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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Game collections (Read 62042 times)
an ordinary chessplayer
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Re: Game collections
Reply #120 - 09/08/20 at 15:46:03
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In fact at least 5 just in English. Who knows how many in other languages? Your observed Harding/Simpole appears to be a reprint of #2 in the below link. I don't think that counts as number 6.
https://chessbookchats.blogspot.com/2016/01/neuhausan-zurich-1953-candidates.htm...
  
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JonathanB
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Re: Game collections
Reply #119 - 09/08/20 at 13:26:24
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bragesjo wrote on 07/30/20 at 18:30:08:
To many posts to read but Zurich 53 books are a bit speical. There exist no less than 4 book about it ....


In fact at least 5
http://www.hardingesimpole.co.uk/biblio/1843820854.htm

I once saw a copy of this secondhand at Chess & Bridge in Baker Street, London. I didn't buy it on principle (the principle of not spending money on Hardinge and Simpole's shite), but in retrospect I regret it as it was only a few pounds and in good nick. Also as it was second hand H/S wouldn't have got the money.

I do already have two of the four books you mentioned though so perhaps a third would have been greedy.


I'm very much enjoying Jimmy Adams' translation of Boleslavsky's 100 Selected Games (I think that's the title).  Great games and a very well produced book.
  

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bragesjo
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Re: Game collections
Reply #118 - 07/30/20 at 18:30:08
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To many posts to read but Zurich 53 books are a bit speical. There exist no less than 4 book about it. Bronsteins version, Najdorfs version, Euwes version and Ståhlbergs version. I have manage to get lucky to own a copy of each of them. However Euwes verson and Ståhlbergs verson are not in english, Ståhbergs are in swedish and Euves version in some other language. Bronsteins vesion is the most classical of the books.
  
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LeeRoth
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Re: Game collections
Reply #117 - 07/29/20 at 11:57:43
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 07/27/20 at 19:42:20:
The OP asked about favorites. Your longer list has titles of interest, but they cannot all be favorites.


They are all favorites in one sense or another.  Some for sentimental reasons.  But I gave a top 10 earlier in the thread (#79).  Not sure if it would be the same today, but close enough.   Wink


  
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cathexis
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Re: Game collections
Reply #116 - 07/29/20 at 03:52:52
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@AOC,

I have to thank you for steering me to the start of this thread. I can't read it slowly enough. It's that good. Hope you understand.

Andrew
  
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an ordinary chessplayer
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Re: Game collections
Reply #115 - 07/27/20 at 22:06:32
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LeeRoth wrote on 07/27/20 at 20:01:24:
When I was starting out, a local master advised me to study these three books in order (1) Morphy’s Games of Chess, (2) Alekhine’s My Best Games, and (3) Zurich 1953.  All three books were available at the local bookstore, and he claimed they were all anyone needed to see how chess developed from classical times to the modern age.

I don't think that was true even in 1953.
  
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LeeRoth
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Re: Game collections
Reply #114 - 07/27/20 at 20:01:24
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Yup, I was trying to go by player.  If you want to include tournament books or expand the list to include any type of game collection, Zurich 1953 would definitely be there.

When I was starting out, a local master advised me to study these three books in order (1) Morphy’s Games of Chess, (2) Alekhine’s My Best Games, and (3) Zurich 1953.  All three books were available at the local bookstore, and he claimed they were all anyone needed to see how chess developed from classical times to the modern age.







  
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an ordinary chessplayer
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Re: Game collections
Reply #113 - 07/27/20 at 19:42:20
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cathexis wrote on 07/27/20 at 17:53:57:
So would, Zurich 1953 not qualify as it is not one particular player's games?

Correct. See the original post. And Zurich 1953 was already mentioned in Reply #2 with the same question. Reply #3 answered.

LeeRoth wrote on 07/27/20 at 16:38:49:
The short list used to be:
  1. Tarrasch's 300 Games
  2. Alekhine's My Best Games
  3. Fischer's 60 Memorable
  4. Tal's Life and Games

That's a great short list. I first read them in the order 2, 3, 4, 1, and I rank them most favorite to least as 3, 4, 1, 2. But a large part of that has to be my very young age when I read them. For example, The Test of Time I read when I was much older, and could not separate Kasparov's personality from his writings. So if someone picks up Fischer's book today, or indeed any strong personality's book, and has a similar reaction, I can sympathize. But I think it hurt me as a player not to study Kasparov's games deeply. Anyone who ignores Fischer's games is also making a mistake.

Somewhere on the web My 60 Memorable Games was called "over-rated". This kind of criticism I dismiss out of hand. If many people rate a book as #1 and I rate it as #20, or even as #2, of course I would think it's over-rated. Saying so adds zero to the discussion. Better to give some reasons.

The OP asked about favorites. Your longer list has titles of interest, but they cannot all be favorites.
  
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cathexis
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Re: Game collections
Reply #112 - 07/27/20 at 17:53:57
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So would, Zurich 1953 not qualify as it is not one particular player's games?
  
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LeeRoth
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Re: Game collections
Reply #111 - 07/27/20 at 16:38:49
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The short list used to be:

Tarrasch's 300 Games
Alekhine's My Best Games
Fischer's 60 Memorable
Tal's Life and Games

To that list, I would add (trying to limit to one book for each player):

Sergeant, Morphy's Games of Chess
Soltis, Frank Marshall
Donaldson/Minev books on Rubinstein
Chernev, Capablanca’s Best Chess Endings
Golombek, Capablanca's Best Games
Tartakower, My Best Games of Chess 1905-1954
Botvinnik’s Best Games vol 1-3
Smyslov, My Best Games of Chess 1935-1957
Bronstein, The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
Tal, Tal-Botvinnik 1960
Keres, Road to the Top/Quest for Chess Perfection
Kotov, Grandmaster at Work
Vasiliev, Tigran Petrosian His life and Games
Larsen, Bent Larsen’s Best Games
Cafferty, Spassky’s 100 Best Games
Karpov's My Best Games
Karolyi, Karpov's Strategic Wins
Varnusz, Selected Games of Lajos Portisch
Gligoric, I Play the Pieces
Kasparov, on Gary Kasparov
Shirov, Fire on Board
Benko, My Life, Games and Compositions
Griffiths/Nunn, Secrets of Grandmaster Chess
Nunn, John Nunn's Best Games
Speelman, Jon Speelman’s Best Games
Taimanov, Taimanov’s Selected Games
Geller, Application of Chess Theory (don't have Nemesis yet)
Anand, My Best Games
Kramnik, My Life and Games
Nesis, Khalifman's Life and Games


  
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LeeRoth
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Re: Game collections
Reply #110 - 07/27/20 at 16:04:37
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The Test of Time is an all-time classic.  When it first came out, it was one of my favorite chess books, and one of the few that I read cover-to-cover.  Kasparov has probably since covered a lot of the games in his later books, but I still think the Test of Time is worth having.



  
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cathexis
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Re: Game collections
Reply #109 - 07/27/20 at 14:27:11
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How is Kasparov's, "The Test of Time" generally viewed?

It is very expensive, even as a used paperback. So when I saw a price for a copy in very good condition on Ebay for a third the going price most places, I pounced. I figured even if over my head now, it can only get rarer. And I take very good care of all my books for all subjects. The seller has lots of other used titles and is part of a sale by the "Manitoba Chess Hall of Fame and Museum Inc." that I stumbled onto. In case others are curious here's a link:

https://www.ebay.com/sch/pean64/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=

If that link burps since I keep myself logged in, the seller is pean64.

FWIW,

Andrew
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #108 - 07/27/20 at 03:17:29
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What a great thread!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #107 - 07/27/20 at 02:43:22
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 07/26/20 at 05:53:43:
Thanks for pointing out the Euwe book. I haven't seen anything in English before. I did read Richter/Teschner (1964) Dr. Max Euwe: Auswahl Seiner Besten Partien, (the web says "Eine Auswahl ...", my edition did not) but I could not call it a "best" best games collection. My German is not good enough to judge that!

I hadn't heard of Alexander Münninghof. He apparently just passed away in April. On the New in Chess site the blurb calls the Euwe book a "gripping story", which must be a fib. But I will probably get it anyway, just to get Euwe's own annotations.

My pleasure. It's a lot less of a fib than one would think. It's a real biography, one that would be good even without the games. There are stories of Euwe being brave as a civilian supporting the resistance in WWII, suspenseful round-by-round coverage of tournaments like Groningen 1946, evocations of his character as a math student and teacher, psychological insights, and more. Granted, Euwe was no Lord Byron, so there's a limit to how gripping it can be. As Fischer's quipped,  "something's wrong with that guy--he's too normal!"

My German is not that great either. One witty thing in Tarrasch that might have mystified me no matter how big a vocabulary I had was his comment on a move refuting an opponent's idea: "that was the poodle's core!" What an expression!  I remembered it's what Faust says when he succeeds in forcing a supernatural being to emerge from its disguise as a poodle and a mere traveling scholar steps out--but it's really Mephistopheles. How to translate that?  (Looking it up, I see it is a perfectly ordinary expression that usually means "the heart of the matter," but here it's great writing because a devilish move has just appeared on the board.) Other things I never figured out.

@RoleyPoley--I know, so many great books out of print. Now if I just had time to read the ones I own cover-to-cover...but in my life I have rarely read anything cover-to-cover, chess or not. I just picked up a copy of Averbach's game collection. He seems like a modest, but erudite scientist. I'm looking forward to playing through his endgames, though he went out of his way to showcase his middlegame skills, too. Still looking for a copy of Gligoric.
« Last Edit: 07/27/20 at 15:16:12 by ReneDescartes »  
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Re: Game collectio
Reply #106 - 07/26/20 at 10:29:51
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ReneDescartes wrote on 07/26/20 at 02:41:44:
Gee, it's fun thinking of an answer to this. My list changes over time as I develop enthusiasms. Here are some current favorites.
  • Beim, Paul Morphy: A Modern Perspective
  • Tarrasch, his own 55 or so games from Die moderne Schachpartie (German only; written to be "like my 300 Games, but much more instructive," i.e. for a more general audience)
  • Donaldson and Minev, Akiva Rubinstein, Uncrowned King, Vol. 1
  • Golombek, Capablanca's Best Games,
  • Botvinnik's Best Games, Vol. 1-3 (annotations are similar to the descriptive-notation Dover 100 games, but reworded, occasionallly updated and cross-indexed with the other volumes, as in "I used x method, which we have already described in in game y").
  • Keres, The Road to the Top
  • Karpov, My Best Games (1978)--he wrote this one in the run-up to the Baguio City Korchnoi match. Not as dry as the later collections, written for a less expert audience.
.
Some collections I am currently disenchanted with: I find it hard to make myself read Alekhine's games since his annotations are so dishonest, though I know I should. Tal is a great writer, but I can't make myself root for his unsound play. Kasparov's annotations are extremely variation-heavy, and it's hard to forget that he's been personally rude to me just as he has to so many others.

Someone asked about Euwe. There is a biography by Münninghof, with game annotations by Euwe. It's well-written and entertaining, but I haven't gone through games from it yet.


It's a real shame some of these books are not re-released, and in the case of the Tarrasch book, published in english.
  

"As Mikhail Tal would say ' Let's have a bit of hooliganism! '"

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