Latest Updates:
Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Palliser's Tango Book (Read 32287 times)
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #57 - 08/14/05 at 13:16:36
Post Tools
I can't speak for 'Mr Pallister', but the articles I wrote should be appearing shortly (I hope!) as they're all written and with the editors. Check out for news on John Cox's book too (for beating the annoying d-pawn deviations) on the d-pawn various section.
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Franck Steenbekkers
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #56 - 08/13/05 at 12:11:44
Post Tools
I have a question for mr.Pallister.
Are you writing the art. about the subsystems you wrote a couple of week's ago.
I think you planned to publish this in Chess MOnthly

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
TopNotch
God Member
*****
Offline


I only look 1 move ahead,
but its always the best

Posts: 1968
Joined: 01/04/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #55 - 08/03/05 at 19:05:38
Post Tools
Ive been checking in on this thread from time to time, and must say that I am impressed by the level of enthusiasm for this book. Grin

So impressed in fact that I am toying with the idea of acquiring it, but first a query. I have a booklet by the Tango's pioneer Georgi Orlov and was wondering if anyone had this in addition to Palliser's work, and if so how do they compare.

In the Orlov work, he expressed some concerns in a couple lines that may or may not prove problematic for Black. One of them was already discussed here, namely 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nc3 e5 4.d5 Ne7 5.e4 Ng6 6.h4! h5 7.Bg5. I will have to dig up the manuscript to isolate the other, after which I will post it here.

I hope any potential problems prove minor, as its always nice to have a second string in ones bow when facing 1.d4.

Topperts Grin
  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
JN
Junior Member
**
Offline



Posts: 56
Joined: 12/11/04
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #54 - 08/03/05 at 02:53:55
Post Tools
Palliser only gives a short note on 3.Nf3 d6. 3. - d6 seems to avoid masses of theory. Where can I find more on this line?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Geof_Strayer
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline



Posts: 39
Location: Los_Angeles
Joined: 04/08/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #53 - 07/30/05 at 10:19:14
Post Tools
I bought this book, although not because I was looking for a new defense to 1.d4 (I am pretty loyal to the QGD, with the Dutch as a 2nd option when I am in the right mood).  But I play queen pawn openings with White and I often begin the game with 1.d4 and 2.c4, so I figured I could use the book to come up with a couple of promising lines against the Tango for White.  Also, I thought Mr. Palliser's "Play 1.d4!" book was quite good, so I figured this book focusing on much lesser-known lines might be interesting.

I have spent some hours now looking at the book and doing research on the databases, and I have finally decided on the lines I will play against it as White (although they are not the killer lines I was hoping to find).  Based on the lines I have looked at, the Black Knights Tango seems much more playable than I previously thought.  For some reason I was under the impression that the Tango was one of those openings that you could use only occasionally at the master level for surprise value, or perhaps against substantially weaker opponents.  But after looking at this book, I am starting to become resigned to the probability that the Tango is relatively sound and constitutes another opening which is sufficiently playable to serve as a main defense to 1.d4, and where the level of White's realistic ambition may be a slight advantage out of the opening.

Anyway, another fine book from Mr. Palliser, IMO.  Perhaps even more impressive than his previous book since he is traversing relatively unexplored territory here.  Interesting enough that I actually spent time looking at some chapters that I never had any intention of playing from the White side just out of curiousity.  I must admit that my early chess self-education somewhat biases me against such openings ("knights before bishops" is fine, but "knights before pawns" seems a bit much!), but I think this book makes a strong case that White's best approach may be transposing in to a Qc2 NimzoIndian Zurich Variation where Black's position seems quite reliable and where, in a number of variations, Black's lead in development even provides some attacking chances.




  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #52 - 07/22/05 at 06:00:42
Post Tools
Thanks for those games Zarvox.
Perhaps the elite could find something against it,  but then also find ways to keep the black position going! Maybe next time there's a FIDE k/o Bologan will return to the Tango fold...let's hope so!
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
lnn2
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 1503
Location: nc
Joined: 09/22/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #51 - 07/21/05 at 08:45:42
Post Tools
Richard's book finally arrived  Cheesy

I play 1. d4 as white, and was a little sceptical about this whole Tango business (if it was so good, why isn't it more popular?). My main concern was 3. Nf3 e6 4. a3, where i didn't think Black was okay in the KID positions, I bought this book mainly for the zurich nimzo coverage. 

But after going through this book, must say black has many interesting resources. I do have a nagging suspicion that if the world elite turns their attention to the Tango, its defects might start to show... but right now a specialist can expect to score well. At lower levels, a casual player merely acquainted with typical themes can expect to rack up a nice plus score.

The best part of the book is Richard's nice explanations of typical plans and positions. In fact, his explanations in this book are even better at starting out a novice, than many other titles in the Starting Out series!

Overall a great effort from Richard, at least on par with his Play 1. d4!, which like another poster, I'm still finding good stuff in it after so long.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #50 - 07/19/05 at 19:03:38
Post Tools
Here, by the way, are Nakamura's two (long) games with the Tango at the World Open:

[Event "World Open"]
[Site "Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA"]
[Date "2005.07.03"]
[White "GM_Kacheishvili"]
[Black "GM_Nakamura"]
[Result "0-1"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 e6 4. Nc3 Bb4 5. Qc2 d6 6. a3 Bxc3+ 7. Qxc3 a5 8.
b3 h6 9. g3 O-O 10. Bg2 Re8 11. O-O e5 12. dxe5 dxe5 13. Bb2 Bg4 14. h3 Bh5
15. Qe3 Qe7 16. Rad1 Nd7 17. Nh4 Rad8 18. Nf5 Qf8 19. g4 Bg6 20. Ng3 Nd4 21.
Bxb7 Nc5 22. Bd5 c6 23. Bg2 Bc2 24. Rc1 Bxb3 25. Bc3 Nc2 26. Qf3 e4 27. Qf5
Nd4 28. Qf4 Nce6 29. Qxe4 Qxa3 30. Ra1 Ba2 31. Qb1 Qxc3 32. Qxa2 Nf4 33. e3
Nxg2 34. Kxg2 Nc2 35. Qxa5 Qd2 36. Qxd2 Rxd2 37. Kf3 Nxa1 38. Rxa1 Rc2 39.
Ra4 Re6 40. Ne4 c5 41. Ra5 Rxc4 42. Nxc5 Rf6+ 43. Kg3 Rd6 44. Kf3 Rd5 45.
Nb3 Rxa5 46. Nxa5 Rc3 47. Nb7 Kf8 48. Nd6 Ke7 49. Nf5+ Kf6 50. Ng3 Rc2 51.
h4 g6 52. g5+ hxg5 53. Ne4+ Kf5 54. Nxg5 Rc7 55. Kg3 Ra7 56. Kf3 Kf6 57.
Ne4+ Kg7 58. Ng5 Kh6 59. Kg3 Kg7 60. Kh3 Ra4 61. Kg3 Ra7 62. Kg4 Rb7 63. Kf4
Kg8 64. Kg4 Kf8 65. Kf4 Ke7 66. Kg4 Rb4+ 67. Kg3 Kf6 68. Kh3 Rb7 69. Kg4 Ke5
70. Kf3 Kd5 71. Kg4 Ke5 72. Kf3 Ra7 73. Kg3 Kd5 74. Kg4 f5+ 75. Kg3 Ra4 76.
f3 Ke5 77. Nh3 Ra3 78. Nf4 Kf6 79. Kf2 Kg7 80. Nd5 Kh6 81. Nf4 Ra6 82. Kg3
Ra2 83. Kh3 Ra3 84. Ng2 Kg7 85. Kg3 Kf6 86. Kf4 Rb3 87. Kg3 Kg7 88. Kh3 Kf7
89. Kg3 Ra3 90. Kf4 Ra2 91. Kg3 Re2 92. Kh3 Ke8 93. Kg3 Kd7 94. Kh3 Kd6 95.
Kg3 Ke5 96. Kh3 Kf6 97. Kg3 Kf7 98. Kh3 Rf2 99. Kg3 Rf1 100. Nf4 Rh1 101.
Ng2 Ke7 102. Nf4 Kf7 103. Ng2 Ra1 104. Nf4 Ra6 105. Ng2 Ke6 106. Kf4 Ra1
107. Kg3 Kd5 108. Nf4+ Kc4 109. Nxg6 Rg1+ 110. Kf4 Rxg6 111. h5 Rh6 112. Kg5
Rh8 113. h6 Kd3 114. Kxf5 Rxh6 115. f4 Ra6 {Black wins} 0-1

[Event "World Open"]
[Site "Philadelphia, Pennsylvania USA"]
[Date "2005.07.04"]
[Round "?"]
[White "GM_Miton"]
[Black "GM_Nakamura"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 e6 4. g3 d5 5. Bg2 dxc4 6. Qa4 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 Nd5 8.
Bxb4 Nxb4 9. O-O Rb8 10. Na3 O-O 11. Qb5 b6 12. Qxc4 Ba6 13. Nb5 Qd5 14.
Qxd5 exd5 15. Nc3 Rfe8 16. Rfd1 Ne7 17. Rac1 Rbd8 18. a3 Nbc6 19. e3 Nb8 20.
b4 c6 21. a4 Bb7 22. Ne5 Nd7 23. Nxd7 Rxd7 24. a5 b5 25. f3 f5 26. Kf2 Red8
27. Ne2 Nc8 28. Nf4 Re7 29. Nd3 Nd6 30. Ne5 Nc4 31. f4 Rd6 32. h4 g6 33. Bf3
Bc8 34. Rh1 h6 35. Rh2 Rg7 36. Rhh1 Kf8 37. Rh2 Rf6 38. Rhh1 Ke7 39. Rh2 Kd8
40. Rhh1 Kc7 41. Rh2 Be6 42. Ra1 Rff7 43. Rc1 Rf8 44. Rc2 Re8 45. Rc1 Rd8
46. Rhh1 Bd7 47. Rhd1 Bc8 48. Rd3 a6 49. Rdd1 Bb7 50. Rd3 Rd6 51. Ra1 Re6
52. Rdd1 Re8 53. Rh1 Bc8 54. Rad1 Bb7 55. Ra1 Reg8 56. Rh2 Bc8 57. Rd1 Bd7
58. Ra1 Be8 59. Rah1 Bd7 60. Rd1 Bc8 61. Rdh1 Bb7 62. Rd1 Kb8 63. Rhh1 Re8
64. Rd3 Ka7 65. Rdd1 c5 66. dxc5 Nxe5 67. fxe5 Rxe5 68. Rd3 Kb8 69. Rhd1 Rd7
70. Rd4 Kc7 71. Rc1 Bc6 72. Rcd1 Kd8 73. Bg2 Ke7 74. Bf3 Kf6 75. Bg2 Rde7
76. R1d3 Ke6 77. Rd1 Rd7 78. R1d2 Ke7 79. Rd1 Kd8 80. R1d2 Kc7 81. Rd1 Bb7
82. Bf3 Rd8 83. Bg2 Kc6 84. Bf3 Bc8 85. R4d3 Be6 86. Rd4 Bf7 87. R4d3 Rf8
88. Rd4 Be6 89. Bg2 g5 90. hxg5 hxg5 91. Rh1 Rf7 92. Rh6 Re7 93. Rg6 g4 94.
Rh6 Kc7 95. Rd3 Kb8 96. Rh8+ Kc7 {Game drawn} 1/2-1/2

His opponent in the 2nd game won the tournament, incidentally.

Richard, thanks for suggesting the Alekhine. I was already thinking of making the Alekhine my 1e4 defense, it's just that I don't know it well yet, and was concerned about whether there is enough counterplay in the exchange variation.

As for articles on the Tango in US magazines, I certainly haven't seen any in many years.

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #49 - 07/19/05 at 04:08:30
Post Tools
Thanks, Bill. Typical Nakamura indeed, as was his win against Palo which we've given on here! Please tell me have there been any recent articles on the Tango in US magazines (I've seen Joel's excellent introductory stuff on www.jeremysilman.com)?
1 e4 - surely the Alekhine compliments the Tango well and John Cox is the man to follow there?
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #48 - 07/15/05 at 11:23:06
Post Tools
So Richard, are you planning a defense to 1. e4 book to complement the Tango and Play 1. d4 books?

I saw U.S. Champion Nakamura playing the Tango in the World Open recently (I watched some of the game on ICC). He won in over 100 moves, which is pretty typical for Nakamura.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bill Calton
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #47 - 07/14/05 at 18:48:19
Post Tools
I am checking in late to this thread.  I must confess I have not read all the back and forth here.  But I wanted to weigh in on what an absolutely great book the Tango is.  BUY IT NOW!

I bought Palliser's Tango! earlier this week.  The opening is perfect for me -- strategical, not too much theory, fundamentally sound, yet slightly offbeat and not fully respected.  I can hardly put the book down, and can't wait to adopt this as my new answer to d4.

I think the layout worked well -- strategic examples at the front of each chapter, followed by the theory (ni game fragments, no full games).  Richard's explanations are great, and it appears that he has added plenty of his own ideas and conclusions to speficic lines as well.

I should add that Palliser writing is excellent.  I also loved his earlier work Play 1d4.  There is so much content packed into that book, that I am still trying to absorb it 1.5 years later.  (the tango is indeed obscure.  his recomendation for white vs. the tango is quite brief, and probably thoeretically not too challenging to black as well.  go tango.)  Nevertheless, Palliser is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Willempie
God Member
*****
Offline


I love ChessPublishing
.com!

Posts: 4312
Location: Holland
Joined: 01/07/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #46 - 07/11/05 at 10:04:04
Post Tools
Richard, you may like to hear that Hansen at chesscafe.com gave you 5/5. Smiley
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #45 - 06/21/05 at 04:01:49
Post Tools
Just to shamelessly point out for UK readers that the Tango is now retailing from Chess & Bridge and presumably other UK outlets.
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #44 - 06/11/05 at 05:12:28
Post Tools
Yes, good points - I've certainly 'tricked' a few KhalifmanKramnikites with 1Nf3 Nf6 2 c4 Nc6 - they usually go 3 d4 as by playing 1 Nf3 they're often trying to avoid 1 c4 et English lines.
That's a common trap too; it's curious though as to why Bd3 and Nge2 is quite so popular here as it's not hugely popular in the KID! Samisch KID players do meanwhile often opt for 6 Be3 - I guess that when surprised by  the Tango, White players head for familiar set-ups; well for the white pieces perhaps, just not the black ones!
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #43 - 06/09/05 at 02:04:33
Post Tools
roastednuts - Thanks, that makes sense. It's actually a strength of the Tango that there are often 2 such excellent choices of development for the king's bishop.

I've been playing lots of blitz games with the Tango, and 3. Nc3 seems most common. The positions after 3...e5 are fun to play and usually White doesn't have much idea of what to do. I have already gotten the following trap twice!

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5 4. d5 Ne7 5. e4 Ng6 6. Bd3 Bc5 7. Nge2?? Ng4! 8. O-O Qh4 9. h3 Nxf2 10. Rxf2 Qxf2+ 11. Kh2 (Kh1 is better but still horrible) d6 (Nh4 is even better) 12. Bd2 Bxh3

Now one game continued 13. Kxh3 Qh4#, while the other went 13. Qh1 Bg4 14.
Be1 Qe3 15. Rd1 Qh6+ 0-1.

Those were just blitz games, but still a good example of how easily White can get in trouble in this variation. I think it's much better for White to play 6. Be3 here.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
fluffy
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #42 - 06/08/05 at 20:35:01
Post Tools
Richard. I look forward to receiving this book. I have often had trouble constructing a Nimzo repetoire. The Nimzo is quite sound and interesting, and the idea of 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nc6!? with a Tango is rather interesting. I am ordering the book for its Nimzo coverage more than its pure Tango lines. I think it may give some ideas for countering 1.c4 and 1.Nf3 as well.  I think 1.d4 Nf6 2.Bg5 e6! and 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bg5 h6! is the right idea...
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #41 - 06/08/05 at 18:21:26
Post Tools
Fluffy - thanks for your kind words. Yes - sorry - forgot that was the original title/aim, but space...
Likewise I didn't always cover both options at a ...Bc5/...Bb4 juncture, but in many of those lines - apart from when obvious like 6 Be3 - both are quite playable.  Plenty of room for personal taste and creativity just like there should be in the Tango!
In case of any interest I'm doing a (probably six part) series on meeting 1 d4 variouses for Chess Monthly; starting July/August. That will just be for 2...e6 players and so will cover the Tromp/Torre/BDG/London/Colle and 3 g3 - for the latter 3...b5 still looked promising last time I looked? Didn't Anand succesfully use it against Lautier; Corsica 2004 or am I mixing lines?
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
roastednuts
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I love ChessPublishing
.com!

Posts: 17
Location: Gilbert
Joined: 05/26/05
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #40 - 06/08/05 at 18:04:30
Post Tools
Hey Zarvox,
I took a look at your problem about whether to prefer Bc5 or Bb4 and this is what I came up with. I've only read the first chapter and a half, so my advice is only for the classical development and dynamic development chapters. When white develops classically then black should play Bc5, but of course if white stops Bc5 with Be3 then black should play Bb4. If white develops dynamically then the bishop should come to b4 because white is attempting to slow black down on the kingside so black should try to give white doubled c-pawns to slow him down. Although I haven't looked at the lunge lines yet, it would make since to put the Bishop on b4 as it puts more pressure on white's center there. I hope this helped.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #39 - 06/08/05 at 15:47:10
Post Tools
Good point, Foghorn. In any case, it's clear that this is a book about the Tango, not a book about every possible deviation White has to avoid the Tango. So please, let's get back to discussing the Tango!

One issue I've noticed is that there are many variations of the Tango where both ...Bc5 and ...Bb4 look good. Can anyone give any insights for which to prefer if such cases? Obviously it depends on the specific position, but still I'm interested in thoughts on this.

For example, I had a blitz game today that went 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6 3. d5 Ne5 4. Nc3 e6 5. e4, and I was unsure whether Bc5 or Bb4 was better. Any ideas?

When I looked it up in Richard's book, he analyzes Bb4 here but says Bc5 is interesting... it's not at all clear to me which is preferable.

In the game, I played 5...Bc5, and then White got into trouble quickly because of 6. Nf3 Neg4 7. Nd4 e5! (probably 6. Nf3 was already a mistake because of this, but I'm not sure what White's best is here).

Any thoughts on whether Bc5 or Bb4 is stronger here, or ideas in general?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Foghorn
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline



Posts: 39
Location: Dallas
Joined: 03/21/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #38 - 06/08/05 at 14:32:19
Post Tools
@ fluffy:  The book was indeed advertised with the phrase "A Complete Defense to 1d4" in the title.  However, I have just received my copy and the title has been changed to "Tango! a dynamic answer to 1d4," so the title is not misleading.  It looks great, the coverage of the Zurich Nimzo alone is worth the price!
  

Every solution has, embedded within it, the next major problem.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
fluffy
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #37 - 06/08/05 at 13:43:11
Post Tools
Ah, maybe someone mentioned Prie's coverage of it. For the record, I really like Palliser's 1.d4!, and not only beccause he has a couple of my game references in it... Smiley
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
roastednuts
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I love ChessPublishing
.com!

Posts: 17
Location: Gilbert
Joined: 05/26/05
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #36 - 06/08/05 at 11:37:35
Post Tools
Just for clarification Richard does not cover 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.Bg5. He sticks to only Tango lines.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
fluffy
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #35 - 06/08/05 at 10:56:12
Post Tools
roasted-
I am not trying to be harsh on Richard. I own his other books and have ordered this one. As I understand it, he does cover 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6. vs 3.Bg5 h6!. But 3.g3 is a very important transpositional move that can easily leave black playing an opening he didn't intend to play- Catalan, QID. 3.g3 avoids the Bogo, ...Ba6 QID, and dodges the Tango. 3...b5 IS a good suggestion as it is sound and avoids transpositions to other openings. As a coach, I think it is very important to understand move order problems like this when constructing a repetoire. An example is the Nimzo- a very good opening to play, but you have to be ready for 1.Nf3; 1.c4; and 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 as well. This 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.g3 move order is very clever vs a player of the Tango, Nimzo/Benoni, or ...Ba6 QID if white is willing to play a Catalan or English.
3...b5! would also only take a paragraph...
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
roastednuts
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I love ChessPublishing
.com!

Posts: 17
Location: Gilbert
Joined: 05/26/05
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #34 - 06/08/05 at 10:45:31
Post Tools
Fluffy, I don't think you understand what Richard is working with here. He has a limit on how big the book can be! If you want to have 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.g3 in there, then someone else will want the Blackmar-Diemer, another person will want the Veresov, etc. If he put all of the non 2.c4 stuff in his book, it might be 300 pages! His publisher would never allow that. You also say that the book says "Complete Defense to 1.d4" and therefore he should have made it a complete defense. The problem is I highly doubt that Richard chose the title or at least the subtitle. Often times the publisher will add something to make the book look more appealing without realising that it contradicts what is in the book. So don't be so harsh on Richard.

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
fluffy
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #33 - 06/08/05 at 09:49:14
Post Tools
1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 e6 3 g3 will lead to a mainline opening that you may not be prepared for if you have nothing in mind against it.
I don't expect a suggestion vs 2.a3 Markovich you idiot. "Enough already"? Then what is this forum for?
I believe Palliser is wise enough to know that the 1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 e6 3 g3 has a point vs a Tango player. it is all too easy for a savvy player to find move orders like this vs such a specialized opening as the Tango.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Markovich
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 6099
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Joined: 09/17/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #32 - 06/08/05 at 07:43:57
Post Tools
Quote:
3...b5 is probably the best independent try. but it still should be given by Richard IMO, in the book or in his previous post... It would really only take a paragraph in the book.


Good grief, enough already!  "What should I, as a Tango player, play against 1. d4 Nf6  2. a3?  Oh dear, Richard Paliser doesn't tell me!"
  

The Great Oz has spoken!
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
fluffy
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #31 - 06/07/05 at 21:06:33
Post Tools
3...b5 is probably the best independent try. but it still should be given by Richard IMO, in the book or in his previous post... It would really only take a paragraph in the book.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
lnn2
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 1503
Location: nc
Joined: 09/22/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #30 - 06/07/05 at 20:43:37
Post Tools
1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 e6 3. g3 can be met by 3... b5! =, punishing White for delaying c4. It has been tried by  Anand, Karpov, Andersson amongst others, and is perhaps the reason why this move order for White is not common nowadays.

I don't see a problem of Richard focusing only on the Tango proper, though the title is misleading.  When I pay good money for a book, I am more interested to see theory developed in the critical lines, rather than harmless deviations! One can always plug gaps through the Flank Openings section on Chesspub or indeed, John Cox's upcoming work.  Smiley
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
fluffy
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #29 - 06/07/05 at 20:12:47
Post Tools
"It's a book on the Tango - not on everything after 1 d4 !" Richard, I am not trying to split hairs, but the title of the book is  "Tango! A Complete Defence to 1d4" Not "An Almost Complete Defence"! I just think a lot of supposed repetoire books leave holes for the reader. Tell me, what should an aspiring Tango player do vs 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.g3? Do you have a relatively simple solution, or must black play a Catalan or QID? I know this is not a common move order (much worse is Lane's ommision of 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4!), but these issues are very important in constructing a repetoire. I imagine many Tango players like to meet 1.c4 with 1...Nc6 or 1...Nf6 instead of 1...c5.  Yes, 3..c5 is probably ok and will lead to some Catalan or English, but you darn well better know the lines if you plan to go into them. They are easy for white to play, especially if they are part of his repetoire!
For the record, I have ordered the book and very much like Palliser's 1.d4! book. I am not trying to criticize, but I think constructing an opening repetoire like this can leave a player very vulnerable to certain move orers, and they are not so easy to fix.

DV
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Markovich
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 6099
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Joined: 09/17/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #28 - 06/07/05 at 10:33:38
Post Tools
Quote:
It's a book on the Tango - not on everything after 1 d4 ! Books on, say, the Benoni, Ruy Lopez or Najdorf don't cover all White's early deviations. If you want that then either buy a complete books like Yrjola and Tella's excellent ...d6 repertoire book or use books directed against anti-theory lines, such as 'Beating the Anti-Sicilians' or, in this case for 1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 e6 3 g3, Cox's forthcoming Everyman work.


So Richard, I play the Catalan, and I am reasonably happy after 1. d4 d5  2. c4 e6  3. Nf3 Nf6  4. g3 dxc4  5. Bg2 to face 5...Nc6.  Could I play 1. d4 Nf6  2. c4 Nc6  3. Nf3 e6  4. g3 with reasonable expectation of encoutering 4...d5  5. Bg2 dxc4?  I guess the question is, do you recommend something other than 5...d5 for Black?
  

The Great Oz has spoken!
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
X
God Member
*****
Offline


Education is a system
of imposed ignorance.Chomsky

Posts: 571
Joined: 10/04/03
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #27 - 06/07/05 at 00:23:15
Post Tools
I think the Tango is a good choice to cut down on the move order possibilities introduced by 1.Nf3.  For instance, if you play for the Nimzo-Indian, you need to learn other defensive systems against 3.Nc3 and 3.g3, after 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 e6.  However, if you play the Tango, then after 1.Nf3 Nf6 2.c4 Nc6, White has to play 3.d4, if he does not want to transpose to an English 1...e5 where he is committed to Nf3.  Of course, for Black to make use of this possibility, he must know how to play 1.c4 e5 as Black, but this is a good opening to know as Black anyway (especially since there are similar structures to the Tango in some lines).

After 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6, I think don't think Black has a lot to worry about:
- If 3.Bg5, we have the Torre Attack.  Look at Prie's section to learn how to play 3...h6!  He has a lot of good coverage on this.  
- If 3.Bf4, we have the London.  I don't think it should be too difficult to a find a good defensive system to this either.  One good approach is to play the natural 3...b6, and develop in Queen's Indian style.  Kamsky-Rozentalis, Manila 1992 shows a good development plan for Black.  If White plays for c4, then you are in the Miles System of the Queen's Indian.  This has some poison, but if you learn how to counter it, Black is fine.  This isn't a lot of theory to learn.
- If 3.e3, we have the Colle.  I would recommend 3...d5.  Learn how to counter the typical attacks, and you have good chances to play for a win.  Chances are you won't be playing someone with the positional subtlety of Yusupov.  This is not as drawish as you might think!  There are three principal continuations after 3...d5.  The first is the Colle-Koltanowski system, where White plays c3.  It is not too difficult to find a good system for Black.  I suggest looking at Valery Broznik's excellent book on the opening.  The second is the Colle-Zukertort system, where White plays b3.  I especially like Ziatdinov's approach as Black here.  You can look at some model games in a separate thread on this system.  The third approach is where White plays for c4.  I think Black's best is to transpose to the Symmetrical Tarrasch.  Once again Black is fine here, and I don't think the positions are so drawish.  The important thing is to have a good understanding of these positions.  There are a number of subtleties in these deceptively simple symmetrical structures.
- Lastly, we have 3.g3.  Black equalizes with 3...c5.  4.c4 transposes to a good line for Black in the Symmetrical English and 4.Bg2 Nc6 5.0-0 Qb6 6.dxc5 Bxc5 7.Nbd2 d5 "with good play" is given by Khalifman in Opening for Black according to Karpov.

Learn the English 1.c4 e5 and the Trompowsky (2.Bg5 e6 is consistent and good) and I think you essentially have a complete repertoire against 1.d4, 1.Nf3, and 1.c4.
  

Power to the People!&&http://www.gravel2008.us/           http://www.nationalinitiative.us/&&Mike Gravel for President 2008
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #26 - 06/06/05 at 13:27:46
Post Tools
It's a book on the Tango - not on everything after 1 d4 ! Books on, say, the Benoni, Ruy Lopez or Najdorf don't cover all White's early deviations. If you want that then either buy a complete books like Yrjola and Tella's excellent ...d6 repertoire book or use books directed against anti-theory lines, such as 'Beating the Anti-Sicilians' or, in this case for 1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 e6 3 g3, Cox's forthcoming Everyman work.
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
fluffy
Guest


Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #25 - 06/06/05 at 10:25:07
Post Tools
"although 3 g3!? is then outside the scope of the Tango " so much for "A Complete Repetoire". typical of todays books. Lane's book on the Chigorin and Center Counter covers garbage such as 1.g4 but leaves you high and dry if your opponent plays 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4. Move orders matter gentlemen. Too many holes like this in books will eventually leave the dear reader high and dry OTB.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #24 - 06/04/05 at 00:31:49
Post Tools
My copy of the book arrived from Amazon and it is even better than I expected. The book is 192 pages, not 144 as it says on Amazon. The explanations are very clear, and the book has a lot of material without making you feel lost in a maze of variations.

I would have liked to have seen some Bogo-Indian coverage (the book discusses the Catalan instead in the variation 3. Nf3 e6 4. g3) since it feels more thematically similar to the other variations, but I can always find Bogo-Indian material elsewhere. The coverage of the Zurich variation of the Nimzo-Indian is excellent and I can't wait to try it out.

I would have liked to have seen how some of the games concluded but understand the space limitations. Still, it would be nice if the accompanying pgn file on the Everyman site had the complete games. I can always find them in a database.

It's a great book, and I'm looking forward to Tango-ing!
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
roastednuts
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I love ChessPublishing
.com!

Posts: 17
Location: Gilbert
Joined: 05/26/05
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #23 - 05/31/05 at 10:35:29
Post Tools
Hey guys, I bought this book at the US Am West bookstore. All I can say is wow! I've briefly looked through it and it is packed with great stuff. Great job Richard!
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #22 - 05/28/05 at 09:56:26
Post Tools
Nice spot and mate Zarvox!
Yes, Tango players should go 2 Nf3 e6, although 3 g3!? is then outside the scope of the Tango (sorry - I wrote too much on the Tango to make it a complete book!).
John Cox is though covering how to meet such anti-c4 lines for Everyman.
Dealing with another point, even 4 a3 d5 5 cxd5 may be a small edge! All I can say is that 4...d5 is now very rare amongst the leading Tango exponents; it's just not dynamic enough!
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
culdesac
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


No sabemos lo que pasa,
eso es lo que pasa...

Posts: 25
Location: Leiden
Joined: 01/23/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #21 - 05/28/05 at 03:24:12
Post Tools
Hi,

I should get the book soon as well. As this seems to be a repertoire book I am curious to know what Richard Palliser recommends on the following move order:

1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 I suppose this will be Palliser's recommendation3.g3
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #20 - 05/27/05 at 20:39:36
Post Tools
I saw the book at my local Borders yesterday! Almost double the price at Amazon, though. Luckily, my Amazon order just shipped so I should be receiving the book soon. I will post some thoughts after I have had the book for a few days, and would enjoy discussing it with others here.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #19 - 05/24/05 at 09:45:12
Post Tools
Alias, thanks for pointing out that Everyman has the games available on their website. That will be very handy while reading the book (which Amazon says is "shipping soon" for my order).

culdesac, I agree that 6. h4 requires care, but is there anything especially dangerous after the simple 6...h5? The pin Bg5 doesn't scare me too much as it's not easy for White to add much pressure against the knight on f6.

I also noticed a cute Legal's mate here, e.g., 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5 4. d5 Ne7 5. e4 Ng6 6. h4 h5 7. Bg5 Bc5 8. Nf3 d6 9. a3 Bg4 10. Na4? Nxe4! 11. Bxd8?? (11. Nxc5 Nxg5 looks good for Black) Bxf2+ 12. Ke2 Nf4# 0-1
Obviously White is not likely to fall for that, but it's something to look out for and I thought it was cute. In any case, what's wrong with something like Bg4, Qd7, and 0-0-0 here for Black?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
culdesac
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


No sabemos lo que pasa,
eso es lo que pasa...

Posts: 25
Location: Leiden
Joined: 01/23/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #18 - 05/24/05 at 05:00:55
Post Tools
Hi all,

I am also looking forward to Richard Palliser's book. It seems that a lot of players consider the lines with 3.Nf3 as being the most annoying. From my own practice I can tell that the following line is also critical:

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 Nc6 3.Nc3 e5 4.d5 Ne7 5.e4 Ng6 6.h4 ! I think this is the best move in the position and black has to be very precise here...
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Foghorn
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline



Posts: 39
Location: Dallas
Joined: 03/21/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #17 - 05/20/05 at 10:17:03
Post Tools
Looks like Richard's Tango book has come out a little early here in the U.S.A.   It is advertised at both the chesscafe.com and amazon.com sites.  Chess Cafe handles book sales for the USCF.  In the past, the USCF has been known to advertise books for sale before they were actually in stock. Sad  However, Amazon does not do that.  Amazon's prices are substantially lower.  The Amazon ad notes that there are only three books left in stock!  A mistake or a huge number of advance orders?
  

Every solution has, embedded within it, the next major problem.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Alias
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 1503
Location: East of the river Svartån
Joined: 11/19/04
LetRe: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #16 - 05/19/05 at 23:42:07
Post Tools
I like that you can download the games and game segments from the recently pubished books on Everyman. http://www.everymanbooks.com/ It's a good way to see the content of a book. Let's hope other pubisher follow this idea.
  

Don't check me with no lightweight stuff.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
TopNotch
God Member
*****
Offline


I only look 1 move ahead,
but its always the best

Posts: 1968
Joined: 01/04/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #15 - 05/18/05 at 20:54:39
Post Tools
The Tango does indeed look intriguing Grin

I will take a second look at Orlov's original booklet, as this could prove be quite a useful second string to my usual Kings Indian.

If only I could Tango to the beat of the Trompovsky, I would be a very happy man. The Tromp is quite a nuisance for diehard KID fans like myself.

In the meantime I look forward to the reviews of Richard's book, both here and perhaps on TWIC.   

Regards

Top Grin
  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #14 - 05/18/05 at 12:01:04
Post Tools
The link to this thread still shows up in the Nimzo forum, so it's no problem.

Richard, thanks for replying. It is wonderful that authors such as you post here.

I can't wait til the book comes! Amazon is estimating that it will ship June 5 for me, so hopefully it will come in early June.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1813
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #13 - 05/18/05 at 08:34:36
Post Tools
I don't think you should feel bad about this. Assuming it's technologically impractical for the thread to be reproduced simultaneously in more than one forum site, I think this is one of those cases where you just can't win. The logics are equal: the Tango is a Daring Defence in terms of its root idea (3 Nc3 e5), but a Nimzo-and-related defence in terms of how it normally eventuates in high-level praxis (3 Nf3 e6). Of course -- and here I'd insert one of those smily things if I used them -- if as a result of Richard's new book the 3 Nf3 e6 4 a3 d6 line becomes popular, the Daring Defences site is where the wonderful Tango'll rightly belong ...
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
alumbrado
God Member
*****
Offline


Esse quam videri bonus
malebo

Posts: 1418
Location: London
Joined: 02/17/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #12 - 05/18/05 at 08:07:02
Post Tools
Quote:
Meanwhile - despite the new home of this thread - there should be some Tango coverage in the next Nimzo and Benoni update.
Oh dear, I wish I hadn't moved the thread now  Undecided  Too late to move it back, too, as I don;t have control over this forum  Embarrassed
  

If sometimes we fly too close to the sun, at least this shows we are spreading our wings.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1813
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #11 - 05/18/05 at 07:01:08
Post Tools
Thanks for this Richard -- looking forward to June!
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
IMRichardPalliser
Senior Member
****
Offline



Posts: 305
Location: York
Joined: 03/23/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #10 - 05/18/05 at 06:15:32
Post Tools
Thanks for all the comments. The book is being published in the US and is out some time in June (John Emms may know exactly when).
Yes, 2 Nf3 e6 3 c4 Nc6 may look a little silly, but isn't and does pack good shock value.  Smiley
I don't especially like 4 a3 d5, but 4...d6 is holding up well. After that Black can reach the sort of fighting and unbalanced position Tango players are after, unless White allows very comfortable equality with 5 Nc3 g6 6 e4 Bg7 7 Be2 0-0 8 0-0 Re8 9 Be3 e5 10 dxe5 or 10 d5 Nd4 11 Nxd4 etc).
I do also show that 11 Re1 isn't all it's cracked up to be, but not by following my slightly desperate q sac against Summerscale!
Meanwhile - despite the new home of this thread - there should be some Tango coverage in the next Nimzo and Benoni update.
  
Back to top
WWW  
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #9 - 05/17/05 at 18:41:41
Post Tools
Sorry for posting in the wrong forum - I didn't see the Tango mentioned in either forum, so put it with Nimzo since it so often transposes to a Nimzo or Bogo.

TopNotch, 2. Nf3 e6 3. c4 Nc6 is the same as 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nf3 e6, so what's the problem?

I would be annoyed if I needed a completely different repertoire for 2. Nf3 as for 2. c4, but I don't think that's the case.

Also, I'm not sure I agree with the comparison to the Alekhine. True, if White decides to start chasing the knight around with 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6 3. d5 Ne5 4. f4 it's like a mirror Four Pawns Attack, but the play seems pretty different from the Four Pawns Attack. Anyway, most players go 3. Nf3 or 3. Nc3, not 3. d5 here.

After 3. Nc3 e5, it resembles a Nimzovich Defense to me, whereas after 3. Nf3 e6 we usually get either a Nimzo-Indian, Bogo-Indian, or the 4. a3 line, which we all want to learn more about.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
TopNotch
God Member
*****
Offline


I only look 1 move ahead,
but its always the best

Posts: 1968
Joined: 01/04/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #8 - 05/17/05 at 12:14:24
Post Tools
How do you Tango against 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 as 2...e6 3.c4 Nc6 really does look a distinctly odd.

Just a thought

Top  Grin
  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1813
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #7 - 05/17/05 at 05:31:43
Post Tools
Thanks for doing this alumbrado.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
alumbrado
God Member
*****
Offline


Esse quam videri bonus
malebo

Posts: 1418
Location: London
Joined: 02/17/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #6 - 05/17/05 at 05:23:59
Post Tools
Yes  Wink
  

If sometimes we fly too close to the sun, at least this shows we are spreading our wings.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1813
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #5 - 05/17/05 at 05:00:48
Post Tools
Sorry Zarvox, we 'crossed in the post', which is why I didn't comment on 4 ...d6.

I sincerely hope you're right! -- this would be a much more exciting way for Black to play it if it can be made to work. I had understood that, after 4 ...d6 5 Nc3 g6 6 e4 Bg7 7 Be2 0-0 8 0-0 9 Be3 e5 10 d5 Nd4, 11 Re1!? (unmentioned by Orlov, or Benjamin) was good for White. I had also noticed, though, that against Aaron Summerscale in 2001, Richard Palliser came out with a new move, 11 ...Bd7!? (previously 11 ...Ne2 had been played). The game, which you can find on ChessLive, continued 12 h3 a5 13 Bf1 Nf3 14 Qf3 c5 15 dc bc 16 Rad1 Be6 and was drawn on move 35. I can't wait to see what the new book says about this line!

PS. Should this thread be copied to the Daring Defences forum?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1813
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #4 - 05/16/05 at 17:59:02
Post Tools
Hi there! Hope chess 'n' life are treating you well!

It's ages since I looked at this stuff and, obviously, Richard'll have infinitely better answers than I do, but I know I concluded that 4 ...d5 was best, if not necessary -- strategically speaking the hope must be that Black's self-blocking of the c-pawn is compensated for by the slight weakness of b3. After 5 Nc3 Be7 6 Bg5 (6 Bf4 0-0!), Orlov's main line is 6 ...dc 7 e3 Na5 8 Nd2 (8 Bc4?! Nc4 9 Qa4 Nd7!) c5, which he thinks OK for Black after 9 dc Bc5 10 Ne4 Qd1. I remember (a) thinking I saw a rat here -- maybe White's just a bit better, (b) thinking Black had other interesting eighth moves, but also, (c), preferring Orlov's alternative suggestion on move six of 6 ...h6!? 7 Bh4 (7 Bf6 is weaker acc. O.) Ne4!? (7 ...dc is obviously possible by analogy with O's main line, but I prefer this). Now O. gives 8 Be7 Ne7!? 9 e3 0-0 as roughly equal, but I guess 8 ...Qe7 is possible too.

What do you reckon? Obviously these Queen's Gambit-style positions, whether or not they're OK, might not suit everybody. I've done OK with them at my humble level, but then most folk go 3 Nc3 and allow me a Nimzowitsch Defence-style kingside attack, so I guess I take the slightly rough with the extremely smooth!
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
:
Reply #3 - 05/16/05 at 17:48:53
Post Tools
Markovich, did you see the Joel Benjamin article I mentioned? See Part 2 at http://www.jeremysilman.com/chess_opng_shrtcts/040424_black_knights_tango.html which has some interesting games with 4. a3 d6 followed by a King's Indian set-up. Benjamin says:

"The idea is to switch to a King's Indian Defense with each side possessing an extra move, a2-a3 for White and e7-e6 for Black. The White move might possibly prepare b2-b4 but it is not generally useful. In some cases the b3-square may be accessible to the Black pieces.  Black's e7-e6 at first sight seems completely useless because Black's plan is to attack the center with …e5. However, this appearance is deceiving.  The pawn on e6 contributes should White consider advancing d4-d5. Meanwhile, Black will wait to push …e5 at an advantageous moment."

In any case, I'll be very interested in seeing what Palliser's book recommends against 4. a3.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Markovich
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 6099
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Joined: 09/17/04
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #2 - 05/16/05 at 14:44:07
Post Tools
[quote author=Michael Ayton  link=1116207895/0#1 date=1116244402]Yes, I too am counting the days till 1 June! I've played the Tango for several years now (since before Orlov's book appeared), with pretty good success and always with interesting positions, both strategically and tactically.[/quote]

Naturally enough for an Alekhine's player  :) .  But what happens after 3. Nf3 e6  4. a3?  I looked at this after reading Orlov's book, and it didn't look that appetizing.
  

The Great Oz has spoken!
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Michael Ayton
God Member
*****
Offline


‘You’re never alone with
a doppelgänger.’

Posts: 1813
Location: durham
Joined: 04/19/03
Gender: Male
Re: Palliser's Tango Book
Reply #1 - 05/16/05 at 11:53:22
Post Tools
Yes, I too am counting the days till 1 June! I've played the Tango for several years now (since before Orlov's book appeared), with pretty good success and always with interesting positions, both strategically and tactically.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Zarvox
Junior Member
**
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 71
Location: California
Joined: 05/15/05
Palliser's Tango Book
05/15/05 at 20:44:53
Post Tools
So, is anyone else eagerly looking forward to Richard Palliser's book on the Black Knights Tango (1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 Nc6)? I pre-ordered it from Amazon.com and it's supposed to be available on June 1.

I became interested in the Tango recently after reading Joel Benjamin's article on it (see http://www.jeremysilman.com/chess_opng_shrtcts/archive.html), and was excited when I saw that a new book is coming out on it by Richard Palliser, especially considering how good Palliser's other books have been.

I've been trying it in blitz and have been getting good positions, even from only reading Benjamin's article. So far, I usually get 3. Nc3 e5, which is fun to play, 3. Nf3 e6 4. Nc3 Bb4 with a Nimzo, or 3. Nf3 e6 4. g3 Bb3+ with a Bogo-Indian. No one has tried 4. a3 against me yet. Some may not like all the transpositions, but I don't mind since it gives me more confidence in the soundness of the opening, the independent variations are very interesting, and it does bypass a lot of Nimzo-Indian variations.

Richard, if you see this, can you offer any tidbits about the book beyond the publisher's description? Also, how does it compare to Orlov's book, aside from obviously being more recent?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bookmarks: del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Google+ Linked in reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Yahoo