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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match (Read 61291 times)
GMEricPrie
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #173 - 10/03/05 at 02:42:25
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I knew I had seen some improvement posted by some BDGeer somewhere  Smiley

That is right Arkhein, 20.Rf5 Bf6  21.Rxh5 Rxh5 22.Qxh5 0-0-0 and Black is not better as the weakness of White's h pawn is not very relevant 23.Qe2! ( threatening Bxa6) 23...Rh8 24.h5 Nf4 and the best for Black is even to leave the Nf4 to its fate in order to open the long diagonal with an easy blockade on dark squares in case of capture.

Surely a safer way for White to achieve the draw!
  
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ArKheiN
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #172 - 10/01/05 at 05:23:04
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OK Arkhein, I touched the bishop ;o) so I have to move it, preferably to e7, threatening to win a second pawn and intending 20.d6 Bf6, his best place.

That is probably why Patrik played the prophylactic 19.Qf2 


Here is my copy and past when I gived Rdf1! as an improvement in your game's thread: "And the only move to stay with a pawn up for Black (maybe they should give up that pawn) is 19..Be7 20.Rf5 Bxh4 21.Rxh5(Rxh4!?)Rxh5 22.Qxh5 Be7 23.Be2! (with the idea of Bg4) and White have a very nice play for the pawn, one of Black's problem here is the king in the centre. I think that 19.Rdf1 is something like +/= and 19.Qf2 is = "

Quote:
4.f3! exf3?! (4...e3) 5.Nxf3


4..e3 isn't dangerous at all, no one BDGer fears that defense, it still give an attack with pawn storm g4-h4, the pieces are well develloped (for example Nc3, Bd3 or c4, Ne2, Be3, Qd2, 0-0 or 0-0-0) without the cost of the pawn.
  
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GMEricPrie
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #171 - 10/01/05 at 02:46:45
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OK Arkhein, I touched the bishop ;o) so I have to move it, preferably to e7, threatening to win a second pawn and intending 20.d6 Bf6, his best place.

That is probably why Patrik played the prophylactic 19.Qf2 Wink
  
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GMEricPrie
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #170 - 10/01/05 at 02:39:08
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1.d4 d5 2.e4?

There should be another name than BDG for that sequence...Albin Reversed, Queen's pawn French Rubinstein, Caro Kann, Modern; any other ideas ?  Smiley

2...dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6?!

3...e5!= Black has easy play and that is the point with the Lemberger provided that it is played in an EP spirit  Smiley
From that stage I would rather be on the White side.

4.f3! exf3?! (4...e3) 5.Nxf3
White has good chances provided that they play in an ED spirit and WE WON the match 2,5-0,5  Wink

  
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #169 - 09/30/05 at 20:55:40
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There is equality and equality of course. Can White strive for a dynamically equal position after 3...e5 4.Nge2 (counterintuitive move imo) Bb4 or has Black easy play?
If the latter is the case, than the BDG is about as dead as the Gréco-Möller Attack.
  

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ArKheiN
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #168 - 09/30/05 at 15:36:29
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19.Rdf1 is what I was expecting...
19...Bd6 20.Rhg1 (20.Rf5 Nf4) Rh7 (21.Rg5 Qe7) and the game is =+  exactly like against 19.Qf2.


20.Rf5! is the move (and was the idea of my improvement). And you give 20..Nf4, then 21.Bxf4 exf4 22.e5! 0-0-0 23.Rxf4 and I wait for your =/+, I would say +/= at least, and for me White is +/= after 19.Rdf1!

Quote:
The Lemberger refutes the BDG, because of 3...e5! no Master will ever play it regularly and 4...Bb4 buries the Rasmussen 4.Nge2.  


If we agree that (=) agast the BDG is a refutation, then the Lemberger refutes the BDG (White "only" have draw, they are refuted!) but if (=) is a refutation, then, there is more than 1 way to reach that. But I don't consider an equality as being a refutation, sorry Smiley

Of course I admit with you that 4.Nge2 Bb4 is a quite easy way to reach (=) for Black, but that's not a way to show the pawn sacrifice is bad, so logically, this is a REAL(=) for White too (I say real because Black are not always convinced of the (=) for White after the gambit accepted), that's not so bad no?, but not too ambitious at your level where White try to have +/= from the first move and to keep it, and gradually trying to improve the slight advantage, so I understand your point Eric Smiley
  
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #167 - 09/30/05 at 15:09:49
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Well, possibly not the blindfold improvisation 20.Rf5 Nf4  Smiley
  
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #166 - 09/30/05 at 14:56:46
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Very much ressembles the politic situation in Germany  Cheesy

19.Rdf1 is what I was expecting...
19...Bd6 20.Rhg1 (20.Rf5 Nf4) Rh7 (21.Rg5 Qe7) and the game is =+  exactly like against 19.Qf2.

Should I have continued, win it and make a couple of chatterboxes cool out ?  8)

Can't be bothered.  That overall result serves my talk as I also have to 'fight' against the good people  Smiley inside my own camp.

The Lemberger refutes the BDG, because of 3...e5! no Master will ever play it regularly and 4...Bb4 buries the Rasmussen 4.Nge2.
  
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #165 - 09/29/05 at 11:47:47
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BDG leads 3-1 (2 wins, 2 draws, 0 lost). It is not a bad result, is it? Hey, you antiBDGers, what the gambit is with you?


Sure, we scored 75% in 4 games, that's not bad, mostly when we see BDG's reputation.

But Markovich could have draw with a little more proper play (for example f5 instead of Re4?), it's important to notice that. And don't forgot the improvement I found in your game against Prié (Rdf1! instead of your Qf2) with +/= at least, instead of (=).

Quote:
Looking back at the game, perhaps 22...Kxc7 was better than my 22...Qxc7.  I thought, mistakenly, that to win, it would be enough merely to bring about some more exchanges (envisioning ...Qf4).  But after 22...Kxc7, Black is better set to play ...f5, which is his main source of counterplay.


Yes, I think 22..Kxc7 was slighty more precise than 22..Qxc7, but I think White can draw everywhere with a good play.
  
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #164 - 09/29/05 at 11:34:29
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I maintain my original view that after 9...Nh5 Black is slightly better.  White may indeed be able to draw with best play, however. 

Looking back at the game, perhaps 22...Kxc7 was better than my 22...Qxc7.  I thought, mistakenly, that to win, it would be enough merely to bring about some more exchanges (envisioning ...Qf4).  But after 22...Kxc7, Black is better set to play ...f5, which is his main source of counterplay.

My present view is that the line most critical for 5...Bf5 6. Ne5 e6 is Patrik's 7. g4 Bg6  8. Bg2 c6  9. h4 Bb4  10. Bg5.  I will look further at that.
  

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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #163 - 09/29/05 at 06:47:16
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Congratulations ArKheiN! My final line analysis went 37.Rf1 and game is over... 37...f5 [37...f6 38.Nc5+ Kc8 39.Qa8+ Kc7 40.Na6+ Kb6 41.Rc1 Re4 42.Qc8+-] 38.Nc5+ Kc8 39.Qa6+ Kc7 40.Qa7+ Kc8 41.Qa8+ Kc7 42.Na6+ Kb6 43.Rc1 Re4 44.Qc8 Re7 45.Nb4 Re6 46.Qa6+ Kc7 47.Qa7+ Kc8 48.Rxc6+ Qxc6 49.Nxc6 Rxc6 50.b4+-
BDG leads 3-1 (2 wins, 2 draws, 0 lost). It is not a bad result, is it? Hey, you antiBDGers, what the gambit is with you?

And yes, good news everyone, Rajmund Emanuel has found an improvement in the game Schoupal vs Bonsai. I´m going to check it today and soon to send. BDG is alive!
  
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #162 - 09/26/05 at 22:13:53
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Oh Markovich, gg, I think your only real error was 32..Re4 that apparently stopped a4 at first sight (but not really, like the game showed) and something like 32..f6 or 32..f5 were better, but I would have played a4 anyway, but not that powerful here. But I am really really surprised of your premature resigning!! Yes 37..f5 should lose according to my analysis , but even here it's premature to resign. Here is a little possible continuation after 37..f5 that could have explained the resigning : 38.Nc5+ Kc8 39.Qa6+ Kc7 40.Rc1 Rg4 41.Qb7+ Kd8 42.h3! Rf4 43.Qb6+ Ke7 44.Nd3 +- But really, after 37.Rf1 and after my analysis, I can objectively say that you have drawing chances! Yes I like my position, I have nice winning chances, but that's not so desesperate for you. Here is my point : 37..Nf4! the knight come back into the game 20 moves later Smiley 38.Nc5+ Kc8 39.Kc2 Qb8! (39..Qe7 40.Re1 Re4 41.Qa8+ Kc7 42.Qb7+ Kd6 43.Nxe4+ dxe4 44.Qb8+ Qc7 45.Qxc7+ Kxc7 46.Rf1 Ne6 47.Rxf7+ Kd6 48.b4 Nd4+ 49.Kd2 Nf5 50.Kc3 etc, and it should not be easy to win because I need to end up with R+p against N to win, that's not an easy task but it doesn't seem impossible.) 40.Re1 Re4 41.Nxe4 dxe4 42.Rxe4 Ne6 43.Qd2 c5 44.Kb2 Qb7 (this line is maybe Black's best chance to draw and I am not really sure that I can convert my advantage into a decisive advantage)

I am interested of your toughts about 37..Nf4! and the lines I gived, to see if you agree with the moves and assesment.

About the opening : 9..Nh5 really deserve respects or even a (!) (other moves than 9..Nh5 is somewhat better
for White) But we have seen one of the drawback of this move : the Knight can stay here for a long time like in this game where he didn't moved one single time after move 9. And my response : 10.Be3 is mostly a positional and solid move, if you compare with my other alternative 10.Nxg6!? hxf6 11.Bd3. I agree with you that you reached equality in the opening, but even if you seemed to control the defense with "easy moves", White's compensation really existed and it's a danger to underestimate that. From a theorical point of view, other players played the same position a few time until move 15, where White always played 15.Rdf1, so my 15.Rhf1 is a novelty, and maybe an improvement (White shouldn't be too affraid to lose the h pawn at that moment, and keep the 2 rooks active)

In conclusion, 9..Nh5 is good, 10.Be3 is solid, positionnal and the position is roughly even, but not very pleasant to play against Black's fortress. Black have a pawn up, a position solid as a rock, but we can't win a game just on staying too solid, they need to liberate their position to show that the pawn up is an advantage, but they liberate White's position also which have dynamic compensations. In the whole game, both side maintened an equality (or a very little advantage for Black.) The position opened, White's dynamical compensation really began to play at this moment(like a delayed compensation, that show that the BDG have somes strategics compensations, mostly the f-file semi-open) but White had just an equality (or very close to..), with nothing more. If Black had not blundered with 32..Re4?, the game would surely have been a draw (32..f6 or 32..f5 were good). So I believe that after 9..Nh5 and 10.Be3 White can draw, but nothing more against the best play, and Black can hope a bit more Smiley but I am not too happy with this idea, even if a draw with the BDG against a strong opponent is not that bad.


  
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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #161 - 09/26/05 at 21:43:58
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My quick and superficial analysis runs 32...f5 33.a4 bxa4 34.Qa5 Kc8 35.Nc5 Re7 36.c4 Nf4 37.cxd5 Nxd5 and I do not see how White can avoid the draw.
  

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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #160 - 09/26/05 at 20:22:56
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1.d4 d5  2. e4 dxe4  3. Nc3 Nf6  4. f3 exf3  5. Nxf3 Bf5  6. Ne5 e6 7.g4 Bg6 8.Qf3 c6  9. g5 Nh5 10.Be3 Nd7 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.Bd3 Bd6 13.Ne4 Bc7  14. O-O-O Qe7 15.Rhf1 Rf8 16.Bd2 0-0-0 17.a3 a5 18.Bc4 Nb6 19.Bb3 Rxd4 20.Bxa5 Rxd1+ 21.Rxd1 Nd5 22.Bxc7 Qxc7 23.Kb1 Qf4 24.Bxd5 exd5 25.Qh3+ Kc7 26.Nc5 Qd6 27.Qe3 b6  28.Na6+ Kb7 29.Nb4 Rd8 30.Qd3 b5 31.Qd2 Re8 32.Nd3 Re4 33.a4 bxa4 34.Qa5 Rc4 35.b3 axb3 36.cxb3 Rd4 37.Rf1 f5

...and resigns. 

Well played, Arkhein.

It seems that I misplayed with 32...Re4.  33. a4! surprised me.  White is winning now, though this sheds scant light on the validity of the line of defense at the 9th move. 

Also 23...Qf4 was perhaps not the best.  After that, I pressed a little too hard to show my winning chances.  My present view is that Black is at least equal after the opening.

  

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Re: ArKheiN - Markovich, 2005, BDG Challenge Match
Reply #159 - 09/26/05 at 13:28:19
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1.d4 d5  2. e4 dxe4  3. Nc3 Nf6  4. f3 exf3  5. Nxf3 Bf5  6. Ne5 e6 7.g4 Bg6 8.Qf3 c6  9. g5 Nh5 10.Be3 Nd7 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.Bd3 Bd6 13.Ne4 Bc7  14. O-O-O Qe7 15.Rhf1 Rf8 16.Bd2 0-0-0 17.a3 a5 18.Bc4 Nb6 19.Bb3 Rxd4 20.Bxa5 Rxd1+ 21.Rxd1 Nd5 22.Bxc7 Qxc7 23.Kb1 Qf4 24.Bxd5 exd5 25.Qh3+ Kc7 26.Nc5 Qd6 27.Qe3 b6  28.Na6+ Kb7 29.Nb4 Rd8 30.Qd3 b5 31.Qd2 Re8 32.Nd3 Re4 33.a4 bxa4 34.Qa5 Rc4 35.b3 axb3 36.cxb3 Rd4 37.Rf1

Not bad was 37.Nc5+ Qxc5 38.Qxc5 Rxd1+ 39.Kc2 Rf1 White have a draw for sure(White can't lose) but it has less winning chances(to not say any) than my move : 37.Rf1
  
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