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Normal Topic KID Averbakh (Read 5703 times)
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Re: KID Averbakh
Reply #7 - 04/06/04 at 03:44:50
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Most Black players play lines with either ...Nc6 or ...Na6 against the Classical, so it has definitely limited Black's options there to commit to ...Nbd7 so early.  This is not to say that the ...Nbd7 lines are bad, of course, but they are not very popular.

I still don't really understand your problem, though.  If you don't want to meet (1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 Nbd7 6.Bg5) 6...e5 with 7.d5, but would prefer to retain some flexibility, then by all means play 7.Nf3, when 7...0-0 8.Qd2 leads back to your 8.Nf3 line (although frankly I think this is just inferior).

If I were White, by the way, I would be rather pleased if Black tried to manoeuvre around and play ....0-0-0 at some point.  True White often advances his kingside pawns in the Averbakh, but the idea of this is only very rarely to try and organise a mating attack.

The idea of the kingside pawn advance is to gain space, and ideally to block the kingside up altogether (e.g. if White plays g2-g4 and h2-h4-h5, and Black meets this with ...g6-g5), leaving White with a free hand to exploit his space advantage in the centre and on the queenside (which is down to his playing d4-d5).

Black often has to look for counterplay on the queenside with moves like ...c6, ...cxd5, ...Nd7-c5, ...Bd7, ...a5-a4 and ultimately ...b5.  To say that combining this with ...0-0-0 would be risky is an understatement!  the only problem from White's point of view is that it is so difficult for Black to organise this, that it is never going to happen!  Cheesy
  

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Re: KID Averbakh
Reply #6 - 04/05/04 at 14:44:53
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Well, I'm not saying 5...Nbd7 is great for Black, but it does seem to narrow white's options if I want to play an Averbakh! E.g. rather than 5.Be2 0-0 6.Bg5 Nbd7 7.Qd2 e5 8.d5, I might want to choose the old line 8.Nf3 - not terrifying for Black but also not an option for White after 5...Nbd7 6.Bg5 e5 7.d5. Also, 7...0-0 may well be Black's best move, but I'm not sure about this - once White has closed the centre, perhaps Black would like to delay castling and try something else. At the very least this would avoid some of the K-side pawn-storm plans for white, and perhaps Black might decide to manouvre and try an eventual ...0-0-0 or leaving the K in the centre.

I don't know if there's a downside due to premature development of the QN if white goes for a classical with 6.Nf3; if not, I wonder why more Black players don't play 5...Nbd7 as it seems to limit white's options in some lines (Averbakh and Exchange) without introducing any favourable options.
  
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Re: KID Averbakh
Reply #5 - 04/05/04 at 04:46:23
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Some Black players play this way to avoid the exchange variation with dxe5 and Qxd8.

I am not sure I understand why you would have any problem with this though.  After (1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.Be2 Nbd7 6.Bg5 e5) you simply play 7.d5, as you would normally in the Averbakh in response to Black's ...e5.  Has Black got anything better than 7...0-0 or 7...h6 8.Be3 0-0, transposing back to 'normal' Averbakh lines?
  

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Re: KID Averbakh
Reply #4 - 04/05/04 at 04:29:35
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Slightly off-topic, but about move orders  in the Averbakh:

After 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 my repertoire choice is the Averbakh starting with 5.Be2 (intending 5...0-0 6.Bg5 and if 6...Nbd7 7.Qd2). A recent opponent played 5...Nbd7 against which I didn't found any way to get a convincing advantage. Against 6.Bg5, Black doesn't need to transpose to the mainline with 6...0-0 but instead can try 6...e5 which I haven't been able to refute. Most games in my database proceed 5.Be2 Nbd7 6.Nf3, in which case white has renounced the Averbakh and is instead stuck in a Classical. As far as I'm aware the unusual line of the classical 6...0-0 is not too bad for Black.

I'm not usually a 1.d4 player so I might be missing something here, but is there a way for white to get a good edge against 5.Be2 Nbd7, or is this a clever way for Black to avoid the mainlines of the Averbakh?
  
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Re: KID Averbakh
Reply #3 - 09/15/03 at 03:27:38
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Certainly the idea of ...Qa5 and then ...Qa6 was the accepted recipe when I was a KID kid.
  

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IronMarshal
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Re: KID Averbakh
Reply #2 - 09/13/03 at 19:05:48
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Thank you! I'll mess around with that for awhile. Maybe run it on Chessmaster.
  
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Re: KID Averbakh
Reply #1 - 09/13/03 at 16:06:12
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11.Bxc5 has been tried a few times. I have seven games in my database, with the scores being even at three wins a piece. The main line seems to run 11...Qa5 12.b4 Qa6 and then either Rc1 or Bd4 when black takes the c4 pawn. After that it gets messy, but it seems that black has enough activity to get another pawn.

Ben Hague
  
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IronMarshal
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KID Averbakh
09/13/03 at 10:00:00
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I was playing through Joe Gallagher's Starting Out book looking at the tricky Averbakh variation and the first line in there is this one:
1. d4   Nf6,   2. c4  g6,    3. Nc3  Bg7,    4. e4  d6,   
5. Be2  O-O,  6. Bg5   c5,  7. d5 h6,   8. Bf4  e6!
9. dxe6 Bxe6,   10. Bxd6  Re8,   11. Nf3...
I was wondering what was wrong with 11. Bxc5? As I see it white is up two pawns and has a cramping bind type structure with c4 and e4. Black, meanwhile has a lead in development. I think that the two pawns far outweigh this lead in development.

If I were black, I would continue Na6 attacking the Bishop at c5. This would force another non-developing white move, and would link all of blacks heavy pieces on the back rank. I believe the white Bishop would be forced to e3 as a3 will be open to pressure.

As Black I would continue with Qa6 pinning the knight reate the threat of disrupting whites structure, and winning back at least one pawn. However, whites next move, Bd2, solidifys his position and he can effectively wriggle out of the tactical possiblities that exist for black.

Where am I wrong?      
  
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