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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Ruy Lopez Riga Variation (Read 7221 times)
MNb
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #10 - 11/14/05 at 21:22:09
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Rather off topic, but what about this position then, Markovich?

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 (kind of improved KG  Grin) 4.Nc3 fxe4 5.Nxe4 d5 6.Nxe5 dxe4 7.Qh5+ g6 8.Nxg6 hxg6 9.Qxh8 Qf6 Unzicker-Contedini, SUI 1964, 10.Qxf6 Nxf6.

In years since long gone by, I lost two games with this as Black, without having a chance. But in these days I understood even less about chess than now, of course.
Still since then I wonder: are the two Black knights really stronger than the White rooks?
Maybe you could also point out the differences between the two endgames?
I am obviously angling to a free chess lesson from an experienced teacher.  Wink
  

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Markovich
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #9 - 11/14/05 at 20:55:53
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Quite right Klick!

I was amazed not only thr number of black wins but of the number of quick black wins!

It might be worth a look but only after i start playing e5 on a more regular basis.


You really should not dream of winning quickly with this variation unless your opponents are unbooked.  It's mainly an invitation to a particular ending.

12. Qd8+ Qxd8  13. Nxd8 Kxd8  14. Kxh2 Be6 and now, in my view, a very challenging idea is 15. c3, preserving the two bishops.  I believe that this idea is due to Tarrasch. Subsequent play is unforced, but considering that White keeps his bishops and that there is still a great deal of wood on the board, I would much rather have the minor pieces.  I admit it's a game of chess, but White's chances are better than in the initial position.

For example, if 15...f5  16. Bg5+ Kc8  17. Nd2 h6  18. Be3 Rd8 it appears to me that White doesn't even need to prevent ...Rd3 but can just go ahead and play 19. f3.
  

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basqueknight
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #8 - 11/12/05 at 09:57:37
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Quite right Klick!

I was amazed not only thr number of black wins but of the number of quick black wins!

It might be worth a look but only after i start playing e5 on a more regular basis.
  
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Klick
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #7 - 11/11/05 at 15:59:37
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John Emms comments in his books on the RL that after 12.Qd8+ that the endgame arising "has been known for many years to favour White.".  However, statistical results do  not really seem to confirm this.
  

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Markovich
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #6 - 11/11/05 at 15:31:36
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Personally, I think that after 12. Qd8+, White stands quite well.  I very much prefer the two pieces to the rook.
  

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basqueknight
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #5 - 11/08/05 at 10:03:47
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Man i just took my first serious look at this thread and i was amazed at some of  the positions that black gets and even if hes a piece down he is up somthing like 5 pawns!. Also the value of the pieces seem to change in this line. Here are a few black wins which i found rather entertaining.

[Event "EU-ch U14"]
[Site "Herceg Novi"]
[Date "2005.09.14"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Kruglyakov,Pavlo"]
[Black "Aagaard,Kasper"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "C80"]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4 7.Re1 d5 8.Nxd4 Bd6
9.Nxc6 Bxh2+ 10.Kf1 Qh4 11.Rxe4+ dxe4 12.Nd4+ b5 13.Bb3 Bg4 14.Ne2 Rd8 15.Qe1 Be5 16.c3 0-0
17.Ng1 Rfe8 18.Be3 Qh1 19.f4 exf3 20.Qf2 Qxg2+ 21.Qxg2 fxg2+ 22.Kxg2 Bxc3 23.Nxc3 Rxe3 24.Kf2 Re5
25.Kg3 h5 26.Rf1 Rd3+ 27.Kh2 Be6 0-1

[Event "Budapest FS09 GM"]
[Site "Budapest"]
[Date "2005.09.03"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Pilgaard,Kim"]
[Black "Bergez,Luc"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "C80"]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4 7.Re1 d5 8.Nxd4 Bd6
9.Nxc6 Bxh2+ 10.Kh1 Qh4 11.Rxe4+ dxe4 12.Qd8+ Qxd8 13.Nxd8+ Kxd8 14.Kxh2 Be6 15.Nc3 c5 16.a3 c4
17.Be3 b5 18.Rd1+ Kc8 19.Nxb5 axb5 20.Bxb5 Rd8 21.Rb1 c3 22.bxc3 Rxa3 23.c4 Rxe3 24.fxe3 Rd2
25.Bc6 f5 26.Rb5 g6 27.Re5 Bf7 28.Rc5 Kd8 29.Bd5 Be8 30.Ra5 Re2 31.Ra8+ Ke7 32.Ra7+ Kd6
33.Ra6+ Kc5 34.Ra5+ Kb6 35.Ra8 Bc6 36.Rc8 Bxd5 37.cxd5 Kb7 38.Rh8 Rxe3 39.Rxh7+ Kb6 40.c4 Rc3
41.Rg7 Rxc4 42.Rxg6+ Kc5 43.d6 Rd4 44.Rg5 Rd5 45.Kg3 Kd4 46.Kf2 e3+ 47.Ke2 Ke4 48.Rg6 f4
49.Re6+ Kf5 50.Re8 Rd2+ 51.Kf1 Rxd6 52.g3 Kg4 53.gxf4 Kf3 54.Ke1 Ra6 55.Kd1 Ra1+ 56.Kc2 e2
0-1

[Event "Barbera del Valles op"]
[Site "Barbera del Valles"]
[Date "2005.07.04"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Parligras,Mircea"]
[Black "Garcia Roman,Daniel"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "C80"]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4 7.Re1 d5 8.c4 dxc3
9.Nxc3 Be6 10.Ne5 Nxc3 11.bxc3 Qd6 12.Bxc6+ bxc6 13.Qa4 Qc5 14.Rb1 Bd6 15.Be3 Qxc3 16.Bd4 Qd2
17.Qxc6+ Ke7 18.Nf3 Qxa2 19.Bxg7 Qc4 20.Qxc4 dxc4 21.Bxh8 Rxh8 22.Nd4 Ra8 23.Re4 a5 24.Nxe6 fxe6
25.Rxc4 a4 26.Rc2 a3 27.Ra2 Be5 28.Rb3 Bb2 29.Kf1 c5 30.Ke2 Kd6 31.Kd3 Rg8 32.g3 Kd5
33.Rb7 c4+ 34.Kc2 Rf8 35.f4 h5 36.Rb5+ Kd4 37.Rxh5 Rb8 38.Re5 Rb3 39.Rxe6 Rc3+ 40.Kd2 Rd3+
41.Ke2 Kc3 42.Rb6 Kc2 43.Rb4 Kc3 44.Rb5 Kc2 45.Rb4 c3 46.f5 Rd2+ 47.Ke3 Rxh2 48.f6 Rh7
49.g4 Kb1 50.Rxa3 c2 51.Rc4 Bxa3 52.Ke4 c1=Q 53.Rxc1+ Bxc1 54.Kf5 Rh1 55.g5 Rf1+ 56.Kg6 Rg1
57.f7 Bxg5 0-1

[Event "City corr"]
[Site "corr"]
[Date "1906.??.??"]
[Round "0"]
[White "City Berlin"]
[Black "City Riga"]
[Result "0-1"]
[Eco "C80"]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4 7.Re1 d5 8.Nxd4 Bd6
9.Nxc6 Bxh2+ 10.Kh1 Qh4 11.Rxe4+ dxe4 12.Qd8+ Qxd8 13.Nxd8+ Kxd8 14.Kxh2 Be6 15.Be3 f5 16.Nc3 Ke7
17.g4 g6 18.g5 Rag8 19.Bd4 h6 20.Bf6+ Kf7 21.Bxh8 Rxh8 22.Rd1 hxg5+ 23.Kg2 Kf6 24.Bb3 Bxb3
25.axb3 Ke6 26.b4 Rh7 27.Ne2 Rd7 28.Nd4+ Kf6 29.c3 c6 30.Rh1 g4 31.Rh8 Re7 32.Ne2 Rd7
33.Nd4 Re7 34.Rf8+ Kg7 35.Rd8 f4 36.Rd6 Kf7 37.Nc2 Re6 38.Rd7+ Re7 39.Rd6 Re6 40.Rd1 Kf6
41.c4 Re7 42.Rd4 Kg5 43.Rd6 e3 44.f3 e2 45.Ne1 g3 46.b5 Rh7 47.bxc6 bxc6 48.Re6 Rh2+
49.Kg1 Rf2 50.Nc2 Rxf3 51.Rxe2 Rd3 52.Ne1 Rb3 53.Rd2 f3 54.Nd3 a5 0-1

All very fun to go over if  not a bit biased on my part as white has a a fair share of wins as well.
  
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kevinludwig
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #4 - 07/20/05 at 16:46:46
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What do you think of the line:

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. 0-0 Nxe4 6. d4 exd4 7. Re1 d5 8. Nxd4 Bd6 9. Nxc6 Bxh2+ 10. Kh1 Qh4 11. Rxe4+ dxe4 12. Qd8+ Qxd8 13. Nxd8+ Kxd8 14. Kxh2

Is this the ending that black should easily hold? It seems that white's game might be preferable, but I couldn't find the Capablanca-Lasker game you reference.
  
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zarathustra
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #3 - 07/07/05 at 21:04:37
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Quote:
"8. c4!? (Kortjnoj) may also be a critical line.

In the main line 8. Nxd4 Bd6 white can try to win the piece by 9. f3
instead of 9. Nxc6. Seen any analyses of this move, Taljechin? Should black go 9 ... Bxf2+ immediately?"

CheckMate



Here's some analysis I have on 8.c4.  I can't find an advantage for White.   I cut out some variations because it was a huge mess of braces and parentheses, but this should give you the gist of it.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4 7.Re1 d5
8.c4!? Bb4

[8...dxc3!? 9.Nxc3 Bb4]
9.cxd5
[9.Bg5 f6 10.Bd2 Bxd2 11.Nbxd2 0–0 12.cxd5 Nxd2 13.dxc6 Nxf3+ 14.Qxf3 bxc6=;
9.Nbd2 0–0 10.cxd5 Nxd2 (10...Bxd2 is =) 11.Bxd2 Bxd2 12.Qxd2 Qxd5-/+]
9...Bxe1
10.Qxe1 Qxd5
11.Bb3 Qf5!
12.Bc2

[12.Nbd2 0–0 (12...Ne5!? 13.Nxd4 Qxf2+ 14.Qxf2 Nxf2 15.Kxf2 0–0 unclear) ]
12...Qc5!
13.Qxe4+

[13.Bxe4 0–0 14.Bf4 (14.Bxc6 Qxc6 15.Nxd4 Re8 16.Be3 Qg6 17.Nc3 b6 18.Nde2 Bb7 19.Nf4) 14...Bf5 15.Bxc6 bxc6 (15...Qxc6 16.Nxd4 Qf6 17.Nxf5 Qxf5 18.Bxc7 Rfe8 19.Qf1 Rac8 20.Bg3 Qc2 21.Nc3 Qxb2 22.Nd5+/=) 16.Qe5 Qxe5 17.Bxe5 (17.Nxe5 g5 18.Bg3 c5 19.Nd2 f6 20.Nec4 Rfe8 21.Bxc7 Re2 22.Bb6 Rc8 23.Nd6 Rc6 24.Nxf5 Rxb6 25.Nc4 Rbe6 26.g4 Rc2=/+) ]
13...Be6
14.Nbd2

[14.Bg5 h6 15.Bh4 g5 16.Bg3 0–0–0=; 14.Bf4 0–0–0 15.Nbd2 Qd5 16.Qe1 d3=]
14...0–0–0
15.Nb3 Qc4
16.Bd3 Qa4=
eg. 17.Nbd2 Nb4
18.b3 Qc6
19.Qxc6 Nxc6
20.Bb2 h6=




Another clipping:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0–0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4 7.Re1 d5 8.Nxd4 Bd6
9.f3?! Qh4
10.fxe4 Qxh2+

[10...Bg4! 11.exd5+ Kf8 12.Nf3 Bxf3 13.gxf3 Qxh2+ 14.Kf1 Bg3 15.Be3 Qh1+ (15...Ne5 16.Re2 Qh1+ 17.Bg1 Nxf3 18.Rg2 Nh2+ 19.Rxh2 Bxh2 20.Qg4 Bxg1 21.Qxg1 Qxd5 22.Nc3 Qf3+ 23.Qf2 Qxf2+ 24.Kxf2 h5-/+) 16.Ke2 Qg2+ 17.Kd3 Ne5+ (17...Nb4+ 18.Kc4 Bxe1 19.Qxe1 Nxc2 20.Bxc2 Qxc2+ 21.Qc3 Qa4+ 22.Qb4+ Qxb4+ 23.Kxb4 h5=/+) 18.Kc3 Bxe1+ 19.Qxe1 Qxf3-/+]
11.Kf1 Qh1+
12.Kf2 Qh4+  =


So instant draw for Black, or the interesting 10...Bg4 if he wants to play for the win.

Other tries?
  
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CheckMate
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #2 - 07/07/05 at 12:19:02
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8. c4!? (Kortjnoj) may also be a critical line.
In the main line 8. Nxd4 Bd6 white can try to win the piece by 9. f3
instead of 9. Nxc6. Seen any analyses of this move, Taljechin? Should black go 9 ... Bxf2+ immediately?

CheckMate

  
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TalJechin
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Re: Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
Reply #1 - 07/03/05 at 05:03:54
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Welcome to the forum, you old Persian god! Wink

I don't know much about the Spanish, but to me Riga seems like a good idea! Cheesy

Latvians often display a very tactical style of play (Tal, Miezis, Shabalov etc) so this variation seems correctly named after their capital.

I just browsed a few games, but was struck by the number of very quick wins for black (how often does that happen in the Ruy!?). Especially those Bxh2 ideas make the Spanish look like just another open game like the Prussian, Traxler etc...

Here's two games I enjoyed

Carlsson,D (2300) - Hamalainen,S (2185) [C80]
ECC, Rethymnon GRE (6), 2003

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4 7.Re1 d5 8.Nxd4 Bd6 9.Nxc6 Bxh2+ 10.Kf1 Qh4 11.Rxe4+ dxe4 12.Ne5+ b5 13.Qd5 0-0 14.Nxf7 Rxf7 15.Be3 c6 0-1

Almasi,Z (2650) - Varga,Z (2540) [C80]
CRO-chT Tucepi, 1996

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4 7.Re1 d5 8.Nxd4 Bd6 9.Qf3 0-0 10.Nxc6 bxc6 11.Bxc6 Bxh2+ 12.Kxh2 Qd6+ 13.Bf4 Qxc6 14.Nc3 Bf5 15.Nxe4 dxe4 16.Qc3 Qxc3 17.bxc3 f6 18.Rab1 Rf7 19.Rb4 g5 20.Be3 Rd7 21.a3 Kf7 22.Reb1 Re8 23.Rc4 Bg4 24.Rb7 Bd1 25.Rcxc7 Rxc7 26.Rxc7+ Re7 27.Rc8 Bxc2 28.Bc5 Re6 29.Rc7+ Kg6 30.Bd4 h5 31.Kg1 h4 32.Kh2 f5 33.Rg7+ Kh6 34.Rf7 f4 35.Rf6+ Rxf6 36.Bxf6 Bd3 37.a4 Kh5 38.Be5 Kg4 39.Bf6 Bf1 40.Kg1 Bc4 41.Bd8 Kh5 42.Bb6 Kg4 43.Kh2 Kf5 44.Kg1 g4 45.Bd8 h3 46.Bb6 Bd5 47.gxh3 gxh3 48.Kh2 Kg4 49.a5 Be6 0-1


My database has a few references to a certain Prof Berger who seems to be the one who came up with the line you mention:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 a6 6.Ba4 exd4!? 7.Re1 d5 8.Bg5! [ 8.Nxd4? Bd6! 9.Nxc6 Bxh2+!=] 8...Qd6 9.c4± Prof. Berger.

Anyway, if the theoretical main lines are all full of 'ancient truths' then it may be even more tempting to do a check with fritz and start playing it! Cheesy

Unfortunately, I don't play 1...e5  Cry
  
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zarathustra
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Ruy Lopez Riga Variation
07/03/05 at 01:09:48
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Hi, 1st time poster  here.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 exd4!?

I've been interested in this variation for some time now, and have come to the conclusion that the Riga represents a excellent drawing weapon for Black.  Using analytical assistance from all of the top commercial chess engines, I can't find any way for White to claim an advantage from this opening.   Black's play in the famous Capablanca-Ed.Lasker game was flawed and Black should be able to easily hold the R+2P vs. B+Kt endings.  Careful analysis of slow-time control thematic engine tournaments supports this contention.
Using Chesspub.exe I found some interesting analysis from J. Palkovi advocating the line 8.Bg5!? (after 7.Re1 d5).  Much of the analysis I had independently produced, but I came to a different conclusion about the assessment of one critical variation: after 8.Bg5 f6(!) 9.Nxd4 Bc5 10.Nxc6 Bxf2+ 11.Kf1 Qd7 12.Nc3 bxc6 13.Nxe4 Bxe1 14.Nxf6+ gxf6 15.Qh5+ Kf8 16.Bh6+ Ke7 17.Rxe1+ Kd8 18.Bxc6 Qxc6 19.Bg7 Rg8 20.Qf7 Bf5 21.Qxg8+ Kd7 22.Qf7+ Kc8 23.Bxf6 "and White is a pawn up" - Palkovi.  However, Black simplys plays 23...Bxc2, regaining the pawn with a dead equal endgame.

I'm hoping to start some discussion, or perhaps hear some dissenting opinions about this interesting variation.

Z
  
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