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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) C47: The Belgrade Gambit (Read 105394 times)
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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #185 - 09/06/08 at 16:49:56
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OK now a view of the Belgrade Gambit from a wood pusher. I retired from USCF chess in the 1980s with a rating of 1700 (my career however included a draw with a very young Maxim Dlugy in 1980). Currently my ICC blitz rating is 1450 (I'm over 55 and even with a 5 second increment I often lose on time). However, I win 90% of BG games. At my level I almost never get into a prolonged theoretical discussion of the major lines. The most common response  by far is 5..Nxd5 and my oponents have no clue how to followup. The added bonus is that the 4 knights itself is a relatively uncommon opening nowadays so 1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Bc5 is quite common and after 4. NxP BxP+ I've done very well against stronger players as the 2 bishops usually overcome white's temporarily exposed king.

  
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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #184 - 08/30/08 at 14:18:49
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Indeed, White is in desparate need for something interesting after the sequence 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 exd4 5.Nd5 Be7 6.Bc4 0-0 7.0-0 d6 8.Nxd4 Nxd4 9.Qxd4 Nxd5 10.Bxd5 Bf6 11.Qd3 c6 12.Bb3 Be6!, particularly as this is being recommended by Marin in his repertoire book. Looking at the games in the various Belgrade gambit databases I come to the following analysis

13.c3

  • 13.Rd1 Bxb3 14.axb3 Re8 15.Qxd6 (15.c3 Qe7 16.Be3 a6 17.b4 Be5 18.g3 Qe6 19.Rd2 Qg4 20.f4 Bf6 with an equal position although 1-0 Van Bommel,T- Jelic,M/IECG email 2001 after various errors) 15...Qxd6 16.Rxd6 Rxe4 17.Be3 h6 18.c3 Bg5 19.Bxg5 hxg5 20.Kf1 Re7 21.f3 Rae8 22.b4 a6 23.Rad1 f6 24.Rd7 Kf7 ½-½ Kiss,A (2370)-Rogulj,B (2420)/Austria 1994
  • 13.Bxe6 fxe6 14.Qb3 Qd7 15.f4 Bd4+ 16.Kh1 Qf7 17.Bd2 d5 18.Bb4 c5 19.Ba3 b6 20.Qf3 Bf6 21.Rad1 Rad8 22.b4 cxb4 23.Bxb4 Rfe8 24.e5 Be7 25.Bxe7 Rxe7 26.Qd3 g6 27.g4 Qe8 28.Rf3 Qc6 29.Rdf1 ½-½ Bulgarini Torres,M (2373)- Brandhorst,W (2464)/Argentina 2000
  • 13.Bf4 Is another try to mix up things. In this case, Black can easily find equality. Bxb2! 14.Rab1 Qf6 15.Bxd6 Rfe8 16.Rfd1 ( 16.Rfe1 Bd4= ) 16...Bxb3 17.axb3 Rad8 18.f4 c5 19.e5 Bd4+= 20.Qxd4 cxd4 21.exf6 Rxd6 22.Ra1 a6 23.Ra4 Red8 24.fxg7 Kxg7 25.Kf2 b5 ½-½ Fruth,M- Marcotulli,G/ICCF corr 2000
  • 13.c4? a5 14.Bc2 g6 15.Bf4 Bxb2 16.Rab1 Be5 17.Bxe5 dxe5 18.Rxb7 Qxd3 19.Bxd3 Rfd8 20.Be2 Rd2 21.Re1 Rxa2 22.Rc7 a4 23.Rxc6 a3 24.Bf1 Rb2 25.Rd6 a2 26.Rdd1 Rab8 27.Bd3 Rd8 0-1 Lopez Pereyra,A (2140)-Cabrera,A (2502)/Sauzal 2004
13...Bxb3!

  • 13...Qe7? 14.Bc2 g6 15.f4 Rad8 ( 15...d5 16.e5 Bg7 17.f5 gxf5 18.g4 f6 19.gxf5 Bc8 20.e6 b6 21.Bf4 Kh8 22.Kf2 Qc5+ 23.Qe3 Qxe3+ 24.Bxe3 Ba6 25.Rg1 Rfe8 26.Rg4 Re7 27.Rag1 Rd8 28.Ba4 Bb7 29.b4 Rf8 30.c4 dxc4 31.Rxc4 1-0 Lutzenberger,R (2275)-Noakes,G (2119)/ IECG email 1998) 16.f5 Bc8 17.Be3 b6 18.Bb3 Be5 19.Rf3 Qh4 20.Rh3 Qe7 21.Rf1 d5 22.exd5 cxd5 23.Bc2 Rd6 24.Qd2 Re8 25.fxg6 hxg6 26.Rhf3 Rf6 27.Rxf6 Bxf6 28.Bf2 Qd8 29.Ba4 Bd7 30.Bxd7 Qxd7 31.Qd3 Qc6 32.Rd1 ½-½ Ruefenacht,M (2520)-Lopepe,P (2521)/ Argentina 1998
  • 13...d5?! 14.Rd1! maintains a minute plus. (Instead of 14.exd5 Bxd5 15.Be3 Bxb3 16.Qxd8 Bxd8 17.axb3 Bb6 18.Bxb6 and a draw was agreed in van Oosterom - Planta, corr 1982 ) 14...dxe4 15.Qxe4 Qe7 16.Be3 Rfd8 ( 16...a6 17.Bxe6 Qxe6 18.Qxe6 fxe6 19.Rd7 Rf7 20.Rd6 Re8 21.Rad1 += ) 17.Rxd8+ Rxd8 18.Bc2 g6 19.Bxa7 +=


14.axb3 Qe7 [ 14...Re8 15.Be3 a6 16.f3 ½-½ Bley,M (2328)-Muri,H (2343)/ICCF Email 2002 ] 15.Bf4 Rfe8 16.Bxd6 [ 16.Rfe1 Be5 17.Be3 a5 18.f4 Bf6 19.Bd4 ½-½ Simmelink,J (2341)-Koch,C (2222)/Chessfriend.com 2004 ] 16...Qxe4 17.Qxe4 Rxe4 18.Rfe1 Rae8 19.Rxe4 Rxe4 20.Kf1 a6 21.f3 Re6 22.Re1 Rxe1+ 23.Kxe1 Bd8 24.g4 g6 25.f4 f5 26.g5 Kf7 27.Ke2 Ke6 28.Bb8 Kd5 29.Kd3 c5 30.c4+ Kc6 31.Be5 ½-½ Gula,Joop J Domagala,Rudi Johannes Poland 2001
  
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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #183 - 06/28/08 at 02:08:39
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Schroeder wrote on 05/16/08 at 06:27:49:
I have recently added the Belgrade gambit to my White repertoire, and have been doing well so far (+4, =0, -0).

The most interesting one of these games was a correspondence game, where my opponent defended with 5.-Be7. The game seems to back the judgement of Craig Evans and Bruce Monson, namely that Black has by no means an easy equality.


[Event "Kais Maiturnier"]
[Site "www.schacharena.de"]
[Date "2008.05.05"]
[White "Schroeder, Christoph"]
[Black "Wizzard"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2222"]
[BlackElo "2050"]
[EventType "tourn (corr)"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "GER"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. d4 exd4 5. Nd5 Be7 6. Bc4 O-O 7. O-O d6 8. Nxd4 Nxd5 9. Bxd5 Nxd4 10. Qxd4 Bf6 11. Qd3 Qe7 12. c3 c6 13. Bb3 Be6 14. Bc2 g6 15. f4 Rad8 16. f5 Bc8 17. Bh6 Rfe8 18. Bb3 d5 19. exd5 cxd5 (19... Bxf5?! 20. Rxf5 gxf5 21. Qxf5 with compensation) 20. fxg6 hxg6 21. Qf3 Bg7 22. Bxg7 Kxg7 23. Rae1 Qc5+? (better 23... Be6 24. Qe3 +=) 24. Kh1 Be6 25. Rxe6! +- fxe6 26. Qf6+ Kh6 27. Rf3
1-0



Personally, I would have preferred the more ambitious 7...Nxe4, which I believe that I and others have discussed higher up in this thread.

However, in the game, I think that Black has very easy equality with 11...c6 12.Bb3 Be6.  For example, 13.Rd1 Bxb3 14.axb3 Re8 = was Kiss-Rogulj, Austria 1995.  Either White takes the d-pawn and enters an equal ending (which he did in the cited game), or he soon has to play f2-f3, after which Black puts his bishop on e5 (except that 15.f3 immediately would be met by 15...d5=+).  Black has other ways to play at move 11, for example 11...a5!?, and perhaps even 11...Qe7 is O.K., but I think that if White wants to claim an advantage, he must first of all prove something against Rogulj's line.

To me, these positions look so dry that a claim of White advantage is moderately preposterous.
  

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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #182 - 06/26/08 at 20:57:37
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Mihail Marin' book "Beating the Open Games" contains one chapter about the Belgrade Gambit. A free update on this book is now available:

http://www.qualitychessbooks.com/default.aspx
  
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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #181 - 05/16/08 at 06:27:49
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I have recently added the Belgrade gambit to my White repertoire, and have been doing well so far (+4, =0, -0).

The most interesting one of these games was a correspondence game, where my opponent defended with 5.-Be7. The game seems to back the judgement of Craig Evans and Bruce Monson, namely that Black has by no means an easy equality.


[Event "Kais Maiturnier"]
[Site "www.schacharena.de"]
[Date "2008.05.05"]
[White "Schroeder, Christoph"]
[Black "Wizzard"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2222"]
[BlackElo "2050"]
[EventType "tourn (corr)"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "GER"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. d4 exd4 5. Nd5 Be7 6. Bc4 O-O 7. O-O d6 8. Nxd4 Nxd5 9. Bxd5 Nxd4 10. Qxd4 Bf6 11. Qd3 Qe7 12. c3 c6 13. Bb3 Be6 14. Bc2 g6 15. f4 Rad8 16. f5 Bc8 17. Bh6 Rfe8 18. Bb3 d5 19. exd5 cxd5 (19... Bxf5?! 20. Rxf5 gxf5 21. Qxf5 with compensation) 20. fxg6 hxg6 21. Qf3 Bg7 22. Bxg7 Kxg7 23. Rae1 Qc5+? (better 23... Be6 24. Qe3 +=) 24. Kh1 Be6 25. Rxe6! +- fxe6 26. Qf6+ Kh6 27. Rf3
1-0

  
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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #180 - 04/07/08 at 14:58:45
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The "hidden" idea of 6...b5 for me is/was that I have something playable against 6.Bc4 and I know all the other lines (apart from 6.Bc4) are simply good for Black. But to be honest I am not eager to shoot moves like b5 on the board - I feel they are mostly dubios  Smiley
  
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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #179 - 04/07/08 at 12:27:45
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Markovich, in your line with the immediate 15...Rab8 it's in my inquisitive nature to probably just grab that pawn on c7 and ask where black's compensation is, given the reduced material. So 16.Qxc7 Rfc8 17.Qa5 and I'd ask, given that the Nd4 is presently stronger than the Bd7, and since white has no weaknesses to speak of, does black objectively have enough? Of course the open lines give practical compensation and white will have to be careful; but this just looks like a vastly improved version for white of some dragon lines, where all black's attacking pieces have been taken off the board and the Bd7 has been hemmed in. Then again, I'm a patzer and I've been known to be wrong very occasionally...  Wink

As for 6...b5 - I actually did look at this some years back for about 5 seconds, and my conclusion was that I'd probably cry if my opponent played it against me. I hope Bruce is still around (and, if so, that he might have a comment on this line), because I genuinely don't know how white should meet this idea - there certainly seems to be nothing wrong with it, and I'm an advocate of such ...b5 thrusts normally anyway.

I think I have to agree with the line given by Markovich, namely 7.Bxb5 Nb4 8.Bd3 Bb7 9.Bxe4 Bxd5 10.Bxd5 Qe7+ 11.Be3! Nxd5 12.Qxd4 Nxe3 13.fxe3 Qb4+ 14.c3! as possibly being white's best route; the endgame doesn't offer much but, I'd suggest, if anything white is better, though it looks more equal to me. 8...Nxf2!? is also worth a punt and also leads to a drawish endgame.

7.Qe2 might also be worth a try; 7...bxc4 8.Qxe4+ Be7 9.Bg5 f6 10.Bf4 O-O 11.O-O-O! Bd6 12.Bxd6 cxd6 13.Nxd4 and, despite the pawn defecit, I'd suggest that white is the only person with chances in the endgame. In fact, I think this is what I'd probably choose OTB - white must have a small edge here.
  

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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #178 - 04/05/08 at 02:42:45
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Matemax wrote on 04/04/08 at 13:13:15:
.1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 ed4 5.Nd5 Ne4 6.Bc4 b5



Well that is something that combines great originality with echoes of 19th Century anti-Evans ...b5 countergambits, and I salute you.  I have no idea of the ultimate merits, but on the surface, it looks pretty good.  I have no doubt, though, that Monson will come here with four pages of variations and citations to show that he thought of this in 1972.

For what it's worth, 7.Bxb5 Nb4 8.Bd3 may be best.  White is still in business, isn't he?  But on second thought, 8...Bb7 9.Bxe4 Bxd5 10.Bxd5 Qe7+ 11.Kf1 (11.Kd2!? g6 as recommended by silicon; but 11.Be3 Nxd5 12.Qxd4 Nxe3 13.fxe3 Qb4+ may be +=) 11...Nxd4 12.Qxd4 Qc5 just may be adequate.
  

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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #177 - 04/04/08 at 13:13:15
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I'de like to give a slightly strange idea I had after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 ed4 5.Nd5 Ne4 6.Bc4:


* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
*

I cant find any games (chesslive.de) - but perhaps someone knows better?

The ideas behind this weird move 6...b5:

- distract Bc4
- make a square for the Bc8
- prepare attack on whites pieces (with Nb4 threatening c6)
- taking the initiative with Black

Some variations which need critical thoughts from the community:


6...b5 

1) 7.Bxb5 Nb4 8.Qe2 Nxd5 9.Qxe4+ Qe7 10.Qxe7+ Bxe7 11.Nxd4 O-O 12.O-O Bf6

2) 7.Bd3 Nc5 8.Qe2+ (8.Bxb5 Ne6) 8....Ne7 9.Bg5 Bb7

3) 7.Bb3 Bd6 8.Nxd4 (8.O-O O-O 9.Nxd4 Be5 10.Nxb5) 8...Qh4 9.Be3 Nxd4 10.Qxd4 O-O

4) 7.Qe2 bxc4 8.Qxe4+ Be7 9.Bg5 f6 10.Bf4 O-O 11.Bxc7 Bb4+ 12.Nxb4 Qe8

Just some variations no evaluations at the moment  Wink
  
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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #176 - 04/03/08 at 19:08:56
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CraigEvans wrote on 04/03/08 at 16:32:38:
11...O-O 12.Nxd4 Bd7 13.Qf3 Qe8 14.Bxe7 (otherwise a future ...Nd5 will be strong) Qxe7 15.Qxb7 e5 16.Nb3 - black might have a bit of an initiative but I can't see it being more than equal, and (clutching at straws) maybe white can get something in the endgame.


Thanks for being so forthcoming.  I didn't look much at 15...e5 though, since it looked to me like 15...Rab8 was stronger, after which I would rather be Black.

CraigEvans wrote on 04/03/08 at 16:32:38:
Or alternatively 14.Qxb7 Nd5 (or 14...f6 15.Bd2 Nd5 16.Rhe1) 15.Rhe1 f6 16.Bd2 Rb8 17.Qa6 which again doesn't look more than equal, but again in truth black probably is likely to have more fun.


To me, these lines seem to leave Black with quite good chances (I was going to say with compensation for his pawn, but I realized that he isn't down a pawn unless White dares to take a second queenside pawn).  If this is true then I'll have to disagree with TopNotch that  6...Nxe4 isn't a good move.  This also implies that besides 5...Be7, 5...Nxe4 is a good move, which has always been my belief.
  

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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #175 - 04/03/08 at 16:32:38
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Matemax wrote on 04/03/08 at 12:17:25:
Quote:
5...Nxe4
This is rarely played, and sensibly so - it is extremely difficult for black to hold the position. I don't know the critical lines that well, so I wont attempt any analysis of these lines yet.

Perhaps I missed something in the past 12 pages - but I want to mention Yearbook 64, page 131: "A fundamental test of the Belgrade Gambit" - especially the game Abarran-Parnenzini:
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 ed4 5.Nd5 Ne4 6.Qe2 f5 7.Ng5 d3 8.cd3 Nd4 9.Qh5 g6 10.Qh4 c6 11.de4 cd5 12.ed5 Bg7 13.Kd1 h6 14.Nf3 Qh4 14.Nh4 Kf7 15.Be3 (15.Bd3 b5) f4 17.Bd4 Bd4 18.Bd3 Rg8 =+ according to the article

Furthermore one can read in the introduction:
7.Bg5 Ne7!? 8.Ne5 (Monson) c6!

Someone enlighten me please?


The point, Matemax, is that white plays 6.Bc4 and avoids the old main line altogether. After 6...Be7 7.Qe2 then we're back into this convo. Wink

Yep Markovich, I think 11...O-O is probably the critical try - certainly black's more popular tries, 11...c5 and 11...c6 seem to give white great play. It doesn't seem like white gets too much from 12.Rxd4 Qe8, therefore 12.Nxd4 looks the only try; whilst I'm not normally a pawngrabber in front of my own king, white may have to acquiesce to 12...Bd7 13.Qf3 Qe8 14.Bxe7 (otherwise a future ...Nd5 will be strong) Qxe7 15.Qxb7 e5 16.Nb3 - black might have a bit of an initiative but I can't see it being more than equal, and (clutching at straws) maybe white can get something in the endgame. Or alternatively 14.Qxb7 Nd5 (or 14...f6 15.Bd2 Nd5 16.Rhe1) 15.Rhe1 f6 16.Bd2 Rb8 17.Qa6 which again doesn't look more than equal, but again in truth black probably is likely to have more fun.

As for 7...d6, whilst it may not be "advantage", I wouldn't call it "comfortable equality for black", either. The line 8.Nxd4 Nxd5 9.Bxd5 Nxd4 10.Qxd4 Bf6 11.Qd3, as previously discussed, gives a position rich in possibilities and where I've scored highly as white - the difficulty in dislodging the Bd5 without weakening d6, and white's plan of f4-f5 or f4 and e5 can be very difficult to counter. Equal - maybe. Comfortable - definitely not.

The other move is 8...Ne5, which I can't profess to be an expert on - however, Topnotch and Bruce had a long discussion on this around pages 4-7 with a lot of inventive lines for both colours - if you can't locate it then I'll again dig out my old notes.
  

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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #174 - 04/03/08 at 15:43:13
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Craig, somehow I must have managed to edit my post to eliminate my intended reference to your linked game, which is what I was referring to.  Nice game, by the way.  But unlike TopNotch, I don't want to give up on 6...Nxe4 just yet.  For one thing, this same position can be obtained from 5...Nxe4 6.Bc4 Be7, and I had been under the impression that 6...Be7 was correct in that sequence.  So this concession would also concede that 5...Nxe4 isn't a strong move, whereas I think it is.

I meant 7.Qe2 Nc5 8.Bg5 Ne6 9.Nxe7 Nxe7 10.Bxe6 dxe6 11.0-0-0 and now how about 11...0-0, intending 12.Nxd4 Bd7, and if 13.Qf3 then 13...Qe8. 

Concerning ...d6, would you be good enough to post what you consider to be White's continuation leading to advantage?  I really was not aware that anything like that had been claimed here.  Perhaps I've forgotten.

Matemax, not 6.Qe2 but 6.Bc4 is considered critical.
  

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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #173 - 04/03/08 at 12:17:25
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Quote:
5...Nxe4
This is rarely played, and sensibly so - it is extremely difficult for black to hold the position. I don't know the critical lines that well, so I wont attempt any analysis of these lines yet.

Perhaps I missed something in the past 12 pages - but I want to mention Yearbook 64, page 131: "A fundamental test of the Belgrade Gambit" - especially the game Abarran-Parnenzini:
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 ed4 5.Nd5 Ne4 6.Qe2 f5 7.Ng5 d3 8.cd3 Nd4 9.Qh5 g6 10.Qh4 c6 11.de4 cd5 12.ed5 Bg7 13.Kd1 h6 14.Nf3 Qh4 14.Nh4 Kf7 15.Be3 (15.Bd3 b5) f4 17.Bd4 Bd4 18.Bd3 Rg8 =+ according to the article

Furthermore one can read in the introduction:
7.Bg5 Ne7!? 8.Ne5 (Monson) c6!

Someone enlighten me please?
  
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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #172 - 04/03/08 at 12:05:11
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Ahh, it's good to see TopNotch back in the room - despite the apparent disagreements we have had I always enjoy his posts (and, contrary to public opinion, I do enjoy the opinions of strong players, even if they don't always buy into my particular feelings on chess).

Firstly, with reference to Markovich - well, I was always useless at languages, so I'll accept the correction.  Wink
With regards to the proposed line - which line are you playing 11...O-O in exactly? For reference I would meet 5...Be7 with 6.Bc4 and therefore I'm not sure where you'd get to 11...O-O from (since black would usually castle now or next move).

It's nice to see that Toppy agrees with 7.Qe2 being a strong move; it should be noted however that this not only means that 5...Be7 6.Bc4 Nxe4?! is dubious, but also casts some fresh doubts on 5...Nxe4 also - after 6.Bc4 black has nothing better than 6...Be7 (Monson does a good job of smashing up the alternatives in his book; 6...Bb4+ is probably black's only other try but it's a little hairy and I think white gets plenty of play after 7.c3).

With the 5...Be7 6.Bc4 O-O move-order, I'll have to wait until I get home to check my analysis - it's certainly probably the most challenging line after 5...Be7. As for "comfortable equality" after 5...Be7 6.Bc4 O-O 7.O-O d6, I suppose we'll have to agree to disagree on that one. There's plenty of analysis on here to support both sides and, one thing which can't be argued with (whether the position is equal or not) is that there is plenty of scope for outplaying an opponent with either white or black here - as has been said many times, "equal" and "drawn" are two separate things, and I've had good success with the white side of these lines.

I am interested in how you play the position in the Bogo line after 6...Qe7, also - I'll have to look up the relevant thread on here this evening, but certainly I've never had any problems in these lines.

Most of my chess is predicated on psychology, bluff and luck, and it's serving me well so far; I think I'll stick with what I know. You can't teach an old dog new tricks, and you can't teach a patzer good chess.  Grin

Regards,
Craig
  

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Re: The Belgrade Gambit
Reply #171 - 04/03/08 at 03:25:04
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CraigEvans wrote on 04/02/08 at 10:46:45:
I'd missed the last few posts on this where 4...Bb4 is discussed - I know it's not "strictly" a Belgrade but it is a feasible anti-Belgrade option. Sadly I'm not subscribed to this section (hope to change that soon), but what was Renet's assessment of the line? I've certainly scored close to 100% after 5.Nxe5 and was just under the impression that black gets a worse game in pretty much every line?

With regards to the Belgrade proper, I've certainly scored highly with the Trakjovic line, though sadly managed to refute Bruce's suggestion in his (otherwise fantastic) work on the opening - the exchange sacrifice in the line 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 exd4 5.Nd5 Be7 6.Bc4 Nxe4 7.O-O O-O 8.Re1 Nf6 9.Rxe7?! Nxe7 10.Nxf6+ gxf6 just doesn't quite hold up to close scrutiny. However, I think 7.Qe2! (the aforementioned Gutman Variation) causes black some huge problems, and again I've scored 100% with this line; http://team4545league.org/pgnplayer/pgnplayer.php?ID=5910&Board=2 is a game I played on ICC's team4545 league where I basically won a game from preparation alone - having reached the position after 15...e5 in a previous game I'd analysed afterwards and found the crushing 16.Nxe5! move (which I missed first time around), and therefore didn't really have to think until the endgame.

Now, if 5...Be7 is such a good equaliser, black either needs a serious improvement in the above game after 7.Qe2, or needs to accept that actually ...Nxe4 is too dangerous and therefore play into the quieter waters of perhaps 6...d6 (which was discussed previously, at great length, with some fantastic variations from both TopNotch and Bruce; as far as I'm aware black was struggling to find equality in those lines too).

My gut feeling, along with my practical experience, is that 5...Nb4 is the only really critical move, after which black gets at least equality. 6.Nxd4 Nxe4 7.Nf5?, as pointed out by Monson, is weak (I won a 4NCL game in 9 moves as black in this line - the amusing continuation was 7...c6 8.Nxg7+?? (lovely tactical idea, but...) Bxg7 9.Nxb4 Qe7 (oops!)0-1), and therefore 7.Nb5 has to be tried, in which white seems to get enough play (but black's chances certainly aren't worse).

The longer books keep on recommending 5...Be7 for black, the longer I'll be playing this as white! Viva les Belgrade!  Cheesy


Dan Heisman is always raving about the team 45/45 league on his ICC radio show.

Too tired to get into specifics right now, so just a few quick bullet points that maybe developed later.

A) 6...Nxe4 is a very rare move and it seems that after 7.Qe2 it will remain that way.

B) 6...0-0 7.0-0 Nxe4 is the way to go if Black is feeling frisky and wants to punish White.

C) 6...0-0 7.0-0 d6 is comfortable equality for Black, despite your indirect claims that Monson proved otherwise in this thread.

D) I think 5...Nb4 is ok for Black and maybe more depending on the correct evaluation of 6.Nxd4 Nxe4 7.Nb5 Nxd5 8.Qxd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Bf4 d6 11.0-0-0 Kxc7 which I have never really analysed seriously, since Black has comfortable options that offer chances to outplay the opponent with significantly less risk.

E) I also like and play 4...Bb4 5.Nxe5 Bxc3 6.bxc3 Qe7, which is not to avoid the Belgrade Gambit but rather to avoid some of the stale positions arising out of 4...exd4 5.Nxd4.

Good luck in your future adventures with the Belgrade Gambit, you will need it.

Toppy Smiley


  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
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