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Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) 1.e3 and 1...e6 (Read 4185 times)
Smyslov_Fan
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #14 - 09/19/05 at 13:50:47
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I really don't like to recommend the modern set-ups for Black because they just are too passive for most players.  Here, I agree completely with Semkov that your players should be playing classical openings.  I'd much rather play the White side of a King's Indian than the Black side, especially in a youth tournament. 

When I was in high school, I played the Queen's gambit for the first time.  I had never studied 1.d4 d5 2.c4 before, but I had analysed the Fischer-Spassky match (played a decade before) and discovered that high school students in my area had never even seen it before.  I won a bunch of games based on no theory whatsoever except controlling the center and attacking like crazy.  I know today's best high school players are much more sophisticated today, but I've been seeing successful high school students play the Slav (classical)as Black and Sicilians against 1.e4. 

The single biggest problem with playing 1...e5 in a major scholastic tournament is that the lower rated player who has little tournament experience is most likely to pull an upset as White against 1...e5 because that's what he knows best.  Of course, I also love the French.  The games you showed me suggest that it may be an excellent weapon.  Who needs surprise openings if the opponents don't understand the main-line (classical) openings in the first place!
  
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castlerock
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #13 - 09/19/05 at 13:21:27
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At last I was able to look at this. Thanks for your time Smyslov_Fan. Your suggestion of looking at old indian as a black side defence is excellent. Games, I think, will unfold beautifully. Alternatively d5 is also equally fine.

As regards white, 1.e4 is just too much of risk. We are 1.d4 players. I'm wondering whether Modern set up with d4,c4,e4,Nc3,Nf3 with idea of quick c5 will work. Any ideas?
  

CastleRock
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #12 - 09/17/05 at 01:44:17
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Castlerock,

I think I've more than evened the score with what you gave me.  I wasn't expecting a bunch of Under 12 year olds to play so well positionally.  Ok, so most of them didn't but still... This was hard work!  you owe me at least a nice garam masala or chutney!  Grin

Here's the analysis of the openings.  I didn't go into the endgames very much.



Rajesh,V (2157) - Atabayev,Y (1599)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (2.9), 21.07.2005

1.e3 Nf6 2.g3 e5 3.Bg2 d5 4.Ne2 Bd6 5.d4 e4 6.c4 c6 7.Qb3 Qb6?!  This just ruins Black’s pawn chain and the trade of queens will benefit White in the upcoming battle for the center. 8.Qc2?! (Perhaps White is hoping for more, but the queen trade certainly gave White an advantage.  So, where has Black gone wrong?  I think it was in trying for a reversed French.  Black doesn’t have the time to be pushing pawns; he needs to develop his pieces.  One of the main culprit moves here was 4…Bd6 which attacked….nothing.) Qd8 (this shows the bankruptcy of Black’s plan.)  9.Nbc3 0-0 10.0-0 Be6 11.Bd2 a5(Okay, I’m going to stop here.  Fritz doesn’t see much for White, but Black’s pieces are misplaced and he’s voluntarily weakening the Q-side for no apparent reason.  This is just an example of one player being outclassed by another.)  12.Rac1 Re8 13.cxd5 cxd5 14.Nb5 Nc6 15.Nxd6 Qxd6 16.Qc5 Qxc5 17.Rxc5 Nd7 18.Rb5 b6 19.Nf4 Na7 20.Rb3 Rac8 21.f3 Rc2 22.Rf2 a4 23.Rc3 Rxc3 24.bxc3 exf3 25.Bxf3 Nf6 26.c4 Rd8 27.c5 bxc5 28.dxc5 Rc8 29.Bb4 g5 30.Nxe6 fxe6 31.Bg2 Nd7 32.Bh3 Re8 33.Rc2 Nc6 34.a3 Kf7 35.Bf1 Rb8 36.Bc3 Rb3 37.Bb2 Ncb8 38.Bc1 Nc6 39.Rf2+ Ke8 40.Rc2 h6 41.Kg2 Kd8 42.Kf2 Kc7 43.Bh3 Nd8 44.Bb2 Kc6 45.e4 dxe4 46.Bg2 Kd5 47.Rd2+ Kxc5 48.Bxe4 Nb8 49.Bd4+ Kc4 50.Be3 Ndc6 51.Rd6 Ne5 52.h3 Rxa3 53.Rxe6 Nd3+ 54.Bxd3+ Rxd3 55.Rxh6 a3 56.Bxg5 a2 57.Bf6 Rd6 58.Rh4+ Kb3 59.Ba1 Nc6 60.Rh7 Rd1 61.Bf6 Rc1 62.Rb7+ Nb4 63.h4 Rc2+ 64.Kf3 Rc6 65.Bg7 Ka3 66.h5 Nc2 67.h6 Rxh6 68.Bxh6 a1Q 69.Ra7+ Kb4 70.Rxa1 Nxa1 71.Ke4 Kc5 72.Bf4 Kc6 73.Kf5 Kd7 74.Kf6 Ke8 75.Bh6 Nb3 76.g4 Nd4 77.g5 Nc6 78.g6 Ne7 79.g7 Kd7 80.Bf4 Ke8 81.Bd6 Ng8+ 82.Kg6 Kd7 83.Bf4 Ke6 84.Bg5 Ne7+ 85.Bxe7 Kxe7 1-0



Christer,J (1947) - Rajesh,V (2157)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (3. 

1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.Nf3 Bg7 4.c4(White is hoping to enter some sort of KID, but this seems to be wishful thinking.) Ne7 5.Nc3 d5 6.Bg5 (I’d play 6.cd5 ed5 7.e5, but then Black has thematic breaks with …c5 and f6.  So maybe the mistake is again as early as move four!) f6 7.Bh4 dxe4 8.Nxe4 0-0 9.Be2 g5 (This is a thematic way to virtually win a piece.  White’s minor pieces are tripping over each other because they don’t have any idea where to go!) 10.Bg3 g4 11.Nfd2 f5 12.Nc3 Bxd4 (Black has clearly won the opening!)  13.Qc2 Ng6 14.f4 h5 15.0-0-0 h4 16.Nb3 Be3+ 17.Kb1 Qf6 18.Rd3 Bxf4 19.Bf2 Nc6 20.Bc5 Re8 21.g3 b6 22.Ba3 Be5 23.Rf1 Qg7 24.Rfd1 Bxc3 25.Rxc3 e5 26.c5 Nd4 27.Nxd4 exd4 28.Bc4+ Kh8 29.Rcd3 Rd8 30.Qg2 Rb8 31.c6 f4 32.Qe4 Qf6 33.b3 Bf5 34.Qe2 b5 0-1




The following game was one of the most interesting and difficult to annotate.
Nyzhnyk,I (2131) - Rajesh,V (2157)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (5.2), 23.07.2005

1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.Nf3 Bg7 4.Be2 (This makes more sense than 4.c4.  It’s flexible and has some hope of developing meaningful k-side play.  Another idea is to play 4.Be3 and 5.Nbd2.  I also like the more direct method of charging ahead with 4.h4!?) Ne7 5.0-0 d5 6.e5 c5 7.c3 Qb6 (This is just a good version of the Advanced French for White!  The dark-squared Bishop is useless on the long diagonal unless White makes a big mistake somewhere.  Fritz is jumping up and down saying 8.dc5 is good for White. I don’t believe it.  I much prefer Nyznyk’s idea, but I’m not sure about his 9th move.  Why does the R have to move to b1?) 8.Na3 Bd7 9.Rb1 (Now I agree with the computer, 9.dxc5 is both thematic and great for White here.  9.Re1 threatening to take on c5 is also good!) Nbc6 10.Nc2 0-0 11.b4 (Superficially, this is consistent with 9.Rb1, but it doesn’t ring true to the position.  I don’t see why White is playing for a q-side pawn storm with his Rook on b1 instead of c1.  White should be playing for central and King-side pressure.) cxd4 12.cxd4 f6 13.Ba3 (Huh??? This doesn’t make any sense to me.  Fritz is at least asking for 13.b5!? which it claims to be clearly better for White.  I’d also consider 13.ef6 Bf6 14.Bh6!) Qd8? (I don’t get what’s wrong with 13…a6.) 14.b5 Na5 15.Qd2 (Fritz has found the human idea of 15.Ne3! For me, the idea is to try to occupy e5 with a N.  Fritz only sees tactics, but agrees with me.  Pretty Scary!  (13.ef6 Rf6 14.Ne3 leads to very similar situations.) b6 16.Rfc1 (I’m not sure, but I think this is the wrong formation at the wrong time. White can always contest the c-file, but he can’t always get two Knights to attack on the k-side.) fxe5 17.Nxe5 Re8 18.f4  (18.Ne3!  White is still better, which shows the bankruptcy of Black’s idea.  Yet 18.f4 does nothing for White.) Nf5 19.g3 Rc8 20.Ne3 (Yay.) Bxe5 21.dxe5!? Nxe3 22.Qxe3 Nc4 23.Bxc4 Rxc4 24.Rxc4 dxc4 25.Qd4 Qc7 26.Bd6 Qb7 27.Rb4?  (Keep it simple, stupid!  (KISS:  This is a basic principle stated in American slang. When you have a won game, keep it simple, don’t try to be too cute.)  Rc8 (27…Qf3 was an even clearer way to guarantee the draw.)  28.Rxc4 Bxb5 29.Rxc8+ Qxc8 30.Ba3 Qd7 31.Qd6 Qxd6 32.Bxd6 (Equal) Bc4 33.a3 Kf7 34.Kf2 Ke8 35.Ke3 Kd7 36.Kd4 Bd5 37.Bb4 Kc6 38.Bd6 Kb5 39.Bf8 Bf3 40.Be7 Ka4 41.Kc3 Bd5 42.Bb4 Bf3 43.Bd6 Kb5 44.Kd4 Bg4 45.Bb8 Kc6 46.Bd6 Bf5 47.h4 Kb5 48.Bf8 Ka4 49.Kc3 a5 50.Bd6 Bg4 51.Bf8 Kb5 52.Kd4 Bf5 ½-½



Rajesh,V (2157) - Sjugirov,S (235  [A00]
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (6.1)

1.e3 Nf6 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Ne2 0-0 5.d4 d6 6.0-0 Nbd7 7.c4 e5 (We’ve transposed into an Old Indian.  This is an interesting choice for Black.  White seems just fine with the transposition though.  Are you sure we’re dealing with someone under 12 years old?  Wow!) 8.Nbc3 Re8 9.b3 Nf8 10.Bb2 e4 11.Qc2 Bf5 12.d5 Qc8 13.Rad1 Bh3 14.Rd4 Bxg2 15.Kxg2 Qf5 16.Rdd1 Qf3+ 17.Kg1 a6 18.Nd4 Qh5 19.Kg2 N8d7 20.Qe2 Qe5 21.b4 Qe7 22.Nb3 Ne5 23.c5 Nd3 24.Ba3 Nh5 25.Na4 Qg5 26.Kh1 Qxd5 27.cxd6 b5 28.Nb2 cxd6 29.Kg1 Bxb2 30.Bxb2 Qc4 31.Ba1 Qxb4 32.f3 d5 33.fxe4 dxe4 34.g4 Ng7 35.Nc1 Ne5 36.Rd4 Nc4 37.Qf2 f5 38.Rd7 Ne5 39.Rxg7+ Kxg7 40.gxf5 Kg8 41.fxg6 Nf3+ 42.Kh1 Qd6 43.gxh7+ Kxh7 44.Ne2 Re6 45.Qg2 Qd8 0-1



Matuszewski,M (1999) - Rajesh,V (2157)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (7.7)

1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.f4 (This makes sense.)  Bg7 4.Nf3 Ne7 5.Nc3 d5 6.e5 0-0 7.Be3 Nd7 8.Be2 c5 9.dxc5 (I’m not so sure about this here.  It’s probably fine, but seems a bit inconsistent.) f6 10.exf6 Bxf6 11.0-0 (White should have tried to castle Q-side, and attack K-side with pieces and pawns.) Nf5 12.Bf2 Qc7 13.Nxd5 exd5 14.Qxd5+ Kh8 15.Ng5 Qc6 16.Qxc6 bxc6 17.Ne6 Rf7 18.Nc7 Rb8 19.Bc4 Re7 20.Rae1 Rb7 21.Ne8 Rb4 22.b3 Bc3 23.Rxe7 Nxe7 24.Nd6 0-1



Rajesh,V (2157) - Arribas Lopez,A (2140)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (8.4), 26.07.2005

1.e3 e5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 Be7 4.Ne2 d5 5.d4 e4 6.c4 c6 7.Qb3 0-0 8.Nbc3 Re8 9.cxd5 cxd5 10.Nf4 (Ok, we finally get to see White’s main idea in action here.    He’s a pawn up, but a bit behind in development.) Nc6 11.Nfxd5 Nxd5 12.Qxd5 Nb4 (I think Black has miscalculated.  He probably was banking on 13.Qd8 Nd3+?? 12….Qd5 was a more realistic attempt to maintain some semblance of a balance.)13.Qxd8 Bxd8 14.0-0 (And White is now a pawn up with a slightly better position.   Game over.) Bf5 15.Bd2 Nd3 16.b3 Bg6 17.Nd5 Rc8 18.Nb4 Ba5 19.Nxd3 Bxd2 20.Nf4 Bf5 21.Rfd1 Rc2 22.h3 h6 23.g4 Bd7 24.Bf1 b6 25.Bc4 Kf8 26.a4 Rc8 27.Nh5 f5 28.gxf5 Bxf5 29.Ng3 Bxh3 30.Nxe4 Bb4 31.Rdc1 Rxc1+ 32.Rxc1 Rc6 33.Kh2 Bg4 34.Kg3 Rg6 35.Kf4 Bd7 36.Be2 Re6 37.Rc7 g5+ 38.Kf3 Bc6 39.Rc8+ Kg7 40.Bd3 a5 41.Rd8 Re7 42.d5 Bd7 43.Ng3 Rf7+ 44.Kg2 Kf6 45.Rg8 Ke7 46.Rg6 Bg4 47.Be4 Rf6 48.Rg7+ Kd8 49.f3 Bd7 50.Bd3 Rd6 51.Bc4 Be8 52.Rg8 Rg6 53.Rh8 Bc3 54.Rh7 Bd7 55.Bd3 Rg8 56.Rxh6 Bd2 57.Kf2 Kc7 58.Ne4 Bc1 59.Rh7 Bb2 60.Bb5 Rg7 61.Rxg7 Bxg7 62.Bxd7 Kxd7 63.Nxg5 Kd6 64.e4 Bf6 65.Ne6 1-0



Ter Sahakyan,S (2140) - Rajesh,V (2157)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (9.3)

1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.h4 (Good idea!!)h5 4.Bg5 f6 (Now where does the Black king go??)5.Be3 Bg7 6.Nc3 Ne7 7.Qd2 d5 8.0-0-0 b6 9.f3 Nd7 10.g4 dxe4 11.gxh5 Nf5 12.hxg6 exf3 13.Bf4 Bb7 14.Qf2 Nf8 15.d5 e5 16.Bb5+ Ke7 (Oh, he gets crushed in the center of the board!  What a surprise!) 17.Qxf3 Nd6 18.Be3 Nxg6 19.h5 Nf4 20.Bxf4 exf4 21.Nh3 Kf7 22.Bd3 f5 23.Rhg1 Bh6 24.Kb1 Rg8 25.Nxf4 Bxf4 26.Qxf4 Qf6 27.Bb5 Rac8 28.Bd7 1-0



Rajesh,V (2157) - Rzayev,B (1599)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (10.5)

1.e3 d5 2.g3 e5 3.Bg2 Nf6 4.Ne2 Bd6 5.d4 e4 6.c4 c6 7.Qb3 0-0 8.Nbc3 b6 (What’s this about?  Oh yeah, another case of an outclassed opponent.    Nevermind.) 9.0-0 Be6 10.cxd5 cxd5 11.f3 exf3 12.Bxf3 Bc7 13.Bd2 Nc6 14.Nb5 Rc8 15.Nxc7 Rxc7 16.Nf4 Qd7 17.Rac1 Rfc8 18.Bc3 Na5 19.Qd1 Nc4 20.Qe2 Nd6 21.Nxe6 Qxe6 22.Qd3 Nfe4 23.Bg2 Re7 24.Bb4 Rce8 25.Rc6 Qd7 26.Qc2 Nc4 27.Rxc4 dxc4 28.Bxe7 Qxe7 29.Bxe4 Qxe4 30.Qxe4 Rxe4 31.Kf2 Re7 32.Rc1 Rc7 33.e4 Kf8 34.Ke3 Ke7 35.d5 Kd8 36.Kd4 b5 37.e5 a6 38.d6 Rc6 39.Kd5 Kd7 40.Rf1 Rc8 41.Rxf7+ Ke8 42.d7+ 1-0


I hope this helps you.  In a nutshell, White doesn't lose by playing the way he does, and sometimes gets interesting positions.  Black shouldn't overpress as if White has made some grotesque blunder.  I prefer 1...d5 to e5 here, and perhaps transpose into some sort of Catalan or QGD or Slav.  I doubt that White has any advantage in any other system.

When facing this as White, there seem to be a couple of excellent ways to address Black's set-up.  The first is to try to get an Advanced French set-up with Black having committed the rather bizarre and tempo-wasting idea of g6 and Bg7.  This should be plenty for the advantage.  The other way is to attack the king-side immediately with h4.  After that, Black can either counter with ...h5 (which makes sense) and leave his king in the center to be hunted down, or pretend White's bluffing and get creamed on the k-side.

The main point to drive home is that Rajesh is a dangerous player, and you have to make your moves count in order to beat him.  He's giving up a small amount by playing this rathe eccentric opening, but he and it shouldn't be underestimated.

Good Luck in the Tournament!

Let me know if any of this helps!

  
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Smyslov_Fan
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #11 - 09/10/05 at 13:39:09
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Stick with the KID rather than the KIA. 

In order for Black to justify both e6 and g6, Black will pretty much have to try to transpose into a Benoni set-up, and you will probably be able to take advantage of the move order.  The only other reasonable attempt by Black if you play d4, c4, e4, is to try some sort of Dutch, and again you should be able to take advantage of the inferior move order.
  
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castlerock
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #10 - 09/10/05 at 05:23:23
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That's the problem with this opening. Half the timeopponent goes astray and loses the game.

My guess is that, from my stand point ...e6,...g6 doesn't pose much problem since I play 1.d4 and 2.c4. Game could be steered to known territory. Similarly for black, entering Kings Indian attack set up with d5,e6,Nf6,Be7,c5,Nc6,b6,Bb7,0-0 could be a safe option. Any views?
  

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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #9 - 09/09/05 at 06:04:35
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Just checked the Matuzewski game and it looks like white just didnt know what he was doing. He outrates me by quite some points, but this way of handling a french type position with the added bonus of g6 is a crime. You cant go exchanging off your centre pawns this way. Moves like dxc5 and exf6 hurt my eyes Shocked Shocked
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #8 - 09/08/05 at 11:30:57
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Castlerock,

I haven't forgotten you, but it will take me a while to go through these games and give you feedback.  Pls be patient with me! Smiley
  
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castlerock
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #7 - 09/06/05 at 21:38:25
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Here are some of the games to start with.



Rajesh,V (2157) - Atabayev,Y (1599)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (2.9), 21.07.2005

1.e3 Nf6 2.g3 e5 3.Bg2 d5 4.Ne2 Bd6 5.d4 e4 6.c4 c6 7.Qb3 Qb6 8.Qc2 Qd8 9.Nbc3 0-0 10.0-0 Be6 11.Bd2 a5 12.Rac1 Re8 13.cxd5 cxd5 14.Nb5 Nc6 15.Nxd6 Qxd6 16.Qc5 Qxc5 17.Rxc5 Nd7 18.Rb5 b6 19.Nf4 Na7 20.Rb3 Rac8 21.f3 Rc2 22.Rf2 a4 23.Rc3 Rxc3 24.bxc3 exf3 25.Bxf3 Nf6 26.c4 Rd8 27.c5 bxc5 28.dxc5 Rc8 29.Bb4 g5 30.Nxe6 fxe6 31.Bg2 Nd7 32.Bh3 Re8 33.Rc2 Nc6 34.a3 Kf7 35.Bf1 Rb8 36.Bc3 Rb3 37.Bb2 Ncb8 38.Bc1 Nc6 39.Rf2+ Ke8 40.Rc2 h6 41.Kg2 Kd8 42.Kf2 Kc7 43.Bh3 Nd8 44.Bb2 Kc6 45.e4 dxe4 46.Bg2 Kd5 47.Rd2+ Kxc5 48.Bxe4 Nb8 49.Bd4+ Kc4 50.Be3 Ndc6 51.Rd6 Ne5 52.h3 Rxa3 53.Rxe6 Nd3+ 54.Bxd3+ Rxd3 55.Rxh6 a3 56.Bxg5 a2 57.Bf6 Rd6 58.Rh4+ Kb3 59.Ba1 Nc6 60.Rh7 Rd1 61.Bf6 Rc1 62.Rb7+ Nb4 63.h4 Rc2+ 64.Kf3 Rc6 65.Bg7 Ka3 66.h5 Nc2 67.h6 Rxh6 68.Bxh6 a1Q 69.Ra7+ Kb4 70.Rxa1 Nxa1 71.Ke4 Kc5 72.Bf4 Kc6 73.Kf5 Kd7 74.Kf6 Ke8 75.Bh6 Nb3 76.g4 Nd4 77.g5 Nc6 78.g6 Ne7 79.g7 Kd7 80.Bf4 Ke8 81.Bd6 Ng8+ 82.Kg6 Kd7 83.Bf4 Ke6 84.Bg5 Ne7+ 85.Bxe7 Kxe7 1-0



Christer,J (1947) - Rajesh,V (2157)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (3.8)

1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.Nf3 Bg7 4.c4 Ne7 5.Nc3 d5 6.Bg5 f6 7.Bh4 dxe4 8.Nxe4 0-0 9.Be2 g5 10.Bg3 g4 11.Nfd2 f5 12.Nc3 Bxd4 13.Qc2 Ng6 14.f4 h5 15.0-0-0 h4 16.Nb3 Be3+ 17.Kb1 Qf6 18.Rd3 Bxf4 19.Bf2 Nc6 20.Bc5 Re8 21.g3 b6 22.Ba3 Be5 23.Rf1 Qg7 24.Rfd1 Bxc3 25.Rxc3 e5 26.c5 Nd4 27.Nxd4 exd4 28.Bc4+ Kh8 29.Rcd3 Rd8 30.Qg2 Rb8 31.c6 f4 32.Qe4 Qf6 33.b3 Bf5 34.Qe2 b5 0-1



Nyzhnyk,I (2131) - Rajesh,V (2157)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (5.2), 23.07.2005

1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.Nf3 Bg7 4.Be2 Ne7 5.0-0 d5 6.e5 c5 7.c3 Qb6 8.Na3 Bd7 9.Rb1 Nbc6 10.Nc2 0-0 11.b4 cxd4 12.cxd4 f6 13.Ba3 Qd8 14.b5 Na5 15.Qd2 b6 16.Rfc1 fxe5 17.Nxe5 Re8 18.f4 Nf5 19.g3 Rc8 20.Ne3 Bxe5 21.dxe5 Nxe3 22.Qxe3 Nc4 23.Bxc4 Rxc4 24.Rxc4 dxc4 25.Qd4 Qc7 26.Bd6 Qb7 27.Rb4 Rc8 28.Rxc4 Bxb5 29.Rxc8+ Qxc8 30.Ba3 Qd7 31.Qd6 Qxd6 32.Bxd6 Bc4 33.a3 Kf7 34.Kf2 Ke8 35.Ke3 Kd7 36.Kd4 Bd5 37.Bb4 Kc6 38.Bd6 Kb5 39.Bf8 Bf3 40.Be7 Ka4 41.Kc3 Bd5 42.Bb4 Bf3 43.Bd6 Kb5 44.Kd4 Bg4 45.Bb8 Kc6 46.Bd6 Bf5 47.h4 Kb5 48.Bf8 Ka4 49.Kc3 a5 50.Bd6 Bg4 51.Bf8 Kb5 52.Kd4 Bf5 ½-½



Rajesh,V (2157) - Sjugirov,S (2358) [A00]
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (6.1)

1.e3 Nf6 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Ne2 0-0 5.d4 d6 6.0-0 Nbd7 7.c4 e5 8.Nbc3 Re8 9.b3 Nf8 10.Bb2 e4 11.Qc2 Bf5 12.d5 Qc8 13.Rad1 Bh3 14.Rd4 Bxg2 15.Kxg2 Qf5 16.Rdd1 Qf3+ 17.Kg1 a6 18.Nd4 Qh5 19.Kg2 N8d7 20.Qe2 Qe5 21.b4 Qe7 22.Nb3 Ne5 23.c5 Nd3 24.Ba3 Nh5 25.Na4 Qg5 26.Kh1 Qxd5 27.cxd6 b5 28.Nb2 cxd6 29.Kg1 Bxb2 30.Bxb2 Qc4 31.Ba1 Qxb4 32.f3 d5 33.fxe4 dxe4 34.g4 Ng7 35.Nc1 Ne5 36.Rd4 Nc4 37.Qf2 f5 38.Rd7 Ne5 39.Rxg7+ Kxg7 40.gxf5 Kg8 41.fxg6 Nf3+ 42.Kh1 Qd6 43.gxh7+ Kxh7 44.Ne2 Re6 45.Qg2 Qd8 0-1



Matuszewski,M (1999) - Rajesh,V (2157)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (7.7)

1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.f4 Bg7 4.Nf3 Ne7 5.Nc3 d5 6.e5 0-0 7.Be3 Nd7 8.Be2 c5 9.dxc5 f6 10.exf6 Bxf6 11.0-0 Nf5 12.Bf2 Qc7 13.Nxd5 exd5 14.Qxd5+ Kh8 15.Ng5 Qc6 16.Qxc6 bxc6 17.Ne6 Rf7 18.Nc7 Rb8 19.Bc4 Re7 20.Rae1 Rb7 21.Ne8 Rb4 22.b3 Bc3 23.Rxe7 Nxe7 24.Nd6 0-1



Rajesh,V (2157) - Arribas Lopez,A (2140)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (8.4), 26.07.2005

1.e3 e5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 Be7 4.Ne2 d5 5.d4 e4 6.c4 c6 7.Qb3 0-0 8.Nbc3 Re8 9.cxd5 cxd5 10.Nf4 Nc6 11.Nfxd5 Nxd5 12.Qxd5 Nb4 13.Qxd8 Bxd8 14.0-0 Bf5 15.Bd2 Nd3 16.b3 Bg6 17.Nd5 Rc8 18.Nb4 Ba5 19.Nxd3 Bxd2 20.Nf4 Bf5 21.Rfd1 Rc2 22.h3 h6 23.g4 Bd7 24.Bf1 b6 25.Bc4 Kf8 26.a4 Rc8 27.Nh5 f5 28.gxf5 Bxf5 29.Ng3 Bxh3 30.Nxe4 Bb4 31.Rdc1 Rxc1+ 32.Rxc1 Rc6 33.Kh2 Bg4 34.Kg3 Rg6 35.Kf4 Bd7 36.Be2 Re6 37.Rc7 g5+ 38.Kf3 Bc6 39.Rc8+ Kg7 40.Bd3 a5 41.Rd8 Re7 42.d5 Bd7 43.Ng3 Rf7+ 44.Kg2 Kf6 45.Rg8 Ke7 46.Rg6 Bg4 47.Be4 Rf6 48.Rg7+ Kd8 49.f3 Bd7 50.Bd3 Rd6 51.Bc4 Be8 52.Rg8 Rg6 53.Rh8 Bc3 54.Rh7 Bd7 55.Bd3 Rg8 56.Rxh6 Bd2 57.Kf2 Kc7 58.Ne4 Bc1 59.Rh7 Bb2 60.Bb5 Rg7 61.Rxg7 Bxg7 62.Bxd7 Kxd7 63.Nxg5 Kd6 64.e4 Bf6 65.Ne6 1-0



Ter Sahakyan,S (2140) - Rajesh,V (2157)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (9.3)

1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.h4 h5 4.Bg5 f6 5.Be3 Bg7 6.Nc3 Ne7 7.Qd2 d5 8.0-0-0 b6 9.f3 Nd7 10.g4 dxe4 11.gxh5 Nf5 12.hxg6 exf3 13.Bf4 Bb7 14.Qf2 Nf8 15.d5 e5 16.Bb5+ Ke7 17.Qxf3 Nd6 18.Be3 Nxg6 19.h5 Nf4 20.Bxf4 exf4 21.Nh3 Kf7 22.Bd3 f5 23.Rhg1 Bh6 24.Kb1 Rg8 25.Nxf4 Bxf4 26.Qxf4 Qf6 27.Bb5 Rac8 28.Bd7 1-0



Rajesh,V (2157) - Rzayev,B (1599)
Belfort YWCC boys under 12 Belfort (90) (10.5)

1.e3 d5 2.g3 e5 3.Bg2 Nf6 4.Ne2 Bd6 5.d4 e4 6.c4 c6 7.Qb3 0-0 8.Nbc3 b6 9.0-0 Be6 10.cxd5 cxd5 11.f3 exf3 12.Bxf3 Bc7 13.Bd2 Nc6 14.Nb5 Rc8 15.Nxc7 Rxc7 16.Nf4 Qd7 17.Rac1 Rfc8 18.Bc3 Na5 19.Qd1 Nc4 20.Qe2 Nd6 21.Nxe6 Qxe6 22.Qd3 Nfe4 23.Bg2 Re7 24.Bb4 Rce8 25.Rc6 Qd7 26.Qc2 Nc4 27.Rxc4 dxc4 28.Bxe7 Qxe7 29.Bxe4 Qxe4 30.Qxe4 Rxe4 31.Kf2 Re7 32.Rc1 Rc7 33.e4 Kf8 34.Ke3 Ke7 35.d5 Kd8 36.Kd4 b5 37.e5 a6 38.d6 Rc6 39.Kd5 Kd7 40.Rf1 Rc8 41.Rxf7+ Ke8 42.d7+ 1-0

  

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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #6 - 09/05/05 at 22:33:25
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Castlerock,

I'm looking forward to those games.  The opening is so amorphous that we really will need concrete examples to even have the beginnings of a discussion!
  
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #5 - 09/05/05 at 02:03:14
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Quote:
Maybe the system as Black is borderline ok.  But as White, it goes against everything I believe in!  White should try to use his initiative, not throw it away on purpose.


I'm not so sure. In this computer era, conersional and set-up oriented openings will make more and more sense to many people. Nakamura's 2.Qh5 Vs Sasikiran is an important pointer. The fact 1.Nc3 and Tango are getting popular is another pointer.

So I don't have disrespect for 1.e3 or 1...e6. I just want to find the best possible set up against this opening. I'll post some games today evening.
  

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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #4 - 09/04/05 at 14:37:41
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Maybe the system as Black is borderline ok.  But as White, it goes against everything I believe in!  White should try to use his initiative, not throw it away on purpose.
  
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #3 - 09/04/05 at 02:29:33
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I'm fully with you Smyslov_Fan, but the fact is other coaches try to punish this thinking it is a mistake and get punished in the bargain. A kid by name VAV Rajesh played this way in the world under 12 championship in France recently and scored 7.5 out of 10 and was in medal contention but unfortunately he lost the last round.

His elo is 2137 and is a decent player for his age. I have those games and I'll post them later. For example 1.e4 e6 2.d4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 and goes on to play Nge7, ...0-0 etc against 3.Nc3 French and ends up winning the game! Cry

It's something like your Brick for me! ???
  

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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #2 - 09/04/05 at 00:30:26
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I've seen that opening taught here in Colorado to young players, and I think it's a crime.  This opening teaches students to hunker down and hope nothing bad happens to them.  This is a guarantee that even a reasonably good player will make sure bad things happen!  It's got some name like "the firewall" or something.  But teaching an opening like this to new students is teaching kids to fear chess.  Chess is fun, and newbies should be encouraged to open up!
  
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Re: 1.e3 and 1...e6
Reply #1 - 09/03/05 at 09:49:15
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It just looks like a Hippopotamus.  See Andrew Martin's latest update, as well as his article on the Silman website.  In the Hippo, the queenside is usually developed the same way as the kingside.  Martin is coming out with a book on playing it with the black pieces.  Don't see why you couldn't play it with white as well.  At least you avoid a lot of theory.
  

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1.e3 and 1...e6
09/03/05 at 07:40:03
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I have trouble finding a suitable forum for this post. Well it looks like flank openings is the best place for the following:

There's a cult going on India in age category chess circuits. If white 1.e3,2.g3,3.Bg7,4.Ne2,5.0-0 - no matter what black plays. Similarly if black, 1...e6,2...g6,3...Bg7,4...Ne7,5...0-0, no matter what white plays. Typical break happens with d5 (d5) or d3 (d6) followed by c4 (c5). This system is, in practice, not very easy to counter. Any views?
  

CastleRock
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