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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Chekhover variation (Read 11442 times)
basqueknight
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #17 - 09/01/05 at 01:00:47
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A player in michigan by the name of Manis Davidovich plays a lot of fun anti-sicilian lines like the Chekhover and Smith-Morra. His line was similar to the one seth homa postes on. his game ended in a win for him in the usaual way for many he is either on or off. And when he has white you can expect soem fire works. But it looks relatively sound for white and black is not in a forced loss. Both sides have play but whites big lead in development is inspiring. The variation should be looked at more seriously. I ran it thorugh fritz and fritz says broing equality. I say fun chess.
  
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basqueknight
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #16 - 09/01/05 at 00:54:58
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A player in michigan by the name of Manis Davidovich plays a lot of fun anti-sicilian lines like the Chekhover and Smith-Morra. His line was similar to the one seth homa postes on. his game ended in a win for him in the usaual way for many he is either on or off. And when he has white you can expect soem fire works. But it looks relatively sound for white and black is not in a forced loss. Both sides have play but whites big lead in development is inspiring. The variation should be looked at more seriously. I ran it thorugh fritz and fritz says broing equality. I say fun chess.
  
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MNb
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #15 - 08/18/05 at 08:29:02
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Agreed. Of course White can change move order with 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Nc6 (Bd7; Nd7;) 4.d4 cxd4 5.Qxd4. This might be handy, if White also intends to answer 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 with 3.Bb5.
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
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TopNotch
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #14 - 08/17/05 at 22:29:05
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@Seth_Xoma

Chris Baker recommends 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 a6 5.Be3!? and after 5...Nf6 6.Nc3 Ng4!? [A Chris Ward favorite] 7. 0-0-0 Nc6 8.Qb6 Nxe3 9.Qxe3 e6 10.h4 Now Baker claims that White's lead in development compensates for Black's bishop pair, but in the game he cites Grabarczyk-Kempinski, Kosalin 1997 Black won convincingly in 23 moves.

Besides 6...Ng4 Black can also get a satisfactory game with the simple 6...Nc6 as the ending after 7.Qb6 Qxb6 8.Bxb6 Bg4! is not considered dangerous for Black. Alternatively 7.Qd2 e6 8.0-0-0 Be7 9.Bf4 Ng4! [An important resource in this line] has also scored fine for Black.

Conclusion: 5.Be3!? is tricky against an unsuspecting or unprepared opponent, but otherwise its pretty harmless. In my opinion White's best chance of a slight edge against 4...a6 lies in the Maroczy Bind type positions after 5.c4!?.

Topster Grin  
  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
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Scholar
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #13 - 08/17/05 at 19:24:14
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Quote:
Conclusion: 11...h6 is a very interesting move that forces White to abandon the typical manoeuvres usually associated with this line. Nevertheless 11..h6 also has some downsides too, namely, it weakens Black's Kingside and in the event of a White Pawn Storm there greatly accelerates the opponents attacking chances.

Verdict: Only further practical test after 13.h3 will help to clarify the issue, until then an assessment of unclear will have to suffice.


I agree.

As for Seth_Xoma, might I suggest that after 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.e5 dxe5 12.Qh4 Qc7 13.Nxe5

you consider 13...Rac8 planning on meeting 14.Ng4 with Nd5 15.Rxd5 f6

This gives Black full equality in my view, and avoids the forced draw.  I don't play 4...a6 so I have little to suggest there.  But this should give you a way of maintaining your current repetoire choice.

*

As a side note, it would be great to write a repetoire book exclusively advocating lines which force a draw.  It's just a way of being honest with the reader, who probably loses against a superior opponent even if he gets an edge out of the opening.
  
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TopNotch
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #12 - 08/17/05 at 16:55:06
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Quote:
It is always nice to have Kasparov's seal of approval.  I guess that game didn't come up since you only searched your database for ones with a 1-0 result.   Wink

Anyway, as I mentioned in my previous post, I think that 11...h6 is best, and would be interested in reading your thoughts.  I don't think that White is looking at much.  Frankly, I don't even think that White has anything in the main lines; as long as Black doesn't waste his time on needless queen and pawn moves, White's plan is simply too slow.


Ok I have taken a closer look at 11...h6, and what I found curious was that despite Kasparov's employment of the move, it hasn't really caught on.

Kasparov's pawn sac initiated by 17...Be8 against Svidler was quite inspired, and provided full compensation I think, but no more. Svidler could and should have maintained the balance with 22.Red3, admittedly maintaining the balance is hardly a triumph for White.

I also agree with you that 12.Bxf6 leads nowhere for White.

White's looking for an advantage in this line should investigate 13.h3!? further. As yet many games haven't been played with this move but the idea seems promising. White simply wants to play g4 at some point and launch a dangerous Kingside attack now that h6 provides a target to accelerate the attack.

Conclusion: 11...h6 is a very interesting move that forces White to abandon the typical manoeuvres usually associated with this line. Nevertheless 11..h6 also has some downsides too, namely, it weakens Black's Kingside and in the event of a White Pawn Storm there greatly accelerates the opponents attacking chances.

Verdict: Only further practical test after 13.h3 will help to clarify the issue, until then an assessment of unclear will have to suffice.

TN Grin

Postscript: I will address Seth_Zoma's query in my next post, but suffice it to say that what Chris Baker recommends against 4...a6 is not particularly convincing. That should put a smile on your face Grin Cheesy Grin Cheesy

« Last Edit: 08/18/05 at 17:26:40 by TopNotch »  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
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Seth_Xoma
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #11 - 08/17/05 at 11:48:43
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I recently played against 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.e5 dxe5 12.Qh4 Qc7 13.Nxe5 and while I know I'm not worse, when I attempted to neutralize White's attack by exchanging pieces there was no way left for me to play for a win (the game ended in a draw after a pitiful 19 moves). This was against a player 200 USCF points below me, so this was not a very satisfactory result! I've recently found out about 'A Startling Opening Repetoire' (or something) by Chris Baker, and I know my opponent has this book. In fact, he pretty much seems to have memorized it. So now I'm looking at 4...a6!?. The problem is, there seems to be little written about it on this site,  and the annotated games in my Database are 2-3 years old so I don't know the latest word on this line. So I would like to ask a few questions:

1.) Is 4...a6 considered in Chris Baker's book, and if so, what does he recommend or say about it?

2.) I know from briefly skimming through my database that White typically chooses a Maroczy Bind formation, but what about moves like 5.Be3 (possibly planning Qb6) or other non-Maroczy Bind plans? This is where I really haven't seen much written. I suspect my opponent would rather bash my head in without taking much risk rather than take the positional route with 5.c4 so I figure I better know those lines.

3.) What IS the general consensus on 4...a6?



Any help would be much appreciated  Smiley
  
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #10 - 08/16/05 at 01:19:13
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It is always nice to have Kasparov's seal of approval.  I guess that game didn't come up since you only searched your database for ones with a 1-0 result.   Wink

Anyway, as I mentioned in my previous post, I think that 11...h6 is best, and would be interested in reading your thoughts.  I don't think that White is looking at much.  Frankly, I don't even think that White has anything in the main lines; as long as Black doesn't waste his time on needless queen and pawn moves, White's plan is simply too slow.
  
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TopNotch
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #9 - 08/15/05 at 18:13:00
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Quote:
Well TopNotch, thanks for your post, and here are my thoughts.  Let's look at what I think are the two most promising continuations for Black; both deviate from your analysis at move 11.  I should mention that Black can deviate even earlier with 7...h6, but I've never really made a serious study of that move.  10.Qd3 would be White's most important deviation; this was Kamsky's choice and has also been used by J. Polgar on a number of occasions (although she also plays 10.Rhe1).

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.Kb1

And now my choice would be for

11...h6 12.Bh4 Re8 13.Bg3 d5 14.e5 Ne4 15.Nxe4 dxe4 16.Qxd8 Rexd8 17.Nd4 Be8 Svidler-Kasparov

17...Bd5 is a bit antipositional, but also fine 18.Nb5 e3 19.Nc7 Bb4 20.Nxa8 (20.c3 Be4+ 21.Kc1 Rxd1+ 22.Rxd1 Rc8 23.Nb5 Bxg2 24.Nd6 Rc7 25.fxe3 Bc5 26.Bf2 Rd7 27.Rd2 Bd5 28.b4 Bxd6 29.exd6 b5=) 20...Bxe1 21.Rxe1 Bxg2 22.f4 Rxa8 23.Rxe3 Rd8 24.Rd3 Rxd3 25.cxd3=

12.Bxf6 Bxf6 13.Qxd6 Bxc3 14.bxc3 Qb6+ 15.Qb4 Qc7= (15...Qxf2? 16.Qd4 Qxd4 17.cxd4+/=)

12.Bc1 b5 13.e5 dxe5 14.Qxe5 (14.Nxe5 Qc8) 14...Qb8 15.Qxb8 Rfxb8 16.Ne5 Be8=

A more ambitious choice is

11...Rc8!? 12.Qd2 now black has a pleasant choice between 12...b5 and 12...h6 though these lines are rare and lack practical tests

Instead, 12.Qxa7 Nxe4 13.Nxe4 Bxe4 14.Rxe4 Bxg5 15.Rb4 Bf6 (15...Qf6!?) 16.Rxb7 Rc4 17.Qb6 Qc8 18.c3 d5 19.Ra7 Qe8 20.Qb3 Qc6 is interesting

Of the lines that you gave, my preference is for 11...Qc7.  Then following Zelcic-Savanovic the critical question is whether Black can play 15...b4; if so, I think 12...a6 is doing well.  Otherwise, Black should prefer 12...Rfc8 when he may have to defend the draw in an endgame RR pawns v RR pawns-1.

Finally, after 11...Qa5 12.Qd2, I don't think Black is actually worse after either rook move (though moving the queen again is bad).  Indeed, in Yu-Grebionkin, Black looked better for most of it.  As late as move 43, he could have saved the draw with 43...c5.

Improvements?


Of the analysis you gave I am most interested in Kaspoarov's choice, as one has to take careful note of anything he does.

I will take a closer look at 11...h6 and see whether an advantageous plan can be found for White. Regarding your other suggestions, all I can say that it is perhaps more important that White have a clear understanding of what heshe should be doing and where the pieces belong than trying to work everything out till the very end.

Lets be clear though, I'm not saying that 4.Qxd4 or for that matter 4.Nxd4  leads to advantage for White, but rather that the positions after 4.Qxd4 are very easy to play, with White often enjoying a nice lead in development and clear strategic plans to follow.  

I will give 7...h6 a look and post my thoughts on it in due course.

Toppylov Grin
« Last Edit: 08/17/05 at 00:09:35 by TopNotch »  

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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #8 - 08/15/05 at 01:46:47
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Well TopNotch, thanks for your post, and here are my thoughts.  Let's look at what I think are the two most promising continuations for Black; both deviate from your analysis at move 11.  I should mention that Black can deviate even earlier with 7...h6, but I've never really made a serious study of that move.  10.Qd3 would be White's most important deviation; this was Kamsky's choice and has also been used by J. Polgar on a number of occasions (although she also plays 10.Rhe1).

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.Kb1

And now my choice would be for

11...h6 12.Bh4 Re8 13.Bg3 d5 14.e5 Ne4 15.Nxe4 dxe4 16.Qxd8 Rexd8 17.Nd4 Be8 Svidler-Kasparov

17...Bd5 is a bit antipositional, but also fine 18.Nb5 e3 19.Nc7 Bb4 20.Nxa8 (20.c3 Be4+ 21.Kc1 Rxd1+ 22.Rxd1 Rc8 23.Nb5 Bxg2 24.Nd6 Rc7 25.fxe3 Bc5 26.Bf2 Rd7 27.Rd2 Bd5 28.b4 Bxd6 29.exd6 b5=) 20...Bxe1 21.Rxe1 Bxg2 22.f4 Rxa8 23.Rxe3 Rd8 24.Rd3 Rxd3 25.cxd3=

12.Bxf6 Bxf6 13.Qxd6 Bxc3 14.bxc3 Qb6+ 15.Qb4 Qc7= (15...Qxf2? 16.Qd4 Qxd4 17.cxd4+/=)

12.Bc1 b5 13.e5 dxe5 14.Qxe5 (14.Nxe5 Qc8) 14...Qb8 15.Qxb8 Rfxb8 16.Ne5 Be8=

A more ambitious choice is

11...Rc8!? 12.Qd2 now black has a pleasant choice between 12...b5 and 12...h6 though these lines are rare and lack practical tests

Instead, 12.Qxa7 Nxe4 13.Nxe4 Bxe4 14.Rxe4 Bxg5 15.Rb4 Bf6 (15...Qf6!?) 16.Rxb7 Rc4 17.Qb6 Qc8 18.c3 d5 19.Ra7 Qe8 20.Qb3 Qc6 is interesting

Of the lines that you gave, my preference is for 11...Qc7.  Then following Zelcic-Savanovic the critical question is whether Black can play 15...b4; if so, I think 12...a6 is doing well.  Otherwise, Black should prefer 12...Rfc8 when he may have to defend the draw in an endgame RR pawns v RR pawns-1.

Finally, after 11...Qa5 12.Qd2, I don't think Black is actually worse after either rook move (though moving the queen again is bad).  Indeed, in Yu-Grebionkin, Black looked better for most of it.  As late as move 43, he could have saved the draw with 43...c5.

Improvements?
  
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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #7 - 08/14/05 at 04:27:15
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Well, it's interesting that you suggest 11.Kb1.  I think there are a few promising deviations from what you give as the main line (for both sides, but especially for Black), but I'll take a closer look at how play continued in the games you give and post my conclusions later.
  
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TopNotch
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e: Chekhover variation
Reply #6 - 08/14/05 at 01:36:24
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As you wish Scholar. I hope the small sample below proves instructive.  Grin

[Event "Aeroflot Open"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2002.??.??"]
[White "Vasiukov,E"]
[Black "Van Wely,L"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2524"]
[BlackElo "2697"]
[ECO "B53"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 Nc6 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 7. Nc3 Nf6 8. Bg5 e6 9. O-O-O Be7 10. Rhe1 O-O 11. Kb1 [Very important prophylactic move in this line, and I TN consider it the best option at this juncture] Qa5 12. Qd2 Qa6 13. Nd4 Rfc8 14. f4 h6 15. h4 Qc4 16. g4 Kf8 17. f5 hxg5 18. hxg5 Nd7 19. fxe6 Ne5 20. Rh1 fxe6 21. b3 Qb4 22. Rh8+ Kf7 23. Qf4+ Bf6 24. Rh7 Kg8 25. gxf6 Kxh7 26. Qg5 Rc7 27. Nxe6 Rac8 28. fxg7 Kg8 29. Rh1 Bxe4 30. Rh8+ Kf7 31. Nxc7 Qxc3 32. g8=Q+ 1-0

[Event "Eurotel Trophy"]
[Site "Prague"]
[Date "2002.04.28"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Ivanchuk,Vassily"]
[Black "Gelfand,Boris"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B53"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Qxd4 Nc6 6.Bb5 Bd7 7.Bxc6 Bxc6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0
11.Kb1 Qa5 12.Qd2 Rfc8 13.Nd5 Qxd2 14.Nxe7+ Kf8 15.Nxd2 Kxe7 16.f3 h6 17.Bh4 g5 18.Bf2 Bb5 19.b3 Nd7 20.Bd4 Ne5 21.c4 Ba6 22.a4 b6 23.Nf1 Ng6 24.Ne3 Bb7
25.Ng4 h5 26.Bf6+ Kd7 27.Nh6 Rf8 28.e5 d5 29.cxd5 Bxd5 30.Nxf7 g4 31.fxg4 hxg4 32.Nh6 Kc6 33.b4 Bxg2 34.Nxg4 Rac8 35.Rd4 Kb7 36.Ne3 Bh3 37.Kb2 Rc7 38.Nc4 Ka8 39.Red1 Rfc8 40.Rc1 Bf1 41.Rxf1 Rxc4 42.Rxc4 Rxc4 43.Rg1 Nf4 44.Kb3 Re4 45.h4 Nd5 46.b5 Re3+ 47.Kc2 Rh3 48.Rg8+ Kb7 49.Re8 Ne3+ 50.Kd2 Nf5 51.Rxe6 Nxh4 52.Re7+ Kb8 53.e6 Nf5 54.Be5+ Kc8 55.Rc7+ Kd8 56.Rxa7 Re3 57.Bf6+ Kc8 58.e7  1-0

[Event "POL-ch"]
[Site "Warsaw"]
[Date "2004.04.24"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Cyborowski,Lukasz"]
[Black "Lagowski,Patryk"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B53"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Qxd4 Nc6 6.Bb5 Bd7 7.Bxc6 Bxc6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.Kb1 Qa5 12.Qd2 Qb6 13.Nd4 Rac8 14.f3 a5 15.g4 [This is a typical way to conduct the attack and features often in the 4.Qxd4 line, it is usually followed by Nce2-g3-h5 at some point with good attacking chances] 15...a4 16.Be3 Qa6 17.h4 Nd7 18.Bg5 f6 19.Be3 Ne5 20.f4 Nc4 21.Qd3 Bd7 22.f5 Qa5 23.fxe6 Nxb2 24.Kxb2 a3+ 5.Ka1 Rxc3 26.Qd2 f5 27.exd7 Bf6 28.g5 Be5 29.Rb1 f4 30.Bg1 Qc7 31.Rxb7 Qc4 32.Kb1 f3 33.Bf2 Rd8 34.Nb3 Kh8 35.Bb6 Qb4 36.Ba5 Qxb7 37.Bxc3 f2 38.Rf1 Bxc3 39.Qxc3 Qxe4 40.Qd2 Qe5 41.c3 Rxd7 42.Qxf2 Qe4+ 43.Ka1 h5 44.gxh6 gxh6 45.Qd4+  1-0

[Event "Bled op 21st"]
[Site "Bled"]
[Date "2000.03.25"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Zelcic,Robert"]
[Black "Savanovic,Aleksandar"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B53"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.Kb1 Qc7 12.Qd2 a6 13.Nd4 Rfc8 14.f3 b5 15.g4 Ne8 16.h4 Bf8 17.Be3 b4 18.Nce2 a5 19.g5 a4 20.Rc1 Qb7 21.Nxc6 Rxc6 22.h5 b3 23.cxb3 axb3 24.Rxc6 bxa2+ 25.Ka1 Qxc6 26.g6 Nf6 27.gxf7+ Kxf7 28.h6 g6 29.Bg5 Be7 30.Nd4 Qb6 31.Rc1 Rb8 32.Nc6 Rb7 33.Nxe7 Kxe7 34.Qc3 e5 35.f4 Ke6 36.Bxf6 Kxf6 7.fxe5+ dxe5 38.Rf1+ Ke6 39.Qc4+ Kd7 40.Rf7+ Ke8 1-0

[Event "Internet Section 07B g/8'+2""]
[Site "Dos Hermanas"]
[Date "2004.03.07"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Yu Shaoteng"]
[Black "Grebionkin,Vladimir"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B53"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 d6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Qxd4 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 e6 8.Bg5 Nf6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.Kb1 Qa5 12.Qd2 Rfd8 13.Nd5 Qxd2 14.Nxe7+ Kf8 15.Rxd2 Kxe7 16.Nd4 h6 17.Nxc6+ bxc6 18.Bh4 g5 19.Bg3 e5 20.f3 Nh5 21.Bf2 Nf4 22.Be3 f6 23.Red1 Rd7 24.g3 Ne6 25.h4 gxh4 26.gxh4 Rg8 27.h5 Ng5 28.Rd3 Ke6 29.Bd2 d5 30.a4 f5 31.exf5+ Kxf5 32.Rc3 Rd6 33.b4 d4 34.Rd3 Nh3 35.Rf1 Nf4 36.Bxf4 Kxf4 37.Re1 Rg3 38.Re4+ Kf5 39.c3 Rxf3 40.Rxe5+ Kxe5 41.Rxf3 Ke4 42.Rg3 Rd5 43.Kc2 dxc3 44.Rxc3 Rxh5 45.Rxc6 Kd4 46.b5 Rh3 47.Rc7 Rh2+ 48.Kb3 Rh3+ 49.Kb4 Rh1 50.Rxa7 Rb1+ 51.Ka5 h5 52.Rh7 Rh1 53.Kb6 h4 54.a5 h3 55.a6 h2 56.a7 Rg1 57.Rxh2 Rg6+ 58.Ka5 Rg1 59.b6 Kc5 60.Rc2+ Kd6 61.b7 Ra1+ 62.Kb4 Rb1+ 63.Kc4  1-0

[Event "Tivat op"]
[Site "Tivat"]
[Date "1995.??.??"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Vasiukov,Evgeni"]
[Black "Savanovic,Aleksandar"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B53"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 Nc6 5.Bb5 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.Kb1 Qc7 12.Qd2 Rfd8 13.Nd4 Rab8 14.f3 b5 15.g4 b4 16.Nce2 a5 17.Ng3 [Here we see the usual attacking recipe demonstrated by the master himself] Be8 18.Nh5 Nxh5 19.gxh5 Rdc8 20.Rg1 a4 21.h4 a3 22.b3 Kf8 3.Rg2 Bf6 24.Bxf6 gxf6 25.h6 Qc5 26.Rg7 Qe5 27.Re1 Rc3 28.f4 Qc5 29.e5 Bb5 30.Nxb5 Rxb5 31.Rxh7 Ke7
32.exd6+  
1-0

[Event "Corus-B"]
[Site "Wijk aan Zee"]
[Date "2004.01.10"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Stellwagen,Daniel"]
[Black "Tiviakov,Sergei"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B53"]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 d6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Qxd4 Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e6 9.0-0-0 Be7 10.Rhe1 0-0 11.Kb1 Qc7 12.Qd2 Rfd8 13.Nd4 Rab8 14.f3 b5 15.g4 Be8 16.Nce2 h6 17.Be3 d5 18.e5! [The thematic response in this and similiar positions, the tactical idea being that Qxe5 loses the Black Queen to Bf4 and the strategic idea is to keep the position closed. Take careful note of this idea, as its quite an important one to understand if you want success with this line]  Nd7 19.Nf4 Nb6 20.Nh5 Nc4 21.Qc1 Kh7 22.f4 b4 23.f5 Rdc8 24.f6 gxf6 25.Bxh6 Na3+ 26.bxa3 fxe5 27.Bg7 bxa3+ 28.Nb3 Bg5 29.Bxe5 Qd8 30.Qxa3 a5 31.Qf8 Bh6 32.Qh8+ Kg6 33.Qg8+  1-0

Anyone seriously interested in this 4.Qxd4 line should make a careful study of GM Evgeni Vasiukov games, as the old guy is the Guru of this system. I am not saying that I agree with Kamsky that 4. Qxd4 is as effective as 4. Nxd4 but it is certainly a useful weapon to include in ones repertoire, if only for occasional use.

Toppylov  Grin

  

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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #5 - 08/14/05 at 00:31:14
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I am quite skeptical that White can generate much of an attack after 4...Nc6.  It's almost laughable to suggest that White can get a better attack from Qxd4 than Nxd4 -- I'm no Kamsky, but I think that the Sicilian mainlines generally give White a decent attack.

I'd be interested in seeing if you have anything in particular in mind for White after 4...Nc6 -- nothing I've seen suggests that Black has to put up with more than minor inconveniences.
  
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I only look 1 move ahead,
but its always the best

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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #4 - 08/13/05 at 23:23:17
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Quote:
I mean the game that occures after 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 !?

What do you think about it ?


I think its an interesting departure from the mainline,  and Gata Kamsky once said that he thought it was as good as 4.Nxd4. Of course thats open for debate.

I myself play 4.Qxd4 from time to time, and for me its main attraction is its rapid development and the ready made just add water attacks that White can often effortlessly whip up.

Conclusion: 4.Qxd4 is quite promising for occasional use, but isn't startegically or tactically diverse enough to employ as a main weapon. In otherwords a well prepared Black player should be able to neutralize it relatively easily with precise play. Black should prefer 4...a6 or 4...Bd7 instead of the more commonly recommended 4...Nc6 in my opinion. 4...Nc6 though theoretically approved, gives White very thematic and dangerous attacking possibilities as described in the previous paragraph.

Topalot  Grin   
  

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Re: Chekhover variation
Reply #3 - 08/06/05 at 04:05:17
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No problem...it probably should have been in this section anyway.
  
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