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Normal Topic C51-C52: Evans Gambit (Read 5058 times)
Tzanidakis Michael
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Re: Evans Gambit
Reply #5 - 07/26/03 at 13:05:14
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Well I don't know how can I help you, as I posted most of the main variations and ideas on the Evans' Gambit,  but feel free to post or e-mail any question or opinion you may have. I assure you that i'm gonna answer as soon as I read it. Just in case you e-mail me make the subject clear such as CHESS or EVANS' GAMBIT because I receive daily tons of junk e-mails that I delete immediately without reading them Smiley
  
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Re: Evans Gambit
Reply #4 - 07/25/03 at 09:48:19
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Thank you again. As you can see, I am not a very good analysist. You are absolutely correct: Nxe5 is just playing blind to counter moves!
As you said, most people do not know how to react to the gambit which is one of the reasons that I found interest in the opening. Unfortunately, I don't really know how to react as black either and I think that knowledge alone would greatly improve my game as white! Your advice on relaxing and taking my time, no matter what my opponent plays, is very helpful. Unfortunately, the previous game that I mentioned (Nxb4) was a lightning game so I didn't quite have enough time to take!
I believe that my record of 2-0 with the Evans is due only in part to the "shock and awe" of my opponents!
I wish that I had some knowledge to offer you, but in this case you already possess the superior knowledge, so I do appologize.
If you don't mind, would you please continue to share your knowledge of the Evans? I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank You.
  

Terry-Isolated Pawn of the Game; Passed Pawn in Life!
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Tzanidakis Michael
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Re: Evans Gambit
Reply #3 - 07/25/03 at 05:01:03
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In your game 6.c3 was the right move as after 5..Nxb4 6.c3 Nc6 7.d4 exd4 8.cxd4 you return to the 5..Bc5 variation (which as I said I consider rediculus) attacking the bishop, having two strong center pawns and gaining more time. After 6.Nxe5?! d5! attacking both the bishop on c4 and the pawn on e4 and stopping the attack on f7, and black achieved equality as he opened with tempo his white-square bishop and freed his game. The movement d7-d5 is very important in every 1.e4 e5 variation as it frees black's game so white tries to provoke this move. Now the variation you presented in your original posting leads propably to the main variation (1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4 Bxb4 5.c3 Ba5 (or 5..Bc4 or 5..Be7 6.O-O (?!) Nf6! where black has solved their main problems) which Chigorin preferred but black is now able to castle. So instead of 6.O-O?! I play 6.d4 which gives white more space and black more choices. And as Lasker (I think) said "when you don't know what to play let your opponent decide. It is sure that he will make a mistake." The point is that you are tempting him to take on d4 losing more time and if he takes then you have the threat of e4-e5 adding pressure. You should focus on not to permit your opponent to castle or to delay it as much as possible while your are gaining time in development and better squares for your pieces. Remember you are playing a GAMBIT and material doesn't count that much. There is a variation in Evans' Gambit/Morphy Attack/Fraser-Mortimer Attack where you give a whole Bishop (sacrifice on f7) just to make black King to lose his right to castle Smiley And a tip: Never lose your courage if your opponent plays something that you didn't expect. Most people doesn't know how to respond to the Evans' Gambit and they are suprissed when they have to play against it. Hence they try to find the right moves and it is very possible to make a (slight or not) mistake. So next time you see the unexpected remember: relax and take your time! You will win many games that you thought you were losing.
  
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Re: Evans Gambit
Reply #2 - 07/24/03 at 23:59:56
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Thank you, T. Michael, you did indeed help! As I previously stated, I have had difficulty locating resources that offer much insight into the Evans, so I am deeply appreciative.
You did not comment on the slight variation that I presented in my original posting, so could I bother you with that? Does it create the possibilty for a much trickier game? Is it counter-productive to the whole purpose of gaining tempo? Does it really affect the game at all, whether positive or negative? Recently I was flipping through the pages of one of my books and I came upon a game-players anonymous-and it contained the exact move variation that I played, so I know someone else has done it before, but unfortunately the game was presented not to discuss opening theory, but to analyse a particular endgame setup.
On another note, I was lucky enough recently to get the chance to play the Evans again and though I did achieve victory, it was somewhat embarrasssing. See, instead of my opponent capturing with 5.Bxb4, he captured with 5.Nxb4 and because I was so shocked by the move, I continued as normal with 6.c3? But he just simply retreated with 6.Nc6. I later saw that I missed the chance for 6.Nxe5 and waging a double attack on f7! Do you see a better alternative to Nxe4?
Thanks again for your input!
  

Terry-Isolated Pawn of the Game; Passed Pawn in Life!
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Tzanidakis Michael
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Re: Evans Gambit
Reply #1 - 07/24/03 at 07:22:09
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You are really lucky i read this e-mail as I a great admiror of the Evans' Gambit and I can Solve you a lot of your questions:
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Bc5 4.b4!? Bxc4+ (declining it is worse) 5.c3. That is the purpose of Evans' Gambit. In the Guocio Pianno white couldn't build a strong centre because they needed one or two tempo thus you offer here a pawn to gain some time. Now I prefer 5..Ba5 as it controls the e1 square in many lines but 5..Be7 is also strong. I find 5..Bc4 ridiculous Wink so: 5..Ba5 6.d4 (chigorin preferred 6.o-o but after 6..Nf6 blck are ok). Now 6..d6 is Tartakover defense that you need to study as it is a bit tricky. If 6..exd4 I play 7.O-O. Now if black takes 7..bxc3 8.Qb3 is strong as 8..Qe7 9.Nc3 is powerful and 8..Qf6 9.d5! Qg6 leads to a complicated game. 7..Ne7 8.Ng5 d5 (not 0-0 9.Qh4 h6 10.Nxf7! Qe8 11.Nxh6++ Kh8 12.Nf7++ Kg8 13.Qh8#) 9.exd5 Ne5 10.Qxe4 is complicated but leads to a draw if you play it against Fritz Smiley You need a lot of practise and search but remember the double attack on f7 and b7 with Qb3 and the attack Ng5 and Qh4 are some ideas that you meet more ofteb than you imagine when you play the Evans' Gambit.
Hope I helped you Smiley
  
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C51-C52: Evans Gambit
07/02/03 at 13:17:57
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I've just recently began to take study into the Evans gambit. Unfortunately most of my resources are limited on explanation and/or analysis and are quite vague in what is offered. In fact, several software progams that I've used do not even reconize the opening! Instead, they only list it as the Giuco Piano!  
I tried what I do know of the opening lines in only one game and I thoroughly enjoyed the new direction that it offered. In that game, I did win but I believe that it had more to do with my opponent's lack of knowledge of the particular lines as well as the "surprise element" of its use!
Anyway, instead of playing 4.b4, as is apparently the norm, I played 4.o-o followed by 4...Nf6 5.b4.
I felt that castling before offering the pawn was much safer, but if anyone could offer any further insight into this decision and/or on the opening as a whole, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank You.
« Last Edit: 09/08/11 at 04:53:04 by Smyslov_Fan »  

Terry-Isolated Pawn of the Game; Passed Pawn in Life!
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