Nc8 dxe4+
57.Kxe4 f5+ 58.gxf5+ gxf5+ 59.Kd3  0-1

[Event "Prokojevsk2"]
[Site "Prokojevsk"]
[Date "1998.??.??"]
[Round "0"]
[White "Yankin,Vadim"]
[Black "Isupov,Vladimir"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "B21"]
1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 d6 6.Bc4 e6 7.Qe2 Be7 8.0-0 a6
9.Rd1 Bd7 10.Bf4 e5 11.Be3 Nf6 12.Nd5 Nxd5 13.Bxd5 0-0 14.h3 Rc8 15.Nd2 Nb4 16.Bxb7 Bb5
17.Qg4 Rb8 18.Bh6 Bf6 19.Bd5 Nc2 20.Rac1 Nd4 21.Bc4 Bd7 22.Qg3 Rxb2 23.Nb3 Be6 24.Nxd4 exd4
25.Bxa6 Rxa2 26.Bd3 Qa5 27.h4 Kh8 28.Bg5 Be5 29.f4 Bf6 30.Bxf6 gxf6 31.Bf1 Rg8 32.Qd3 Qh5
33.f5 Qxh4 34.fxe6 Qf2+ 35.Kh1 Rxg2 36.Rc8+ Kg7 0-1

[Event "Oz.com qual blitz"]
[Site "Internet ICC"]
[Date "2000.03.05"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Al Sayed,Mohammed"]
[Black "Zaremba,Andrie"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "B21"]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.c3 dxc3 5.Nxc3 Nc6 6.Bc4 e6 7.0-0 Be7 8.Qe2 a6
9.Rd1 Bd7 10.Bf4 e5 11.Bg3 Nf6 12.Bh4 Bg4 13.Bxf6 Bxf6 14.Qe3 Nd4 15.Be2 Nc2 16.Qd2 Nxa1
17.Rxa1 0-0 18.Nd5 Be6 19.Bc4 Bxd5 20.Bxd5 Qb6 21.g4 Rac8 22.g5 Be7 23.h4 Kh8 24.Kg2 f5
25.gxf6 Bxf6 26.Ng5 Bxg5 27.hxg5 Qd4 28.Qe2 g6 29.Rd1 Qb6 30.Rd3 Rc5 31.a3 Qd8 32.Qg4 Rc2
33.Rf3 Kg7 34.b4 Rxf3 35.Kxf3 Qf8+ 0-1

[Event "Cvitanovic mem"]
[Site "Split"]
[Date "2004.05.01"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Zelic,Mladen"]
[Black "Pataki,Gyozo"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "B21"]
1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 dxc3 4.Nxc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 e6 6.Bc4 d6 7.0-0 Be7 8.Qe2 a6
9.Rd1 Bd7 10.Bf4 e5 11.Be3 Nf6 12.Nd5 Nxd5 13.Bxd5 0-0 14.b4 Nxb4 15.Bxb7 Bb5 16.Qd2 Rb8
17.Qxb4 Rxb7 18.a4 a5 19.Qb3 Bc6 20.Qc4 Bd7 21.Bd2 Qa8 22.Rdc1 Be6 23.Qc3 Ra7 24.Qd3 f6
25.Rab1 d5 26.exd5 Bxd5 27.Rb5 Rd8 28.Nh4 Bf7 29.Qe2 Ba3 30.Rcb1 Rc8 31.Be3 Rac7 32.Qg4 Rc4
33.Qh3 Qc6 0-1

The main theme of the above system is to delay the development of Nf6 until the appropriate moment. The moves e6, d6, a6, Bd7 and in particular Be7 are all played prior to Nf6 so as to minimise the impact of an eventual Bg5 and in many cases if white does get this move in, it is usually at the cost of at least two tempi. Some of the games listed above do not make full use of Black's most precise move order, nevertheless they give some indication as to what to expect in this line.

I would recommend you source a copy of Silman's book 'Winning With the Sicilian Defence' revised 2nd edition, therein he explains in great detail the ins and outs of the above system.

Adios

Top  Grin
  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
MNb
God Member
*****
Offline


Rudolf Spielmann forever

Posts: 10646
Location: Moengo
Joined: 01/05/04
Gender: Male
Re: Smith-Morra
Reply #30 - 07/31/04 at 09:01:03
Post Tools
Chandler: 1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.c3 Qa5 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.b4 Qc7 6.b5 Ne5 7.Nxe5 Qxe5 8.Qxd4
+=Makropoulos-Ljubojevic, Athena 1981.
Palkovi: 1.e4 c5 2.d4 cxd4 3.Nf3 Qa5+?! 4.c3 Nc6 (Nf6 5.e5 or dxc3 5.Nxc3) 5.Bc4 Nf6 6.Qe2
d6 7.h3 dxc3 8.Nxc3 e6 9.o-o Be7 10.Be3 o-o 11.a3 and b4 with the initiative.
Personally I do not like 7.h3 but according to P it is important to prevent Bg4.

  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
GC Lichtenberg
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 
Topic Tools
Bookmarks: del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Google+ Linked in reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Yahoo