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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Game collections (Read 66588 times)
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Re: Game collections
Reply #135 - 02/18/21 at 18:51:33
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My "most" favourite were the Keres early/middle/later years set, in descriptive, but they were classic books and these were my first introduction to the game.

Some of the modern players sets' are quite good, of which I like three in particular of the ones I've read:

(1) "My Magic Years with Topalov" by Edouard, though my choice is heavily influenced by Topalov's uncompromising style 

(2) Gelfand's series of books which are almost the opposite extreme in style but nevertheless very, very interesting to play over slowly and repeatedly.

(3) Kamsky's two books are very good, written in a similar style to Keres, e.g. scene-setting then the emotions of the game as it happened as well as the analysis.

Just my tuppenceworth.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #134 - 09/20/20 at 19:02:34
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bragesjo wrote on 09/18/20 at 10:51:14:
... the book uses the old style Englisch notation so I can not read it.



I see this kind of thing quite often and it always makes me sad.

Up to you of course, but it's not that difficult to learn descriptive notation. And there are so many fabulous books in the old notation it's really worth putting in the effort.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #133 - 09/18/20 at 10:51:14
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Bad luck with Woods Zurich book. The book is unique author and is not a translation of any other books. But the book uses the old style Englisch notation so I can not read it. So I will only read the swedish book.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #132 - 09/11/20 at 12:19:03
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It appers that I looked to hasty, one of the books turned out to be an e-book with the same cover as the one I own and the paper book had changed cover but same title. A swedish book shop has these english versions by Bronstein. The store also has Bronsteins book in german (Das Kandidatenturnier Zürich 1953).

* Zurich International Chess Tournament, 1953. This first I got of my Zurich  books, bought at Chessstore duirng tournament. Now also exist as - E-bok. The none ebook had different cover than the one I own.
* World Chess Championship Candidates Tournament Zurich 1953

* I found The Chess Struggle in Practice, Lessons from the famous Zurich Candidates tournament 1953 as 2nd hand book at an other site.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #131 - 09/11/20 at 02:46:39
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https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Бронштейн,_Давид_Ионович

I tried the same. The link works fine in the previewer, but once posted the BBS software changes it so it no longer works.

Here's the correct link, but it's not legible.
https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%91%D1%80%D0%BE%D0%BD%D1%88%D1%82%D0%B5%D0%B9%D...

https://graphemica.com/ш
https://graphemica.com/%D1%88
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #130 - 09/11/20 at 00:12:45
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Stigma wrote on 09/08/20 at 20:11:45:
I read through the blog article and only see four independent books in English. So I guess you are counting the two translations of Bronstein separately.

I count them separately; not in the sense that if you have one you would want the other; but in the sense that if you have neither then you would like to know which one, if either, you should prefer to get. I have the McKay edition (Freedman translator, Hochberg editor) and not the Dover. The McKay translation seems fine, although I can't say if it's better. But I always preferred the Dover bindings. The binding on my McKay from the 1978 printing is coming apart. I have much older Dover books which are still intact.

No doubt most here have a database with all these games. But for the rare bird who doesn't:
https://pgnmentor.com/events/Candidates1953.pgn
http://billwall.phpwebhosting.com/collections/Zurich_1953.pgn
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #129 - 09/10/20 at 23:24:04
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bragesjo wrote on 09/10/20 at 19:25:43:
By the way are there any difference between Bronsteins different Zurich works? It looks like there are a least 3 different titles avalble of the same book. One example are "The Chess Struggle in Practice. Lessons from the famous Zurich Candidates tournament 1953" must be the same book as the other as well? In that case the book has at least 4 titles in english that are the same book.

The link given earlier by an ordinary chessplayer had quite a bit of information on the Bronstein translations: https://chessbookchats.blogspot.com/2016/01/neuhausan-zurich-1953-candidates.htm...
But it only mentions two versions in English: The McKay edition translated by Freedman and Hochberg is the one you just mentioned (The Chess Struggle in Practice), and the other is the Dover edition translated by Marfia. I dont know how you get to four.

The Dover edition is the only one I have on Zürich 1953, at least in English, and I still haven't read it. But online I found info on an abbreviated German edition of Bronstein's book that looked eerily familiar: Sternstunden des Schachs. Zürich 1953. Sportverlag, Berlin, 1983/1991. I had forgotten about it, but now I'm almost certain I owned that book at one point and got rid of it or put it in an attic when I bought the more complete Dover edition.

Wikipedia mentions three editions of Bronstein's Zürich book in Russian. The Marfia translation is from the 2nd edition (1960). Probably the Hochberg translation is too, but I don't know that.

Quote:
Международный турнир гроссмейстеров : Комментарии к партиям турнира претендентов на матч с чемпионом мира. Нейгаузен — Цюрих, 29 августа — 24 октября 1953 г. — Москва : Физкультура и спорт, 1956. — 436 с (2-е изд. 1960; 3-е изд. 1983)

Source: https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Бронштейн,_Давид_Ионович

(that Wikipedia link doesn't seem to work. I have probably mixed two character sets in a way you're not supposed to in my striving to make it look correct here.)

bragesjo wrote on 09/10/20 at 19:59:51:
It has been a very long time since I read any Zurich book I got inspired now.  I will probely read the book I ordered and then browse throught the swedish book as well.

Inspired is good! I should get around to reading Bronstein's book myself; have had it on my shelf for more than 15 years.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #128 - 09/10/20 at 19:59:51
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It has been a very long time since I read any Zurich book I got inspired now.  I will probely read the book I ordered and then browse throught the swedish book as well.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #127 - 09/10/20 at 19:25:43
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Stigma wrote on 09/10/20 at 01:49:57:
Thanks. I thought maybe there was a foreword explaining how the work was shared between the authors, but I guess that's more of a modern thing to do. Though the German-language book is quite specific on who did what, with Keres analyzing opening novelties while Euwe handled the rest of the game comments.


Actually there are are are theoretical overview the Swedish in the book far back in the book that I did not notice before. It is specified that Keres made that part alone. Maybee recycle it and translated into Swedish?

By the way I found a reprint of "World Championship Candidates' Tournament - Switzerland 1953" by Wood at a online shop so I ordred it to complete my collection.

By the way are there any difference between Bronsteins different Zurich works? It looks like there are a least 3 different titles avalble of the same book. One example are "The Chess Struggle in Practice. Lessons from the famous Zurich Candidates tournament 1953" must be the same book as the other as well? In that case the book has at least 4 titles in english that are the same book.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #126 - 09/10/20 at 01:49:57
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bragesjo wrote on 09/09/20 at 14:01:13:
About Ståhlbergs book yes Keres is co author. Did not notice it before.

It is impossible to tell who wrote each comment.Ståhlberg probebly translated Keres words anyway to give the book the same word style.

Thanks. I thought maybe there was a foreword explaining how the work was shared between the authors, but I guess that's more of a modern thing to do. Though the German-language book is quite specific on who did what, with Keres analyzing opening novelties while Euwe handled the rest of the game comments.

bragesjo wrote on 09/09/20 at 14:01:13:
The book has few concrete lines and mostly verbal comments.

Not that surprising. It has roughly the same number of pages as the more well-known Zürich 1953 books even though it also covers the 1954 match. So something has to give.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #125 - 09/09/20 at 14:01:13
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About Ståhlbergs book yes Keres is co author. Did not notice it before.

It is impossible to tell who wrote each comment.Ståhlberg probebly translated Keres words anyway to give the book the same word style. The book has few concrete lines and mostly verbal comments.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #124 - 09/08/20 at 23:01:08
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 09/08/20 at 20:48:26:
Quote:
Schach-Elite im Kampf
Bearbeitung der 210 Partien durch Max Euwe, mit Analysen der Neuerungen in den Eröffnungen von Paul Keres, mit Runden- und Rahmenberichten von Paul Lange.


Quote:
Världsschackturneringen Neuhausen-Zürich 1953
med kommentarer och analyser av Gideon Ståhlberg och Paul Keres


Another question is if Keres's contribution to both books is actually the same (except for translation, of course).

Good question. It's quite likely they are the same. And then the question arises whether Keres also contributed to the second part of the Swedish book - on Botvinnik vs Smyslov 1954 - or Ståhlberg wrote that part on his own. Maybe bragesjo can enlighten us on how much of the work was by Keres.

I also wondered why I didn't find any info on the Euwe book in Dutch when googling. It seems to be have been written in German. Or, if Euwe wrote in Dutch, his text was translated into German without being published in Dutch. Is there a Dutch edition of the book out there, perhaps one published later?
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #123 - 09/08/20 at 20:48:26
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Quote:
Schach-Elite im Kampf
Bearbeitung der 210 Partien durch Max Euwe, mit Analysen der Neuerungen in den Eröffnungen von Paul Keres, mit Runden- und Rahmenberichten von Paul Lange.


Quote:
Världsschackturneringen Neuhausen-Zürich 1953
med kommentarer och analyser av Gideon Ståhlberg och Paul Keres


Another question is if Keres's contribution to both books is actually the same (except for translation, of course).
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #122 - 09/08/20 at 20:17:52
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bragesjo wrote on 07/30/20 at 18:30:08:
To many posts to read but Zurich 53 books are a bit speical. There exist no less than 4 book about it. Bronsteins version, Najdorfs version, Euwes version and Ståhlbergs version. I have manage to get lucky to own a copy of each of them. However Euwes verson and Ståhlbergs verson are not in english, Ståhbergs are in swedish and Euves version in some other language. Bronsteins vesion is the most classical of the books.

How good is Ståhlberg's book? And is the bibliographical information I just posted correct; that it is co-authored with Keres and covers both Zürich 1953 and the 1954 World Championship match, presumably in one volume?
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #121 - 09/08/20 at 20:11:45
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 09/08/20 at 15:46:03:
In fact at least 5 just in English. Who knows how many in other languages? Your observed Harding/Simpole appears to be a reprint of #2 in the below link. I don't think that counts as number 6.
https://chessbookchats.blogspot.com/2016/01/neuhausan-zurich-1953-candidates.htm...


I read through the blog article and only see four independent books in English. So I guess you are counting the two translations of Bronstein separately.

So in languages other than English (original) we apparently have:

Euwe (with Keres and Lange) (1954) - German
Najdorf (1954) - Spanish
Keres and Ståhlberg (1954) - Swedish
Bronstein (1956) - Russian


Any others?


Quote:
Schach-Elite im Kampf;
Turnierbuch über das Weltmeisterschafts-Kandidatenturnier, 1953, in Neuhausen am Rheinfall und Zürich;
Bearbeitung der 210 Partien durch Max Euwe, mit Analysen der Neuerungen in den Eröffnungen von Paul Keres, mit Runden- und Rahmenberichten von Paul Lange.
Lange, Paul. , Keres, Paul 1916-1975., Euwe, Max 1901-
German
Zürich, Artemis [1954]
379 p.

Source: https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/002192759



Quote:
Världsschackturneringen Neuhausen-Zürich 1953 ; Världsmästarmatchen Moskva 1954 : Turneringsbok / utg. av Sveriges schackförbund ; med kommentarer och analyser av Gideon Ståhlberg och Paul Keres
    Keres, Paul, 1916-1975 (kommentator)
    Ståhlberg, Gideon, 1908-1967 (kommentator)
[Stockholm] : Sveriges schackförb., 1954
Svenska 351 s.

Source: http://libris.kb.se/bib/1468723
« Last Edit: 09/08/20 at 23:50:40 by Stigma »  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #120 - 09/08/20 at 15:46:03
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In fact at least 5 just in English. Who knows how many in other languages? Your observed Harding/Simpole appears to be a reprint of #2 in the below link. I don't think that counts as number 6.
https://chessbookchats.blogspot.com/2016/01/neuhausan-zurich-1953-candidates.htm...
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #119 - 09/08/20 at 13:26:24
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bragesjo wrote on 07/30/20 at 18:30:08:
To many posts to read but Zurich 53 books are a bit speical. There exist no less than 4 book about it ....


In fact at least 5
http://www.hardingesimpole.co.uk/biblio/1843820854.htm

I once saw a copy of this secondhand at Chess & Bridge in Baker Street, London. I didn't buy it on principle (the principle of not spending money on Hardinge and Simpole's shite), but in retrospect I regret it as it was only a few pounds and in good nick. Also as it was second hand H/S wouldn't have got the money.

I do already have two of the four books you mentioned though so perhaps a third would have been greedy.


I'm very much enjoying Jimmy Adams' translation of Boleslavsky's 100 Selected Games (I think that's the title).  Great games and a very well produced book.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #118 - 07/30/20 at 18:30:08
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To many posts to read but Zurich 53 books are a bit speical. There exist no less than 4 book about it. Bronsteins version, Najdorfs version, Euwes version and Ståhlbergs version. I have manage to get lucky to own a copy of each of them. However Euwes verson and Ståhlbergs verson are not in english, Ståhbergs are in swedish and Euves version in some other language. Bronsteins vesion is the most classical of the books.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #117 - 07/29/20 at 11:57:43
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 07/27/20 at 19:42:20:
The OP asked about favorites. Your longer list has titles of interest, but they cannot all be favorites.


They are all favorites in one sense or another.  Some for sentimental reasons.  But I gave a top 10 earlier in the thread (#79).  Not sure if it would be the same today, but close enough.   Wink


  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #116 - 07/29/20 at 03:52:52
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@AOC,

I have to thank you for steering me to the start of this thread. I can't read it slowly enough. It's that good. Hope you understand.

Andrew
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #115 - 07/27/20 at 22:06:32
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LeeRoth wrote on 07/27/20 at 20:01:24:
When I was starting out, a local master advised me to study these three books in order (1) Morphy’s Games of Chess, (2) Alekhine’s My Best Games, and (3) Zurich 1953.  All three books were available at the local bookstore, and he claimed they were all anyone needed to see how chess developed from classical times to the modern age.

I don't think that was true even in 1953.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #114 - 07/27/20 at 20:01:24
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Yup, I was trying to go by player.  If you want to include tournament books or expand the list to include any type of game collection, Zurich 1953 would definitely be there.

When I was starting out, a local master advised me to study these three books in order (1) Morphy’s Games of Chess, (2) Alekhine’s My Best Games, and (3) Zurich 1953.  All three books were available at the local bookstore, and he claimed they were all anyone needed to see how chess developed from classical times to the modern age.







  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #113 - 07/27/20 at 19:42:20
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cathexis wrote on 07/27/20 at 17:53:57:
So would, Zurich 1953 not qualify as it is not one particular player's games?

Correct. See the original post. And Zurich 1953 was already mentioned in Reply #2 with the same question. Reply #3 answered.

LeeRoth wrote on 07/27/20 at 16:38:49:
The short list used to be:
  1. Tarrasch's 300 Games
  2. Alekhine's My Best Games
  3. Fischer's 60 Memorable
  4. Tal's Life and Games

That's a great short list. I first read them in the order 2, 3, 4, 1, and I rank them most favorite to least as 3, 4, 1, 2. But a large part of that has to be my very young age when I read them. For example, The Test of Time I read when I was much older, and could not separate Kasparov's personality from his writings. So if someone picks up Fischer's book today, or indeed any strong personality's book, and has a similar reaction, I can sympathize. But I think it hurt me as a player not to study Kasparov's games deeply. Anyone who ignores Fischer's games is also making a mistake.

Somewhere on the web My 60 Memorable Games was called "over-rated". This kind of criticism I dismiss out of hand. If many people rate a book as #1 and I rate it as #20, or even as #2, of course I would think it's over-rated. Saying so adds zero to the discussion. Better to give some reasons.

The OP asked about favorites. Your longer list has titles of interest, but they cannot all be favorites.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #112 - 07/27/20 at 17:53:57
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So would, Zurich 1953 not qualify as it is not one particular player's games?
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #111 - 07/27/20 at 16:38:49
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The short list used to be:

Tarrasch's 300 Games
Alekhine's My Best Games
Fischer's 60 Memorable
Tal's Life and Games

To that list, I would add (trying to limit to one book for each player):

Sergeant, Morphy's Games of Chess
Soltis, Frank Marshall
Donaldson/Minev books on Rubinstein
Chernev, Capablanca’s Best Chess Endings
Golombek, Capablanca's Best Games
Tartakower, My Best Games of Chess 1905-1954
Botvinnik’s Best Games vol 1-3
Smyslov, My Best Games of Chess 1935-1957
Bronstein, The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
Tal, Tal-Botvinnik 1960
Keres, Road to the Top/Quest for Chess Perfection
Kotov, Grandmaster at Work
Vasiliev, Tigran Petrosian His life and Games
Larsen, Bent Larsen’s Best Games
Cafferty, Spassky’s 100 Best Games
Karpov's My Best Games
Karolyi, Karpov's Strategic Wins
Varnusz, Selected Games of Lajos Portisch
Gligoric, I Play the Pieces
Kasparov, on Gary Kasparov
Shirov, Fire on Board
Benko, My Life, Games and Compositions
Griffiths/Nunn, Secrets of Grandmaster Chess
Nunn, John Nunn's Best Games
Speelman, Jon Speelman’s Best Games
Taimanov, Taimanov’s Selected Games
Geller, Application of Chess Theory (don't have Nemesis yet)
Anand, My Best Games
Kramnik, My Life and Games
Nesis, Khalifman's Life and Games


  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #110 - 07/27/20 at 16:04:37
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The Test of Time is an all-time classic.  When it first came out, it was one of my favorite chess books, and one of the few that I read cover-to-cover.  Kasparov has probably since covered a lot of the games in his later books, but I still think the Test of Time is worth having.



  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #109 - 07/27/20 at 14:27:11
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How is Kasparov's, "The Test of Time" generally viewed?

It is very expensive, even as a used paperback. So when I saw a price for a copy in very good condition on Ebay for a third the going price most places, I pounced. I figured even if over my head now, it can only get rarer. And I take very good care of all my books for all subjects. The seller has lots of other used titles and is part of a sale by the "Manitoba Chess Hall of Fame and Museum Inc." that I stumbled onto. In case others are curious here's a link:

https://www.ebay.com/sch/pean64/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=

If that link burps since I keep myself logged in, the seller is pean64.

FWIW,

Andrew
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #108 - 07/27/20 at 03:17:29
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What a great thread!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #107 - 07/27/20 at 02:43:22
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an ordinary chessplayer wrote on 07/26/20 at 05:53:43:
Thanks for pointing out the Euwe book. I haven't seen anything in English before. I did read Richter/Teschner (1964) Dr. Max Euwe: Auswahl Seiner Besten Partien, (the web says "Eine Auswahl ...", my edition did not) but I could not call it a "best" best games collection. My German is not good enough to judge that!

I hadn't heard of Alexander Münninghof. He apparently just passed away in April. On the New in Chess site the blurb calls the Euwe book a "gripping story", which must be a fib. But I will probably get it anyway, just to get Euwe's own annotations.

My pleasure. It's a lot less of a fib than one would think. It's a real biography, one that would be good even without the games. There are stories of Euwe being brave as a civilian supporting the resistance in WWII, suspenseful round-by-round coverage of tournaments like Groningen 1946, evocations of his character as a math student and teacher, psychological insights, and more. Granted, Euwe was no Lord Byron, so there's a limit to how gripping it can be. As Fischer's quipped,  "something's wrong with that guy--he's too normal!"

My German is not that great either. One witty thing in Tarrasch that might have mystified me no matter how big a vocabulary I had was his comment on a move refuting an opponent's idea: "that was the poodle's core!" What an expression!  I remembered it's what Faust says when he succeeds in forcing a supernatural being to emerge from its disguise as a poodle and a mere traveling scholar steps out--but it's really Mephistopheles. How to translate that?  (Looking it up, I see it is a perfectly ordinary expression that usually means "the heart of the matter," but here it's great writing because a devilish move has just appeared on the board.) Other things I never figured out.

@RoleyPoley--I know, so many great books out of print. Now if I just had time to read the ones I own cover-to-cover...but in my life I have rarely read anything cover-to-cover, chess or not. I just picked up a copy of Averbach's game collection. He seems like a modest, but erudite scientist. I'm looking forward to playing through his endgames, though he went out of his way to showcase his middlegame skills, too. Still looking for a copy of Gligoric.
« Last Edit: 07/27/20 at 15:16:12 by ReneDescartes »  
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Re: Game collectio
Reply #106 - 07/26/20 at 10:29:51
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ReneDescartes wrote on 07/26/20 at 02:41:44:
Gee, it's fun thinking of an answer to this. My list changes over time as I develop enthusiasms. Here are some current favorites.
  • Beim, Paul Morphy: A Modern Perspective
  • Tarrasch, his own 55 or so games from Die moderne Schachpartie (German only; written to be "like my 300 Games, but much more instructive," i.e. for a more general audience)
  • Donaldson and Minev, Akiva Rubinstein, Uncrowned King, Vol. 1
  • Golombek, Capablanca's Best Games,
  • Botvinnik's Best Games, Vol. 1-3 (annotations are similar to the descriptive-notation Dover 100 games, but reworded, occasionallly updated and cross-indexed with the other volumes, as in "I used x method, which we have already described in in game y").
  • Keres, The Road to the Top
  • Karpov, My Best Games (1978)--he wrote this one in the run-up to the Baguio City Korchnoi match. Not as dry as the later collections, written for a less expert audience.
.
Some collections I am currently disenchanted with: I find it hard to make myself read Alekhine's games since his annotations are so dishonest, though I know I should. Tal is a great writer, but I can't make myself root for his unsound play. Kasparov's annotations are extremely variation-heavy, and it's hard to forget that he's been personally rude to me just as he has to so many others.

Someone asked about Euwe. There is a biography by Münninghof, with game annotations by Euwe. It's well-written and entertaining, but I haven't gone through games from it yet.


It's a real shame some of these books are not re-released, and in the case of the Tarrasch book, published in english.
  

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Victor Bologan.
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Re: Game collections
Reply #105 - 07/26/20 at 10:27:55
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Stigma wrote on 07/25/20 at 19:35:00:
RoleyPoley wrote on 07/25/20 at 16:21:57:
I know very little about the Bogoljubov and he is probably someone i should make an effort to learn more about.


This must be some sort of honorific. Maybe shorthand for "the one and only Bogoljubov"?  Cheesy

It certainly fits with that very self-assured qoute he is famous for: "When I am White I win because I am White. When I am Black I win because I am Bogoljubov."

Wikipedia even tells me Bogoljubov means "beloved by God", which I never knew - it certainly adds new meaning to that quote. Probably that's what you were hinting at with "the".

Grin Grin

I think i accidentally left 'the' in as i was initially writing a sentence about only knowing the name from the Bogo-Indian and seeing the odd game of his mentioned here and there (where the focus is often on the play of his opponent).
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #104 - 07/26/20 at 05:53:43
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Thanks for pointing out the Euwe book. I haven't seen anything in English before. I did read Richter/Teschner (1964) Dr. Max Euwe: Auswahl Seiner Besten Partien, (the web says "Eine Auswahl ...", my edition did not) but I could not call it a "best" best games collection. My German is not good enough to judge that!

I hadn't heard of Alexander Münninghof. He apparently just passed away in April. On the New in Chess site the blurb calls the Euwe book a "gripping story", which must be a fib. But I will probably get it anyway, just to get Euwe's own annotations.
  
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Re: Game collectio
Reply #103 - 07/26/20 at 02:41:44
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Gee, it's fun thinking of an answer to this. My list changes over time as I develop enthusiasms. Here are some current favorites.
  • Beim, Paul Morphy: A Modern Perspective
  • Tarrasch, his own 55 or so games from Die moderne Schachpartie (German only; written to be "like my 300 Games, but much more instructive," i.e. for a more general audience)
  • Donaldson and Minev, Akiva Rubinstein, Uncrowned King, Vol. 1
  • Golombek, Capablanca's Best Games,
  • Botvinnik's Best Games, Vol. 1-3 (annotations are similar to the descriptive-notation Dover 100 games, but reworded, occasionallly updated and cross-indexed with the other volumes, as in "I used x method, which we have already described in in game y").
  • Keres, The Road to the Top
  • Karpov, My Best Games (1978)--he wrote this one in the run-up to the Baguio City Korchnoi match. Not as dry as the later collections, it'swritten for a less expert audience.
.
Some collections I am currently disenchanted with: I find it hard to make myself read Alekhine's games since his annotations are so dishonest, though I know I should. Tal is a great writer, but I can't make myself root for his unsound play. Kasparov's annotations are extremely variation-heavy, and it's hard to forget that he's been personally rude to me just as he has to so many others.

Someone asked about Euwe. There is a biography by Münninghof, with game annotations by Euwe. It's well-written and entertaining, but I haven't gone through games from it yet.
« Last Edit: 07/26/20 at 19:29:46 by ReneDescartes »  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #102 - 07/25/20 at 19:35:00
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RoleyPoley wrote on 07/25/20 at 16:21:57:
I know very little about the Bogoljubov and he is probably someone i should make an effort to learn more about.


This must be some sort of honorific. Maybe shorthand for "the one and only Bogoljubov"?  Cheesy

It certainly fits with that very self-assured qoute he is famous for: "When I am White I win because I am White. When I am Black I win because I am Bogoljubov."

Wikipedia even tells me Bogoljubov means "beloved by God", which I never knew - it certainly adds new meaning to that quote. Probably that's what you were hinting at with "the".
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #101 - 07/25/20 at 19:04:22
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Thanks Roley.  It looks nice and a good book on Bogoljubov is over due.  I think people perceive him unfairly as a “tomato can” whom Alekhine played to duck Capablanca.

I’m a big fan of games collections, but not sure if I will get this — at least not right away.  lately I’ve been trying to focus on more modern players.  I suppose that’s a question for another thread — which games collections to focus on?

  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #100 - 07/25/20 at 16:21:57
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Just thought i would bump this thread, as i've just had an email from NIC about the following book that is being released.

The Creative Power of Bogoljubov
Volume I: Pawn Play, Sacrifices, Restriction and More
by Grigory Bogdanovich

This looks like a really fascinating, and useful book to study. I know very little about the Bogoljubov and he is probably someone i should make an effort to learn more about.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #99 - 08/15/13 at 00:46:40
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I was wondering how Botvinnik's annotations in the cheap Dover book, "100 Selected Games" compare to the annotations in his 3-volume set. 

I recall Smyslov's notes to the 40 complete games in "Endgame Virtuoso" (previously unmentioned in this thread!) are identical to the notes for those particular games in his "My Best Games" anthology.  At least, that was my conclusion before I sold my copy of the original anthology (1957 edition iirc) to a collector.

I don't believe a game collection for Euwe has been mentioned.  I don't even know of one.

I'm not sure of the quality of "Why Lasker Matters" by Soltis, but i'm wondering whether it is worth tracking down & buying.

Besides Smyslov's "Endgame Virtuoso", others that either I missed above or were not mentioned:
Chess Praxis by Nimzowitsch
Art of Positional Play by Reshevsky
Magic of Tal by Gallagher
Nezhmetdinov's self-annotated book (or Super-Nezh by Pishkin)
The green book on Leonid Stein by Gufeld.
Mednis's book on Karpov; I believe the title is "How Karpov Wins".

James Plaskett wrote a self-annotated games collection well-disguised by the title, "Starting Out: Attacking Play".  It is obviously the least-serious book in this post, but it is reasonable for its target audience.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #98 - 06/12/11 at 14:52:41
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I glimpsed the other evening through beliavskys game collection and he states that any player wishing to improve on his game should seriously consider going over the patriarchs game collection.

this is a very common notion in the titled community.

botvinnik said that with all modesty those were the best books every written (hes talking about the 3 volume collection)

btw,
thank  you for the advices on geller and taimanov.

I have a request, does anyone have digital versions of the Larsen books? I cant seem to find good english ones, I want one commentated by him.

if you do hit me up, i would appreciate the gesture.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #97 - 06/12/11 at 14:46:16
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slates wrote on 06/26/08 at 20:13:23:
Thanks SmyslovFan, Willempie.  

Would anyone be kind enough to answer a couple of questions on the Dreev collection?  Namely, how many CKs are in it and are there any Slavs?  I know he specialised in the Semi Slav Meran, but I'm guessing there may be a number of regular Slavs too, or perhaps just Exchange Slavs?  Help much appreciated! (I'm playing CKs with 4...Bf5 rather than Karpov's preferred 4...Nd7 and so Dreev is higher on my 'wants' list at the moment, if that's a good enough reason to buy one book over the other.)

Cheers.


6 games atleast, at most 10. I saw the ECO codes.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #96 - 06/12/11 at 14:25:32
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castlerock wrote on 08/17/05 at 01:56:43:
Alekhine's game collection edited by Joh Nunn is good. He highlights all the bottlenecks of Alekhine's annotation. He highlighed one aspect which I concur. His annotations seem to say, "Hey, I won this game, which means opponent had no chance.

Another factor is he enumerates all the strategic ideas of the game in one move, giving an impression he thougth about all these in the move in question. Smiley


I think thats the best alekhine book in the market. its also maybe the only algebraic one out there. good insights and good choice.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #95 - 06/10/11 at 12:17:15
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People mentioned that books on Petrosian are hard to come by. One of my favourite chess books is Tigran Petrosian His Life and Games by Vik Vasiliev with game annotations by Suetin and Petrosian himself. It's in stock at Amazon.com when this is written.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #94 - 06/09/11 at 05:19:45
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The Second Piatigorsky Cup has also been published by Hardinge Simpole. Still just a reprint but it won't fall apart. http://www.hardingesimpole.co.uk/biblio/1843820633.htm
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #93 - 06/09/11 at 04:40:55
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Smyslov_Fan wrote on 08/15/05 at 21:31:21:
TN,


You're right, Lutikov's games would be interesting. (Just the games against Tal alone are fascinating)  How about a collection of Deep Fritz' best games, annotated by the great chip itself?   Wink  I am joking, but I know that it won't be long before someone at ChessBase comes up with the idea!

There was once an idea for a series of best games of anyone who broke 2700.  I think they published maybe two volumes before calling it quits.  I still would love to see such a series created.

BTW, the main reason I didn't include the Second Piatgorsky Cup among the great tournament books was the packaging.  It's little more than a pamphlet and will fall apart if I go through it one more time.  It is a classic because of the commentaries by the participants.


Second Piatigorsky Cup has been republished by Sam Sloan. So it should probably be a sturdier book now. It is a straight scan of a copy of the original most likely with a foreword added by Sloan, and then a cheap job of taking the pgn of the games and appending to the book. I try to ignore what Sloan adds to the books, and just be thankful that the titles have made it back into print in some form.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #92 - 06/08/11 at 14:43:35
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With good reason too, as 'Grandmaster Chess Strategy', which covers Ulf Andersson's games, is a great book.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #91 - 06/08/11 at 12:15:13
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Some great recommendations in this thread so I am bumping it!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #90 - 11/05/09 at 10:04:48
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Prince-Nez wrote on 08/14/05 at 18:25:25:
I wish Bent Larsen in his twilight years would write another one.  His only game collection came out in the 60's.  There was another book on his games by another player in the 80s (I can't recall who even though I have this book and it is signed by Larsen himself!)


Larsen fans might be interested in a new danish project on Larsen. The man himself is involved but I don't know if he will be the actual author. Anyway, it sounds like a monumental effort; at least two, probably three, volumes of 800 a4 pages each... The first volume is scheduled for October 2010.

The publisher is a small Danish company so it will probably only be available in that strange language.

In time you can find out more on the publisher's FB-page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Lofbergs-Forlag/140815396460 and perhaps convince them to make an English edition if you start nagging now! Wink
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #89 - 06/27/08 at 05:26:34
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LeeRoth wrote on 06/16/08 at 21:30:26:
The best games collections tend to be the autobiographical ones, but sometimes another author does a player justice.  My top ten:

1. Alekhine's My Best Games 
2. Fischer's 60 Memorable
3. Botvinnik's three volume set
4. Shirov's Fire on Board
5. Tal's Life and Games
6. Sanakoev's World Champion at the Third Attempt
7. Kasparov's Test of Time
8. Soltis's book on Marshall
9. Nunn's My Best Games
10. Taimanov's Selected Games



At last someone mentions a book of correspondence games and a really good one. I have most of the books mentioned on this thread.

I would add "64 Great Chesshames - Materpieces of Postal and Email Chess" by Tim Harding. This contains some awesome games including possibly the best chess game ever played Estrin v Berliner 5th World CC Final.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #88 - 06/27/08 at 01:58:29
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there are some good slav/semislav games in shirov's fire on board.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #87 - 06/26/08 at 20:13:23
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Thanks SmyslovFan, Willempie.  

Would anyone be kind enough to answer a couple of questions on the Dreev collection?  Namely, how many CKs are in it and are there any Slavs?  I know he specialised in the Semi Slav Meran, but I'm guessing there may be a number of regular Slavs too, or perhaps just Exchange Slavs?  Help much appreciated! (I'm playing CKs with 4...Bf5 rather than Karpov's preferred 4...Nd7 and so Dreev is higher on my 'wants' list at the moment, if that's a good enough reason to buy one book over the other.)

Cheers.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #86 - 06/26/08 at 08:00:42
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I have Meine Beste Partien by Karpov. 64 lightly but very much to the point annotated wins. I am not sure how many CK are in it, but there is a very nice win by him against Kamsky for the WC (also annotated in Nunn's move by move book).
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #85 - 06/26/08 at 07:48:35
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I too can vouch for Karpov's Best Games of Chess!  It's better than his Chess at the Top, which is far better than his horrible, How to Learn from Your Defeats.

Still, I prefer the quite old game collection, Tri matcha anatolia karpova, which has been translated into English, but I forget the title.  Kasparov obviously used this book a great deal in preparing for his section on Karpov in My Great Predecessors.  If you can find a copy, it might be fun to go through this one, trying to poke holes in the excellent analysis.  Fritz and the whole family could join in on the fun!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #84 - 06/26/08 at 06:40:16
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Paddy wrote on 06/26/08 at 01:09:36:
slates wrote on 06/25/08 at 18:44:11:
Just wondering if anyone here has read Karpov's My Best Games, the OLMS Progress in Chess edition?  I'm thinking about ordering this but can't find much info on it, i.e. I'd like to know how many Caro Kanns are in the book, for instance, as I have recently started playing the CK.  

In my copy of Volume 5 of Kasparov's My Great Predecessors, the Korchnoi/Karpov one,  I note that it only has two(!) CKs by Karpov.

Perhaps I should be buying Dreev's collection instead, at least for Caro Kanns, but any general comments on the Karpov book would be welcomed anyway.  Thanks


IMHO the Karpov is a good book: 295 large pages, good paper, 100 annotated games, but only eight Caro Kanns I'm afraid.

Kasparov's book "Revolution in the 70s Part 1" has 13 pages on the Caro, looking at the evolution of the 4...Bf5 line and the Advance.

You might wish to consider the now ageing but still useful book "The Caro Kann in Black and White", with fifty games, 25 annotated by Karpov and 25 by Beliavsky. I assume you have the Houska book, which is a good place to start looking at topical theory, plus there is useful material here at Chess Publishing  -  of course!  Wink

In addition to Dreev (sorry, not got his book to hand but I think there are quite a few Caro Kanns in it) strong contemporary Caro Kann specialists include Khenkin, Riazantsev, Burmakin, Zelcic and Yevseev. Also, as you probably know, Ivanchuk has played some instructive games on the black side recently.


Thanks Paddy, that's useful information. I can't find the 'Black and White' book, although I haven't scoured used sources yet, but do indeed have Houska, Wells and Karpov/Podgaets (on the Advance).  So plenty to be going on with, but I like games collections, too, and am surprised there aren't more CKs in Karpov's.

I didn't buy the Kasparov 'Revolution' book due to some of the reviews of it, not to mention the price.....you have to draw the line somewhere, even with chess books!  Still, maybe it would be worth a look if I can get it discounted.  Can you recall whether or not the Advance section mentions 3...c5 at all? I'm guessing it's unlikely, in the context of the time period it is talking about.

More likely, though, is that I'll opt for the Dreev book, as I am adopting the CaroSlav pawn structure in my repertoire and I imagine this may be the most suitable games collection out there specific to my interests in that sense.

I don't really keep up with current chess games as well as I should, but Ivanchuck playing the CK?! I'll have to look into that.  Always had him pegged as somewhat more adventurous, so it'll be interesting how he interprets it.  

Thanks Gabriel, too, for the info and link (interesting!).
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #83 - 06/26/08 at 01:46:03
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Not really on point but Karpov vs Kasparov Seville CK games annotated by David Bronstein (Kasparov - Karpov. Seville 1987) available here:
http://www.chesszone.org/lib/collected-games-books.html
There are two CK games, Games 10 and 14.
(But Seviile 1974 is full of Gruenfeld (10 games), English (5 games) and QGD (5 games).

In fact the site has an amazing collection of older chess books in English and Russian. (Am not too sure about copyrights etc, dowonload at own risk!). But there are also games collections of (Classical?) Chess Champions up to Kramnik (excluding Ponomariov, Khalifman etc).

The old karpov, My Best Games (1978 RHM Press) has two CK games, Spassky vs Karpov (Cand Leningrad 1974) and Karpov vs Zaitsev (USSR Ch semi-final Kuibyshev 1970).
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #82 - 06/26/08 at 01:09:36
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slates wrote on 06/25/08 at 18:44:11:
Just wondering if anyone here has read Karpov's My Best Games, the OLMS Progress in Chess edition?  I'm thinking about ordering this but can't find much info on it, i.e. I'd like to know how many Caro Kanns are in the book, for instance, as I have recently started playing the CK. 

In my copy of Volume 5 of Kasparov's My Great Predecessors, the Korchnoi/Karpov one,  I note that it only has two(!) CKs by Karpov.

Perhaps I should be buying Dreev's collection instead, at least for Caro Kanns, but any general comments on the Karpov book would be welcomed anyway.  Thanks


IMHO the Karpov is a good book: 295 large pages, good paper, 100 annotated games, but only eight Caro Kanns I'm afraid.

Kasparov's book "Revolution in the 70s Part 1" has 13 pages on the Caro, looking at the evolution of the 4...Bf5 line and the Advance.

You might wish to consider the now ageing but still useful book "The Caro Kann in Black and White", with fifty games, 25 annotated by Karpov and 25 by Beliavsky. I assume you have the Houska book, which is a good place to start looking at topical theory, plus there is useful material here at Chess Publishing  -  of course!  Wink

In addition to Dreev (sorry, not got his book to hand but I think there are quite a few Caro Kanns in it) strong contemporary Caro Kann specialists include Khenkin, Riazantsev, Burmakin, Zelcic and Yevseev. Also, as you probably know, Ivanchuk has played some instructive games on the black side recently.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #81 - 06/25/08 at 18:44:11
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Just wondering if anyone here has read Karpov's My Best Games, the OLMS Progress in Chess edition?  I'm thinking about ordering this but can't find much info on it, i.e. I'd like to know how many Caro Kanns are in the book, for instance, as I have recently started playing the CK.  

In my copy of Volume 5 of Kasparov's My Great Predecessors, the Korchnoi/Karpov one,  I note that it only has two(!) CKs by Karpov.

Perhaps I should be buying Dreev's collection instead, at least for Caro Kanns, but any general comments on the Karpov book would be welcomed anyway.  Thanks
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #80 - 06/21/08 at 07:52:16
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For english speaking readers I think MY 60 MG leads as the book is written in natural idiomatic English, some of the Russian classics just surely lose something in translation e.g. I often see someting like "White smokes out Black's bishop" and I am not 100% sure what that means and I think it was clearer in the original Russian.
I think Larsen's English is very good and that makes his Selected Games a very good read.
I would also mention Larsen's Good Move Guide and His book on the 78 Karpov v Korchnoi match.

I also like those game colectins with a clear historical narrative with not too many games . Timman Art of Chess Analysis
springs to mind.
On the other hand sometimes these quirky Russian Idioms are part of the apppeal.

  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #79 - 06/16/08 at 21:30:26
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The best games collections tend to be the autobiographical ones, but sometimes another author does a player justice.  My top ten:

1. Alekhine's My Best Games 
2. Fischer's 60 Memorable
3. Botvinnik's three volume set
4. Shirov's Fire on Board
5. Tal's Life and Games
6. Sanakoev's World Champion at the Third Attempt
7. Kasparov's Test of Time
8. Soltis's book on Marshall
9. Nunn's My Best Games
10. Taimanov's Selected Games

  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #78 - 06/16/08 at 21:12:09
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Stigma wrote on 06/16/08 at 14:28:53:
@Paddy
Actually, of Tal's books I have only read/browsed "Life and Games" and "Attack with Mikhail Tal", but I thought in the spirit of objectivity and realism a book with both wins and losses should be preferred.

I didn't specify which translation I would read either, but admittedly an english one looks most likely. Wink


Cheers Stigma.  Wink

I'd also add Geller's collection to my second category; a very important player in the development of modern chess.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #77 - 06/16/08 at 14:28:53
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@Paddy
Actually, of Tal's books I have only read/browsed "Life and Games" and "Attack with Mikhail Tal", but I thought in the spirit of objectivity and realism a book with both wins and losses should be preferred.

I didn't specify which translation I would read either, but admittedly an english one looks most likely. Wink
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #76 - 06/16/08 at 13:55:24
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FischerTal wrote on 06/15/08 at 21:51:34:
great answer Stigma, Tal v Bot 1960 definitely has that fresh feel to it.
and the others you mention

Piatgorsky cup 1966 is good with notes from both players (apart from BF)

an interesting one is mednis how to beat a stronger player where he annotates every game lost by a soviet gm inthe mid 70s - you see how real gm games are won and lost rather than just the highlights


Funny how we keep going round in circles in many of our book threads here.  I can understand why English edition of Tal-Botvinnik 1960 is on many people's lists but not why it is so high up, since it reads so weird in places and contains outright errors, as I pointed out in  another thread:

Paddy wrote on 03/28/08 at 10:44:06:
I have now had the opportunity to spend some time looking at the “revised and expanded” 5th edition of Tal-Botvinnik 1960, “edited” by Taylor Kingston.

Compared with the fourth edition, some errors have been corrected, such as incorrectly spelt names (e.g. Liliental-Lilienthal, Flor Flohr, Porreka-Porreca, Lipitsky-Lipnitsky, Fogelman-Foguelman), but not all (e.g. Gligorich, which is phonetically accurate but normally spelt without the h).

There are still some small “technical” errors which one would have expected to have been weeded out by the 5th edition, e.g. page 61, note to Black’s 9th move, 9…Qb6: “Black immediately begins to take action against the d5 square.” Of course, this should be d4, not d5.

There are also still some obscure or meaningless sentences, e.g. page 18: “Capablanca’s “lighter” system and other orthodox defenses seem to have been forgotten in the archives of history.” Did you understand that? My guess is that the reference is to Capablanca’s once famous “simplifying manoeuvre” (…dxc4, …Nd5) in the orthodox Queen’s Gambit.

I checked the relevant pages against the list of errors pointed out by Dr Neat in New in Chess magazine 1997/7 and found that most of them have still not been corrected.

I should be less concerned if all the errors in the book were small and did not spoil the sense. But how about these:

On page 19 there is a serious error: referring to the Modern Benoni, Russell’s version reads:

“Aron Nimzowitsch was the first to use it in a game with Frank Marshall in the New York International Tournament of 1927. Marshall immediately transferred his knight to c4, and the instant Black hesitated (…) he was smothered in a few moves.” In fact, in the game referred to here, Nimzowitsch was White and Marshall Black! This is a famous game, and reversing the names of the players is arguably evidence of a deficiency in chess culture as well as in Russian grammar.

On page 58; “There is a curious story behind the King’s Indian Defence. It got recognition 20 years ago. Before that it was rarely, or as they say, spontaneously employed. In particular, Chigorin would never have selected such a system.” The last sentence should read something like: “In particular, such a set-up was chosen long ago by Chigorin.”

On page 59: (Discussing the history of the g3 system against the King’s Indian): “Black’s difficulties in this variation arose when he started searching for more active continuations…” This should read rather: ““Black’s difficulties in this variation prompted him to start searching for more active continuations…”

On page 59: Discussing the Petrosian system against the King’s Indian (usually reached by 1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 Bg7 4 e4 d6 5 Nf3 0-0 6 Be2 e5 7 d5) “The talented Ukrainian master Leonid Stein has had the last word for Black in this variation in which he played h6 in answer to Bg5 and nipped White’s idea in the bud, of course at the cost of a tempo.” It should be obvious that “In answer to Bg5” is an incorrect translation; it should say “before Bg5” or “to prevent Bg5”. (Remember, these are just examples, and this is supposed to be the 5th revised edition!)

There is no doubt that, even with the errors and ambiguities, there is much to enjoy and learn from this book, but it could have been so, so, much better.


To be fair, I should add that the chess world should also be very grateful to Hanon Russell for the huge amount of high-quality (and free!) content at the Chess Café website, and for the many really excellent books that his company has published in recent years - but unfortunately, even in its "5th edition",  "Tal-Botvinnik 1960" isn't one of them. [/quote]

My own favourite self-annotated game collections:
Tartakower
Bronstein
Keres
Larsen

Collections I admire greatly and appreciate for their instructional value but don't love to the same extent as the above: Botvinnik, Smyslov, Boleslavsky.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #75 - 06/16/08 at 13:44:16
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Smyslov_Fan wrote on 06/16/08 at 08:02:16:
Yermolinsky made quite a few references to what his opponents didn't see which makes his own disclosures feel much less authentic.


Why less authentic? In a hard-fought game usually both players make mistakes. We couldn't really expect Yermo to choose only games where his opponents played their very best chess, and frankly that would paint a much less realistic picture of actual tournament practice for a US-based GM. "Learn from your mistakes" certainly, but also "Shave on someone else's face"!

Maybe I didn't understand your comment...
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #74 - 06/16/08 at 08:02:16
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Stigma stole my thunder.

Great choice in selecting Tal's games.

Another, more recent selection is a protegee of Tal:  Alexei Shirov.  Kramnik's My Life and Games (note the similar title to Tal's autobiography) is also pretty candid about what he saw and didn't see.

Yermolinsky made quite a few references to what his opponents didn't see which makes his own disclosures feel much less authentic.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #73 - 06/16/08 at 07:42:11
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Hello,

The book of the First Piatigorsky Cup has the same format as second. There are lots of cheap Dover editions available for the Second Cup. Even the orginal HB's for both aren't that more expensive than Harding Simpole edition.
              I browsed the Suttles books recently. The production values are not very high, if care about such things, and the annotations don't look that great either.

Bye John S
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #72 - 06/15/08 at 22:38:35
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I just googled the "Second Piatigorsky Cup" book and found that Harding Simpole has re-released it (2004)! I will have to buy it eventually, the format sounds so interesting with comments from both players to compare. Has anyone else used this format, before or since?

Didn't know about that Mednis book, sounds interesting! A bit like "How to Beat Bobby Fischer" maybe?
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #71 - 06/15/08 at 21:51:34
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great answer Stigma, Tal v Bot 1960 definitely has that fresh feel to it.
and the others you mention

Piatgorsky cup 1966 is good with notes from both players (apart from BF)

an interesting one is mednis how to beat a stronger player where he annotates every game lost by a soviet gm inthe mid 70s - you see how real gm games are won and lost rather than just the highlights
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #70 - 06/15/08 at 20:54:26
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FischerTal wrote on 06/15/08 at 17:04:45:
I wonder - what player in their annotations gives you the best idea of how much they saw at the time they were playing the game.


An obvious suggestion is Mikhail Tal, who has been qouted to the effect that analysis within minutes at the board is not at all the same as days and months without time pressure. He was certainly a believer in setting the opponent great psychological and practical problems, and not afraid to admit that sometimes his sacrifices where not objectively correct. Rowson (quoting Utterburg I think) described Tal's psychological style as depriving the opponent of "responsibility" for the game by playing shocking moves and going down paths they had not foreseen.

"Later, ... I began to succeed in decisive games. Perhaps because I realised a very simple truth: not only was I worried, but also my opponent."
- Mikhail Tal

If your main concern is objectivity you should probably start with "Tal-Botvinnik 1960" which contains both wins, draws and losses from that epic match.

Also, some weaker GMs writing on the theme of chess improvement willingly use their own games, both good and not-so-good ones. Yermolinsky's "Road to Chess Improvement" is a prime example, as are Rowson's two books, though he also uses other players' games a lot.

Dvoretsky's books (alone or with Yusupov) are also full of good and bad decisions by himself or his students.

That's 5 names already, so I'm going to stop now!
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #69 - 06/15/08 at 17:04:45
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I wonder - what player in their annotations gives you the best idea of how much they saw at the time they were playing the game.

Fischer gives some good things there like he reveals how he missed a defensive trick of Geller's till really late in the game (The Vleimirovic attack game )Also BF puts afew losses and draws in that Is good I think - Capablanca also put in his losses in Chess Fundamentals.

I am intersted to know just how much the players saw (and missed Tongue~) during the game
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #68 - 06/15/08 at 15:11:35
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FischerTal wrote on 06/15/08 at 13:32:40:
I just wish Kasparov would write a book of his best games - he has annotated some for NIC or CHessbase , I remember one excellent annotaation of a game in Panov Attack vs Annand which was possibly the best annotated game I ever saw .

What, you don't know that after Revolution in the 70s hes gonna wrote a book about all his games against Karpov, computers and a collection of his best games? These are probably the most eagerly awaited chess books around! Cool
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #67 - 06/15/08 at 13:32:40
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Back when I was 1650 or so I used to really like Marshall's collected games - hisopponents used to make the same opening mistakes mine did.

Fischers 60 memorable of course-if only for some of the comments though the games in How to beat Bobby Fischer are interesting and well annotated.

Bent Larsen is good writere and Larsen's Selected games are well and revealingly nnotated.

Tal Life and Games is the perfect book for when youv'e blundered on the 40th move and feel like giving u Chess.

Botvinnik's 3 volume set are written very instructively.
or get Botty's 100 seleted games for less money.

I just wish Kasparov would write a book of his best games - he has annotated some for NIC or CHessbase , I remember one excellent annotaation of a game in Panov Attack vs Annand which was possibly the bestannotated game I ever saw .

Finally one of the books which really got me interested in chess was Chernev's 62 Most Instructive games of chess - I can see lots of techncal flaws now but his enthusiasm shone through the book.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #66 - 06/14/08 at 14:57:11
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HgMan wrote on 08/15/05 at 20:21:29:
I'd love to see a collection of Duncan Suttles's games.


It's been some time in the making, but this three-volume set looks terrific.  I've put in an order and will report back, but I thought a number of Chesspub forum members might like to know that a very substantial collection of Duncan Suttles's games has been put together by NM Bruce Harper with Yasser Seirawan's help.  Check the link:

http://www.suttlesbook.com/


  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #65 - 11/02/05 at 08:50:45
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Longspur,

I forgot about How to Defend in Chess by Crouch.  You're right, that does have a good section on Petrosian's games.

The book by Peter Clarke is the one I referred to in an earlier post.  It's been reissued in algebraic under some hokey title like Petrosian the Powerful

But you and cjb are both right in pointing out there just aren't many game collections to choose from.  I have always thought it was because Petrosian's games are thought to be too difficult for the average buyer to bother with.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #64 - 11/02/05 at 07:14:10
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Hello,

In a similar vein to "How to Defend in chess", i.e not really a games collection, but contains great analysis of Petrosian's games, is Marin's Learn from the Legends.
This one would be a good contender for the best chess book of recent times, and Marin is by favourite chess author at the moment.
             Bye John S
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #63 - 11/02/05 at 04:24:57
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"Jeez.......I don't think I saw one person mention Petrosian! " -- cbj

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay.  No one ever mentions Peter Clarke's "Petrosian's Best Games of Chess -- 1946 -- 1963."  What ever else you may want to say about this book, there are 60 Petrosian games -- and you can buy the darn thing for a reasonable price.   (Of course, it is in Descriptive Notation, and if that bothers you -- beware!)

I would love it is you could reach up on the bookshelves and pull down Petrosian like you can Alekhine, Capablanca, Botvinnik.

Here is a book I really like and have enjoyed, with a plumb awful (as in maybe misleading) title:

"How to Defend in Chess," by Colin Crouch.

The first part of the book are games by Lasker, and the second part games by Petrosian.  There are also supplemental games.  There are just a whole bunch of fun games to play over in this book, and, along the way you get the idea that Lasker and Petrosian started to begin to commence to differ in the way they approached the game.  The book is NOT about "how to defend,"  but does have a bunch'a good stuff about how Lasker and Petrosian defended.

Just a great games collection.

  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #62 - 11/02/05 at 01:01:43
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cjb,

See if your local library carries The Games of Tigran Petrosian, volumes I and II by Shekhtman.  It includes every known game of his, commentaries both by him and others, modern game references, and biographical articles.  If those two books don't sate your appetite for Petrosian, I don't know what will. 

I'm not sure, but I thought there was a game collection in the same series that had collections of Tal and Spassky.  The titles were utterly forgettable, but were something like "Tal the Terriffic" and "Spassky the Great" or something equally lame  I think it was "Petrosian the Powerful" and contained 100 of his games.

Another great source, that does justice to Petrosian, is Kasparov's My Great Predecessors Volume 3.  I hope this helps.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #61 - 11/01/05 at 17:07:20
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You are spot on as far as Petrosians Legacy. Still it is very interesting. While it is not a game collection in the classic since it is the closest I have for him! It is interesting to note that Petrosian did not annotate many of his own games. I guess he left that to others. The reason I had to list Gligoric is he played many of the same openings I do now. SO, as far as opening study is concerned I have to list it since I was able to get a lot out of the book.

As far as Petrosian is concerened I'M very surprised no one has come out with an updated game collection of this former world champion. As far as learning positional fundementals Petrosian games are by far the most instructional!!!!!!! Karpov is a close second though....................
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #60 - 11/01/05 at 14:36:11
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cjb,

Take a look at the #5 post in this thread for mention of Petrosian.  His game collections are either very expensive (as the two volumes I mentioned) or almost impossible to find.

Petrosian's Legacy is a very interesting, curious book, but not a game collection.  It's a collection of articles that were written by him, and it deals with numerous chess issues.  I would certainly recommend it to anyone who's looking for some interesting ideas, but perhaps one should check it out of the library first.

I enjoyed most of the books you mentioned, but I really disliked Gligoric' I Play Against the Pieces.  The annotations didn't seem to add much to the games.  Perhaps it was the translation to English, but the book made me dislike Gligoric' personality.  I may be alone in this though.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #59 - 10/31/05 at 18:52:12
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Jeez.......I don't think I saw one person mention Petrosian! Though his game collections are hard to find they are well worth the study for anyone wishing to beef up their positional approach to the game! The folowing are a lsit of my favorite game collections in no particular order since I love them all equally:

Petrosian's Legacy
Mikail Tal :Life & Games
Paul Keres: Road to the Top
My Best games ala Karpov
My Best Games of Chess ala Alekhine
Nimzovitch: A Reapprasil
100 Selected Games ala Botvinik
Tal/Botvinik 1960
I Play the Pieces ala Gligoric
How Karpov Wins (very underated book...fantastic!)
The games of Harry Nelson Pillsbury

Currently I'M trying to score a collection of Bent Larson games.......
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #58 - 10/31/05 at 04:44:24
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One of the best game collections I think for rank and file players is Tarrasch' 300 Schachpartien. I wouldnt recommend going through all 300, but the games are quite well annotated and illustrate concepts which are very important once you are beyond beginner's level.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #57 - 10/30/05 at 21:38:29
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In no particular order here are some of my personal favorite player game collection books :

1.Fighting Chess, Kasparov... what else can be said?
2.My best Games of Chess Anatoly Karpov  his explanations are as simple and smooth as his chess was.
3.My Games and Life by Kramnik.  I love the depths of Kramnik's strategic understanding and tactical powers in chess and I love this book because it opened my eyes to it even more and learned more about how Kramnik rose in the chess world.
4.Profile of a Chess Prodigy--Fischer...  of course.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #56 - 10/29/05 at 05:25:54
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"Chess understanding isn't linear, and the development of chess theory through history is not the only, nor even the most efficient way to learn chess. " -- Smyslov_Fan

--------------------------------------------------------------------

I am NOT arguing with this (besides, even if I were with my rating that might be like a house painter arguing about the way Picasso spread paint around), but a couple of thoughts did come to mind.

Jack Collins, who liked to work with kids and at once mentored at the same time Fischer, Lombary and the Byrne brothers, had an extensive chess library his kids plowed into.  In a book I read maybe a quarter of a century ago, "My Seven Chess Prodigies,"  he said he had them play through the collected games of all the world champions in chronological order.

Also it used to be recommended studying the ABC's of chess, being, of course, Alekhine, Botvinnik and Capablanca.  Not a bad program.

I guess a more modern take would be to study the K's.

But, regardless of efficiency, I'm guessing most people "study" chess like a person with an empty plate at a big all-you-can-eat buffet or salad bar.  You know, a little of this, a bit of that, and, as the old saying has it, "eyes bigger than your stomach."  You could call this the "pig out" study method.  Probably not best for chess health or nutrition, but so tempting.


  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #55 - 10/29/05 at 01:05:59
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Castlerock,

You refer to one of the McDonnell-LaBourdanais games as an excellent educational device, and you are indeed correct.

However, if you have ever played through all the match-games between these players (which I once did), you will see a few really cool ideas (in the QGA and Sicilian for example), but also many missed opportunities.

What really struck me in that match is that McDonnell really believed strongly that Knights were quite a bit better than Bishops and both players would avoid allowing the other player to trade off the B for N making for some very strange opening choices.

Such strange preferences and miscalculations of the relative worth of pieces did indeed create a few interesting positions, but the chess world really did need a Steinitz or some other superbly strong player to show at least a basic understanding of the relative value of the pieces.

I once agreed with Euwe's theory that individual chess development mirrors historical chess development, but no more.  I now believe that understanding dynamic chess is more akin to understanding calculus than some linear progression through ideas. 

The developing mind is just not capable of grasping certain ideas except for a few prodigies who seem to understand the intricacies and consequences of the most esoteric theories better than professionals.

Chess understanding isn't linear, and the development of chess theory through history is not the only, nor even the most efficient way to learn chess.

  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #54 - 10/29/05 at 00:50:50
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@Smyslov_Fan,

I agree with you. They don’t stand modern strategy. But a chess player’s progression moves very much the same way chess progressed from Morphy to Kasparov. Level of sophistication kept increasing in the past hundred and fifty years. It’s the way a chess player evolves. So, it is a very important tool for Coaches, imho..

There’s another reason. Lets say the person studying the game (or being taught)is around 1600-1800, what is it he is going to learn from perfect (should I say nauseatingly perfect?) theoretical discussion between say Lautier and Vaganian ?. (I have consciously avoided top ten example). But these classics have a lot to teach.

For example nothing teaches the power of central pawn majority in middle game better than McDonnel  - La Bordonnais
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #53 - 10/28/05 at 16:00:08
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True, though especially Anderssen has played a couple of games, which survive scrutiny. See eg
Anderssen-Staunton, London 1851 (3.3).
Rosanes-Anderssen, Breslau 1863.

Another neglected game is Morphy-Anderssen, Paris (1).
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
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Re: Game collections
Reply #52 - 10/28/05 at 15:11:02
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Woofwoof, your query about Blackburne, Zuckertort and Anderssen shows that you are at least familiar with some of the strong players of the past.  However, if you have chessbase, you will quickly realise that all but their very best games just don't stand up to modern scrutiny.  There are strategic, positional and tactical blunders galore in their games (committed by both their opponents and themselves).
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #51 - 10/28/05 at 11:50:28
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How about Blackburne, Zukertort, Andersson & Marshall?
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #50 - 10/28/05 at 06:51:28
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You forgot my favourite and also Nimzovitsj and Euwe.


Your hero is present, with a wrong spelling. Wink

But the guy I'm getting to acquaint deeply, these days is missing - Gligoric.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #49 - 10/27/05 at 21:26:48
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You forgot my favourite and also Nimzovitsj and Euwe.
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
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Re: Game collections
Reply #48 - 10/27/05 at 07:55:58
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I was thinking about the focus on player game collections and thought some good ones depending on your style might be collection of:

Keres
Fischer
Botvinik
Tal
Capablanca
Shirov
Kasparov
Karpov
Bronstein
Steinitz
Alekhine
Speelman
Pillsbury
Tchigorin
Morphy
Smyslov
The list goes on im sure i jsut cant think of any more at the moment. But these are all available. And are probley worth their weight in gold.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #47 - 10/26/05 at 07:51:25
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Hello,

Both Nunn's books on his games are very good, nice blend of analysis and general explanation.  The earlier one was written jointly with someone, and there was more of a deliberate attempt of teaching principles.  Later one more of a straight analysis of games. Think he has another one coming out soon, from Gambit?
         When browsed Flear's book, it was a fairly superficial look at games of the top players, from 1994 or so.

Bye John S
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #46 - 10/26/05 at 01:10:36
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I have Grandmaster Chess by Flear, and it just gathers dust.  Nunn's Secrets of Grandmaster Play is a much better buy.  I don't reall know why there's such a difference in the quality of analysis, but there you have it.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #45 - 10/25/05 at 23:17:12
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Any one has Grand Master Chess by John Nunn? I think this book traces his progress from very young age. I would like to know your views
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #44 - 10/25/05 at 21:29:04
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I know Keene's annotations of Nimzovitsj-Spielmann, Carlsbad 1929 and they are excellent, indeed even better than Nimzo's own annotations.
If this is the average level, Keene's book on Nimzovitsj might be the best book he has ever written - it dates from 1974.
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
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Re: Game collections
Reply #43 - 10/23/05 at 07:07:40
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I'll have to take a look at Raymond Keene's book on Nimzovich.  Once upon a time, he did write relatively well.  Then he learned that he could crank out absolute rubbish and still have people buy his books.  Such a shame.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #42 - 10/22/05 at 11:24:38
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I know Raymond Keene doesn't have much of a reputation as a writer, but his Aron Nimzovich: A Reappraisal is an exception in my opinion.  It is easier to pick up Nimzovich's ideas than from Chess Praxis.  Edward Winter questions some of the historical information in the book, but for most this is a small quibble.  I also think Tarrasch's game collection is an alltime great.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #41 - 10/21/05 at 23:33:11
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I like Dynamic Chess Strategy by Suba too, but I don't keep going back to it the way I do for most of the game collections already mentioned.  So I have to go with the game collections over Suba's excellent and thoughtful challenge to orthodoxy.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #40 - 10/21/05 at 09:28:23
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Not really a game collection (although...), but the best chess book ever (imho) is Dynamic Chess Strategy by Suba....
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #39 - 10/21/05 at 06:24:57
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Just 'cause no one has mentioned it yet:

"The Sorcerer's Apprentice," by David Bronstein and Tom Furstenberg, Everyman Chess.  Has 222 games played between 1938 and 1995 -- 57 years!

Should note that the authors say the book was written primarily for amateurs.  The games are a delight.

Two Dover books (Dover has nice books that are not very expensive):

"The Immortal Games of Capablanca," by Fred Reinfeld,

and

"How Karpov Wins," by Edmar Mednis.

Note:  Both these Dover books are in Descriptive notation.

  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #38 - 10/21/05 at 05:30:53
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Hello Symslov_Fan,

I have the two books you mention. The Taimanov one is particularly good for looking at NimzoIndian games. I used to really like the Geller book, but went off it because the analysis/comments struck me as a bit dishonest, if you compare same game(s) with Fischer's book for example.
     The Botvinnik/Symslov series are from Moravian chess. The books are quite expensive, maybe $35 each, but contain every game, from previous books by these players, the old Dover ones for example, plus extras. (For example, you can see the semko game, you were talking about in another thread). They are translations of russian books from the 80's. The symslov one is here 
http://moravian-chess.cz/katalog.php?idkat=24 if interested, not sure how easy to get in the US.

@woofwoof  I tend to agree with you, but some people are not impressed with the quality of analysis in these books. The comments/analysis are not all from Petrosian but were collected from old Soviet sources. Match books of Spassky v Petrosian for example.

Bye John S
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #37 - 10/20/05 at 20:02:49
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Quote:
  This one gives un-updated analysis, which probably has big holes if Fritz where let loose on it, but gives a nice feel for the times.


In modern times where computers are such a big part the lives of chess players (GM's & patzers alike) it is quite normal that all game collections today will be subjected to the engine by the author himself before going to print. But if we are talking about the old books which came abt when computers never existed & every player studied from books.... the original analysis should be left alone if they are going into reprint. Especially so for personal game collections. The original analysis represent the author's thought process during the game so there is a certain feeling & emotion being conveyed to the readers. But if those are improved upon by the silicone monster, that feeling & match atmosphere isnt conveyed anymore, but a cold book of analysis. That is why i prefer the chess books of old & not the modern day ones (even if there are some mistakes here & there) But hey! lets face it....For most of us patzers anyway, we wouldnt be able to tell the difference if a mistake had been made unless it was a glaringly obvious blunder right?

As I've mentioned in another thread....improving upon analysis & attributing it to the original author is also very disrespectful to the author.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #36 - 10/20/05 at 17:10:16
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John,

I think the series of game collections you're talking about are by Cadogan Press.  They include two excellent game collections that I use and would recommend to anyone striving to become a serious tournament player:

Taimanov's Selected Games &
The Application of Chess Theory by Yefim Geller

There's another, that I don't have called Grandmaster Preparation (I think) by Lev Polugaevsky that many rave about. 

Nevertheless, Taimanov's book is truly a fantastic educational tool.  Geller's writing is a bit more convoluted, but then so is his chess style.  He also has a bigger ego than Taimanov, which shows up in his organization of the book into openings, and then games in which he beat (or drew in the case of Tal) world champions.

Still, the notes and stories in both books make them extraordinary.  I rank them among my most favorite chess books!  I hope you can check these out.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #35 - 10/20/05 at 10:43:09
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alumbrado has made me quite happy cos I found a nice hardback version of Speelman's book, after looking for sometime. By personal favs are Botvinniks's three volumne set, nice explanations with less known training games too, and the two volumne Petrosian game collection. This one gives un-updated analysis, which probably has big holes if Fritz where let loose on it, but gives a nice feel for the times.
                    Currently looking through one of the Smyslov set, from same house as the Botvinnik one above. Like Karpov, tends to analysis like defeat is inevitable for his opponent, but really like his games at the moment. Of the many Karpov collections like "chess at the top" best. Kasparov's books on two matches against Karpov are great, but the analysis spiralls out of control in some games.
                 I found Timman's book on Curacao 1962 very disappointing. He seems much more interested in the politics of the event, than looking at the games.

Bye John S
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #34 - 10/20/05 at 09:39:37
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The first game collection i read as a junior was Anatoly Karpov's Best Games on Batsford (the one with the VERY SCARY VAMPIRIC RED FACE  Shocked )

It isn't especially good, but the games made a huge impression on me at the time.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #33 - 10/19/05 at 10:15:55
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The collections i own of players is only 3. Life and Games of Mikhail Tal being my favorite for a lot fo reasons. Tal was one of the best chess writers even by todays standars. The games are fun to go over and the stories are jsut as fun to read. I will often read just the stuff before or after a game just to learn more about his history and skip over the games to a later point.

I have Botviniks 100 selected games which i pretty good. A lot of the openings he employs in it i wouldnt go near but its good for improiving your chess and i actually purchased it for only 8$ US. This was awesome to me as i think it is worth much more than that.

Then i have Sid Packards: The collected games of Willhelm Steinitz. Steinitz was my first inspiration in chess. And his game collection even thoush short on the annotations is extremely rewarding. Some 200 and somthing games are annotated by the man himself.

I also have a copy of the modern chess instructor which is of couurse a very old opening reference by the first world champion but it is a very interesting book in a historical perspective.

But tournament collections are probley my favorite. I have Zurich 53 and AVRO which was a very very strong tournament. If they put out a book on the latest fide tournement i would be sure to buy that as well. The chess played there was not bland by any means. Topalov did an amazing job and i have to give  shout out to Morozevich who is a personal hero of mine as his play is highly original he didnt continue his hot streak but he played well beating and drawing the strongest players there. Leko,Anand,Topalov. Thats impressive.

A collection i want to get though is Alekhines games. He was one of the most agressive players of all time. In many ways he was the precursor to Tal, and Kasparov.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #32 - 08/18/05 at 03:48:28
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If you can get hold of a copy of Jon Speelman's Best Chess Games 1970-1980 for less than the £60 ($110/€90) it is currently being advertised for at amazon.co.uk, I would go with that as the finest annotated collection of games I have ever seen (it is other people's games rather than his own, although I think he sneaks one of hs own in at some point!).

Hübner's 25 Selected Games contains the most incredible in-depth annotations (of his own games) and is a thing of beauty in terms of the production as well (unlike the Speelman book, my copy of which has disintegrated  Sad ).  It may 'only' be 25 games but the annotations will keep you going for - literally - months, if not years.
  

If sometimes we fly too close to the sun, at least this shows we are spreading our wings.
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Re: Game collections
Reply #31 - 08/17/05 at 20:57:22
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Prince-Nez,

May your nose hairs grow ever longer!

Thanks, that's a great website.  The book runs only $24.95 for a hardback if they actually have any copies left!


Thanks, but they are long enough already.  Grin

I am guessing he does because he also has a copy up at ebay right now.  However, it is for a "buy it now" price that is even higher.  

Labate was supposed to get all of Chess Digest's old inventory.  However, I think the deal fell through before completion.  He does have a good bit of it though.  A lot of old but still brand new books.  Most of them are crappy opening pamphlets but there is a good bit of quality too.

I am happy to have been of service to you.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #30 - 08/17/05 at 20:35:01
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Prince-Nez,

May your nose hairs grow ever longer!

Thanks, that's a great website.  The book runs only $24.95 for a hardback if they actually have any copies left!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #29 - 08/17/05 at 19:48:34
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Re: Game collections
Reply #28 - 08/17/05 at 19:23:56
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Tops,

Tal-Botvinnik 1960 by Tal certainly ranks as one of the best chess books ever published.  But 500 Master Games of Chess by Tartakover has really aged badly.  While there are some really great games in that book, many of them are so full of tactical holes they wouldn't even make a good club magazine anymore.  And while Tartakover certainly created some state-of-the-art analysis for his day, it's greatest value for me has been to give to class D and E students to rip apart!  (I know, dissing a great book is impolite.  My mum's still mad at me for not sending birthday greetings to my younger sister in time.  She just turned 37.  Oops, another faux pas. Embarrassed )
Quote:
Wijk aan Zee Grandmaster Chess Tournament 1975 This one is also quite good, with annotations by Kavalek, Browne, Geller, Gligoric, Hort, Hubner, Langeweg, Portisch, Smejkal, Sosonko, Timman.


Now this is a book that sounds fantastic!  If you know of a way to get it here in the US, cue me in!

I'm always on the look out for great books!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #27 - 08/17/05 at 18:30:36
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Here are three more excellent game collections.

Tal vs Botvinnik World Championship 1960. This is a masterpiece, and the analysis and commentary is done by Tal himself.

Wijk aan Zee Grandmaster Chess Tournament 1975 This one is also quite good, with annotations by Kavalek, Browne, Geller, Gligoric, Hort, Hubner, Langeweg, Portisch, Smejkal, Sosonko, Timman.

500 Master Games of Chess by Dr. S. Tartakower and J. Du Mont. A very nice collection of annotated games sorted into Open Games, Semi Open Games and Closed Games. You will find some entertaining oldie goldies and perhaps some old wine you can put in a new bottle as well.

Toppylov Grin
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #26 - 08/17/05 at 03:58:18
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Nobody has menstioned that lovely little book, Learn from your mistakes by Karpov. It's a good book.


What's good about that one?? What I recall of it, there's a very quick look at Karpov's loss and then lots of comments on the next game he won against the same opponent.

Typical for Karpov's annotations were that when he lost, his opponent played some bad moves, while when Karpov wins his opponents play perfectly...

Tartakower's My Best Games of Chess 1905-1954 should be a given. The dude played almost every opening there is and quite well too!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #25 - 08/17/05 at 01:56:43
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Alekhine's game collection edited by Joh Nunn is good. He highlights all the bottlenecks of Alekhine's annotation. He highlighed one aspect which I concur. His annotations seem to say, "Hey, I won this game, which means opponent had no chance.

Another factor is he enumerates all the strategic ideas of the game in one move, giving an impression he thougth about all these in the move in question. Smiley
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #24 - 08/16/05 at 17:18:02
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He certainly does.  His annotations are quite snotty toward Capablanca, for instance. 


Well...... cant blame him in a way. Those 2 are sworn enemies both on & off the board. Tongue Just that its SAD that he has to reflect his resentment in his annotations as well. Very immature & unbecoming of any person esp a world champ.  Angry
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #23 - 08/15/05 at 22:43:10
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I fully agree with TopNotch, that Lutikov and Juchtman (how do Americans pronounce Yukhtman ?) deserve a game collection. The first one beat Kortsjnoj in Leningrad 1951 and the second Tal in Tbilisi 1959. The openings they used, belong to TopNotch's favourites  Grin
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
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Re: Game collections
Reply #22 - 08/15/05 at 22:02:28
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But Alekhine does not trouble us in his annotations, which is the whole point.  If someone wants us to read his annotated games, he should write well, and write truly about chess.  


He certainly does.  His annotations are quite snotty toward Capablanca, for instance. 
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #21 - 08/15/05 at 21:31:21
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TN,


You're right, Lutikov's games would be interesting. (Just the games against Tal alone are fascinating)  How about a collection of Deep Fritz' best games, annotated by the great chip itself?   Wink  I am joking, but I know that it won't be long before someone at ChessBase comes up with the idea!

There was once an idea for a series of best games of anyone who broke 2700.  I think they published maybe two volumes before calling it quits.  I still would love to see such a series created.

BTW, the main reason I didn't include the Second Piatgorsky Cup among the great tournament books was the packaging.  It's little more than a pamphlet and will fall apart if I go through it one more time.  It is a classic because of the commentaries by the participants.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #20 - 08/15/05 at 20:21:29
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I'd love to see a collection of Duncan Suttles's games.

One often overlooked but fantastic games collection is Grigory Sanakoev's World Champion at the Third Attempt.  Sanakoev was a correspondence world champion, and his book is full of fighting chess and lots of excellent analysis...
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #19 - 08/15/05 at 19:31:41
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Quote:
It is amazing how my thread got hi-jacked with all this tournament book discussion.  Grin  Grin


To get back on track,  Jacob Yukhtman could do with a game collection. A truly remarkable player.

No doubt most of you are going Jacob who? another little known player worthy of a game collection is Anatoly Lutikov.

Toppylov Grin
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #18 - 08/15/05 at 16:29:25
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"My Best Games of Chess, 1908-1937 by Alekhine"


Alekhine doctored games in his book either they didn't happen like  Alekhine-Tenner 1907, he changes the move order or the endings aren't what was really played by his opponent!







  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #17 - 08/15/05 at 16:06:22
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"What are your favorite game collections (on one player not tournament books or books like the Kasparov series)


These are my favorite ones:

Karpov's Best Games,Bobby Fischer: My 60 Memorable Games, My Chess Career by Jose Capablanca, Kasparov Greatest Chess Games but my favorite out of all of my books is Paul Keres: Road to The top this is a very very good book with excellent annotation!









Grin Grin Grin Grin Cheesy
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #16 - 08/15/05 at 13:22:29
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This comment is a complete non sequitur.  Korchnoi was not criticised for his play, but for his unpleasant, uninformative writing.


I didn't mean for that line to be taken seriously.  That is why I included the  Grin  which you left out in your quote from my post.   I was trying to tease Smyslov_Fan gently.  For the record, I don't think Smyslov is anything other then a great player whose games we can all profit from.

I have never studied Alekhine's games/annotations in great depth.  From what I do know of them they were at times (at least) rather pompous and self-serving.  Still, I feel even stronger about his contribution to chess then I do about Smyslov's.
  

We work in the dark - we do what we can - we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art. &&~ Henry James
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Re: Game collections
Reply #15 - 08/15/05 at 13:04:46
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Thanks, Smyslov_Fan.  I actually have the Speelman book. 

Bile?  IT IS KORCHNOI!!  Of course there is bile.  Should we think less of Alekhine's game collections because he was an arrogant jerk who fabricated some of his game scores? 


But Alekhine does not trouble us in his annotations, which is the whole point.  If someone wants us to read his annotated games, he should write well, and write truly about chess.   

Quote:
Should we think less of Smyslov's games because they are so dull?   


This comment is a complete non sequitur.  Korchnoi was not criticised for his play, but for his unpleasant, uninformative writing.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #14 - 08/15/05 at 12:14:51
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It is amazing how my thread got hi-jacked with all this tournament book discussion.  Grin  Grin

That is ok.  I'll mention one myself.  The new one by Jan Timman, Curacao 1962.  I just got it a week or so ago.  I don't know that it will be a true classic because some of the annotations have the whiff of being an afterthought.  Perhaps that isn't fair because I only just got the book.  Still,  I will already state that it is a book well worth getting.  This was a fascinating and important event and if you love chess history (and historical photographs) that is reason enough to get it.
  

We work in the dark - we do what we can - we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art. &&~ Henry James
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Re: Game collections
Reply #13 - 08/15/05 at 12:03:11
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Actually, for tournament books I'd pick (after Zurich 1953) Botvinnik's Soviet Chess Championship, 1941, AVRO 1938 and First Piatgorsky Cup by Kashdan.  But then, where would Tri matcha anatolya karpova by Botvinnik (I don't know the English title, if there is one) fit in?  It covers three Candidates' matches from 1974.


I love the Second Piatgorsky Cup, or Santa Monica '66, because of the way the games are independently annotated by both grandmasters, and how often they disagree with each other.  Occasionally the battles are strictly over the tactics, in which case you can see why someone lost!  But most often they have different ways of interpreting what actually happened in the game. 

If more tournament books were done in that format, I'd buy all of them, and spend far too much money on chess books.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #12 - 08/15/05 at 10:36:03
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Btw Prince-Nez,

Huebner's book was published in English but is almost impossible to find these days.  You might be able to find Jon Speelman's Best Games which also has about ten pages per game worth of notes!

Korchnoi's two volumes My Best Games is an exercise in bile.  He berates his opponents and complains that they don't understand the most basic principles of opening/positional/endgame play.  His game selection isn't even "great".  His 400 Games contains many better games and more objective analysis.


Thanks, Smyslov_Fan.  I actually have the Speelman book. 

Bile?  IT IS KORCHNOI!!  Of course there is bile.   Grin  Should we think less of Alekhine's game collections because he was an arrogant jerk who fabricated some of his game scores?  Should we think less of Smyslov's games because they are so dull?   Grin   I am a fan or Korchnoi's and I stand by my recommendation of those books.

However, I made a mistake.   It is very hard to single one collection out.   There are so many good ones.  Still, I don't know how the two Keres' volumes that Markovich mentioned escaped my mind.  Those are great, great books that I think more players could profit from then the Korchnoi volumes.
  

We work in the dark - we do what we can - we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art. &&~ Henry James
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Re: Game collections
Reply #11 - 08/15/05 at 10:16:25
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Well ive got:

1) Life & Games of Mikhail Tal -Tal
2) Mikhail Tal's 50 best games - Clarke
3) Spassky's 100 best Games -Barden
4) My 60 Memorable games - Fischer (faber)
5) My 50 yrs of Chess - Marshall
6) Capablanca's 100 best games -Golombek.

1) & 5) apart from having good games & brief explanations of ideas of certain moves also have plenty of light hearted & amusing anecdotes. But 1  also contain highlighted parts of  certain games, so not all games are complete games.

2) are 50 full games of Tal from his early days to the time he won the Wch from Botvinnik. Full of his typically speculative sacrifices all over.

3) & 6) have nicely written autobiographies of the player concerned. In 3, there are a few KG games including that 'James Bond' one against Bronstein. Quite a nomber of Saemisch games against the KID which is quite typical of Spassky. I didnt realyl enjoy 6) for the want of more action from Capa.....but have to admit his handling of the various positions & his positional judgement & feel is really sublime.

4) has a lot of very heavy going analysis of variations and sub variations which at my level is most of the time pretty unfathomable. But i like the games & try to pick out the ideas of both positional & tactical themes involved. As you play thro more games you will also see that Fischer isnt a full blooded tactical player like Tal or Marshall always on a lookout for a sac or a swindle. he is more of a very aggressive version of Capablanca! - aggressive positional play building up to neat attacks later (some games dont even have sacs). I like his candid observations and comments of certain key positions or of his opponents. Larry Evans wrote good & sometimes witty introductions to each game.

If I had to choose just one..... Probably Fischer.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #10 - 08/15/05 at 07:53:44
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Kere's selected games of chess annotated by himself, currently published in two volumes named, respectively Paul Keres: The Quest for Perfection and Paul Keres: The Road to the Top, constitute by far the best game collection that I have ever read.

I learned a great deal about chess from reading the Great Man's ideas, which address not only technical issues but fighting considerations too.  The analyses are neither too detailed nor too sparse. 

These volumes basically reprint, in alebraic notation, a previous three-volume set brilliantly edited by Harry Golombek, and the absence of Golombek's name from the cover is deeply offensive to the gods.  Instead all the ostensible credit goes to John Nunn, whose main contribution seems to have been to check Kere's analyses with a computer and point out his occasional mistakes.  Nunn does, at least, provide a few extra games and does mention Golombek in his introduction. 

I do suspect that the decision to omit Golombek's deserved credit was not Nunn's, but Batsford's.

I also think that Frank Marshall's My Fifty Years of Chess is a cheerful and entertaining collection. It brims with sharp tactics and crafty swindles.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #9 - 08/15/05 at 04:55:49
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I assume *Game Collection* does not necessarily mean same player's games. My favourite is Zurich International. I have just ordered Understanding Chess Move by Move, based on a recommendation from a GM. Any views?

I have it. It is decent, but I find it very inconsistent. On the one hand you get very deep analysis or comments at some points, but on other points he talks like his audience consists of people who just learned chess. It is certainly not a bad book, but I am unsure about its value.

My favourite games collection is Uhlmann's winning with the french. I learned more from it than from any other opening or complete games book.
Two other books I very much liked are not really game collections:
-Flear's mastering the endgame in which he mixes his own endgames with theory. I found that very insightfull, though the endgames are very tough to understand at one read.
-Donner's the king. Collection of his writings, which are very funny when you're dutch. Iirc there are only three analysis of his own games, but they absolutely entertaining. The most brilliant one is his win over Velimirovic in a Benoni in which he gets completely run over by black, but wins in a spectecular endgame.
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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Re: Game collections
Reply #8 - 08/15/05 at 03:47:22
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Well Castlerock,

You're the first to have given How to Learn from Your Mistakes a thumbs up!  I own it and did profit from some of the analysis of Larsen's games (Scandinavian and Petrov's openings), but the most interesting losses had almost no notes whatsoever.  I wouldn't rank it as one of the great books.  I did however neglect a whole slew of great books including collections by Nunn, Geller, Kramnik, Gelfand (mentioned elsewhere), Capa, Bronstein, Keres, Kasparov, Botvinnik, Anand....

As I said, the list of great books seems endless!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #7 - 08/15/05 at 03:04:18
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Nobody has menstioned that lovely little book, Learn from your mistakes by Karpov. It's a good book.
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #6 - 08/15/05 at 01:46:47
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Btw Prince-Nez,

Huebner's book was published in English but is almost impossible to find these days.  You might be able to find Jon Speelman's Best Games which also has about ten pages per game worth of notes!

Korchnoi's two volumes My Best Games is an exercise in bile.  He berates his opponents and complains that they don't understand the most basic principles of opening/positional/endgame play.  His game selection isn't even "great".  His 400 Games contains many better games and more objective analysis.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #5 - 08/15/05 at 01:38:53
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Actually, for tournament books I'd pick (after Zurich 1953) Botvinnik's Soviet Chess Championship, 1941, AVRO 1938 and First Piatgorsky Cup by Kashdan.  But then, where would Tri matcha anatolya karpova by Botvinnik (I don't know the English title, if there is one) fit in?  It covers three Candidates' matches from 1974.

Oh well... As far as game collections go, Tal's Life and Games is a favorite, and both volumes of Fire on Board by Shirov are excellent. 


My sentimental favorites are:   My Best Games of Chess, 1908-1937 by Alekhine, Rubinstein's Chess Masterpieces, Taimanov's Selected Games, My Sixty Memorable Games, V Pockakh Garmonii (In Pursuit of Harmony) by Smyslov (of course), and The Games of Tigran Petrosian (two volumes) by Shekhtman.

Do I have to pick just one???

There are other game collections that deserve to be mentioned because of their fantastic analysis.  These include Power Chess by Keres, The Art of Chess Analysis by Timman, and yes MNb, The Art of Sacrifice as well as the indispensible Mammoth Book of The World's Greatest Chess Games.

Phew.  I've only scratched the surface of great books.  I can ruthlessly say who is a better chess player, but to choose one great book over another is too hard!
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #4 - 08/15/05 at 00:36:24
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Sure, we could start a separate thread for tournament books, though I'm afraid Zurich and Santa Monica '66 would garner 90% of the votes.

I'll give my favorite collections, then ones that I think are overrated, then what I'm going through now, then what I want to see, but haven't yet. 

Favorite collections:  I like the Larsen collection.  I was just playing through one of his Bird games earlier today against Spassky, where he plays 1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. e3 g6 4. b5!? 

Tal's best games are great.  It's so anecdotally written that it's fun just to read through without hardly a reference to the actual chess, though that, being Tal, is of course exciting stuff.

I've always had a soft spot for Keres' collection, maybe just because it was my first one.  I like Nimzovich's "collection" at the back of _My System_, though I'm afraid my chess was worse after playing those games, because his style is contagious and dogmatic.  Uhlman's _Winning with the French_ is probably the one I've played through the most, though of course all the games are Frenches. 

Overrated:  I imagine a lot of people are going to say Fisher's 60 games, but that one was always too dry for me.  Most of the actual English seems like it's in one word sentences, "Not", "but", "intending", etc.

Current collection:  the one I'm playing through now is a combined volume of Alekhines best games, I and II.  I like his games because they seem so simple compared to modern games, so that it's easy to see how he executes his plans.  However, he's something of a snotty annotator.  He loves to make Capablanca look bad; he loves to give short, cryptic "explanations" that can sometimes be tough to figure out but certainly demonstrate how smart he is; he loves to give a move an exclamation mark and then twenty moves later say "The point!" to prove he saw that far ahead.  Still, I'm getting a lot out of it.

Next collection:  I'd love to get Botvinnik's collected games, but yow, those books are expensive.  What's with Botvinnik?  Why, of all world champions, are his games worth so much more moolah than anyone else's?  I particular want them for his French and Dutch Stonewall games, so rats.
  
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Re: Game collections
Reply #3 - 08/14/05 at 23:52:01
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I assume *Game Collection* does not necessarily mean same player's games. My favourite is Zurich International. I have just ordered Understanding Chess Move by Move, based on a recommendation from a GM. Any views?



No, I meant a single player's collection like Alekhine's Best Games or Tal's or whomever you like.

Still, I agree on Zurich.   It is a classic.
  

We work in the dark - we do what we can - we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art. &&~ Henry James
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Re: Game collections
Reply #2 - 08/14/05 at 23:44:02
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I assume *Game Collection* does not necessarily mean same player's games. My favourite is Zurich International. I have just ordered Understanding Chess Move by Move, based on a recommendation from a GM. Any views?
  

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Re: Game collections
Reply #1 - 08/14/05 at 21:23:39
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My favourite: The art of sacrifice.
Necessary: Velimirovic, especially a collection of games with piece sacrifices in the Sicilian.
  

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Game collections
08/14/05 at 18:25:25
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My favorite type of chess books are player's game collections (especially when they are written by the players themselves).   They are my favorite because studying a great player's games is one of the essential ways to improve but a great player game collection will also usually have some interesting chess history and biography in it.  They are a pleasure to read and as long as chess exists (real chess!) they will never go out of style.

What are your favorite game collections (on one player not tournament books or books like the Kasparov series)?   

Which players are in need of a great game collection?

I love the recent two volume set of Korchnoi's games by Edition Olms.   I'd feel foolish to even give specific praise.  It's Korchnoi!  They are a must!  Boris Gelfand just brought out a game collection and it looks quite good but perhaps particularly for stronger players.

Who needs one?  I wish Bent Larsen in his twilight years would write another one.  His only game collection came out in the 60's.  There was another book on his games by another player in the 80s (I can't recall who even though I have this book and it is signed by Larsen himself!)  Also, has Robert Huebner ever written a book on his games.  I am not aware of one in English.  If memory serves, he was famous/infamous for his lengthy annotations in Informant so I'd love to see a book by him on his games.
  

We work in the dark - we do what we can - we give what we have. Our doubt is our passion and our passion is our task. The rest is the madness of art. &&~ Henry James
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