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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Open Sicilian for the White amateur? (Read 17599 times)
woofwoof
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Re: Open Sicilian for the White amateur?
Reply #3 - 09/20/05 at 21:34:07
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I think that Bc4 is a good commom system that works against a no. of Sicilians - Najdorf, Classical & Scheveningen + it disallows the Dragon & Boleslavsky effectively. So its like a  '1 size fits all' more or less. The main idea is all the same too => to put pressure on the f7 so there are a couple of overlapping points with the ideas of the Italian. Thus less studying to do overall  Grin

The only other sysytem you need to learn would be the Ndb5 against the Kan/Paulsen.

later edit: MNb,your post came just before mine.  That's another great post from you!
  

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MNb
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Re: Open Sicilian for the White amateur?
Reply #2 - 09/20/05 at 21:31:19
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The good new is that not only Black has a wide choice, but White too. There are Nunn's three editions of Beat the Sicilian, there is Davies' repertoire based on 6.g3. It is also possible to found your repertoire on 6.Be2.
First question: what to do against The Najdorf? One cannot really say, that there is a superior system here. 6.Bg5 and 6.Be3 both demand a detailed theoretical knowledge. But there are some other options, dangerous enough in skilled hands. I'll give two examples of a more or less complete repertoire.
6.f4 e5 7.Nf3
6.f4 e6 7.Be2 striving for the piece sace Nd5, like Sznapik-Adamski, POLch 1978. This has been debated in another thread; maybe Willempie recalls which one.
6.Bc4 e6 7.Bb3 b5 8.Qf3 (see Golubev's book).

Your decision will influence your choice against the Scheveningen:
I dislike both 6.Be2 Nc6 7.Be3 Be7 8.o-o o-o 9.f4 e5 and 6.Bc4 Be7 followed by o-o and Na6. So:
6.g4 as the Keres Attack is still dangerous.
6.Be3 Be7 (a6 7.Be2 strives for the Sznapik-Adamski game and Nc6 7.Bc4 is the Sozin) 7.f4 followed by 8.Qf3 and 9.o-o-o.

Sozin: 6.Bc4 e6 (after Qb6 7.Nxc6 bxc6 8.o-o e6 9.Bf4 and g6 9.Be3 White has good attacking chances) 7.Be3 and 8.Bb3 gives White the choice between the Velimirovic Attack, the Fischer Attack (not so popular, but dangerous enough) and again a setup with f4 and Qf3. The choice can even depend on Black's move order.

The second question is: what to do against the Svesjnikov. White has not done very well in the main lines about last 5 years, so you might look at the positional 7.Nd5 variation. This means, you must avoid 2...Nc6/5...e6 6.Ndb5 d6 7.Bf4 e5 8.Bg5 though. The other option is 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.e5. You will also prefer 2...Nc6/4...e5 6.Nb5 d6 7.c4 against the Kalasjnikov.

The other Sicilian Defenses are relatively easier to meet, though I do not want to suggest that they are objectively worse.

Dragon: 9.o-o-o is quite feared these days. Karpov's variation 6.Be2 Bg7 7.o-o o-o 8.Nb3 Nc6 9.Bg5 or even 9.Kh1 first is also good.

Accelerated Dragon: Maroczy setup, but it has never been clear to me, what's against 5.Be2 Bg7 6.Nb3. It depends on the question, if Black can play d7-d5 somewhere.

Paulsen/Kan/Taimanov systems:
2...a6/4...e6 5.Bd3 keeps the option open to play c4 or not. Black can prevent this with 2...e6/4...Nc6 so 5.Nc3 a6 (we have already seen Nf6 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.e5) and now 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.Bd3 is a transposition to 2...a6/4...e6 5.Bd3 Nc6 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.Nc3.
White can also stick to 5.Nc3 and 6.Be2 of course. Black has several independent options in that case.

Hope this helps. If you expect to meet the Sicilian often, studying the Open systems will certainly pay off. I tried for a year, but decided it was not worth the effort when I got only four games in one year.
  

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Willempie
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Re: Open Sicilian for the White amateur?
Reply #1 - 09/20/05 at 16:50:08
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Sounds like a decent plan. I quit running away from sicilian theory as well and although you get the occassional setback by running into some trap, you get much more play out of the opening. Basically if you keep dodging the main variations, you will get stuck at some point. As an added bonus I have noticed that black players (below 1800) dont know much more theory or better said if they do they dont know how to react to non-theoretical but logical moves. With white you have a little bit more room for error.

If you aim for setups with Bc4, I think it is a good plan to look at Fischer's games in his 60 memorable games. I am not sure but I think there are also 1 or 2 games with an e6 setup by black.
  

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mad_knight
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Open Sicilian for the White amateur?
09/20/05 at 15:30:10
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Hi everyone,

I've never played the Open Sicilian because of its reputation as a theoretical nightmare.  I tried every Anti-Sicilian in the book but didn't like any of them except the Morra, because play is rather similar to that in the Open.  Alas, my opponents would mostly decline the gambit and transpose to the Alapin, which was OK if they'd play the d5 variation because I like playing IQP positions.  But most of my opponents would play the Nf6 variation instead, considered the better variation for Black, but I absolutely HATED playing it as White. Angry

Then I read some people on this forum saying:  in the lower regions of amateur play, theory doesn't matter that much, because most of your opponents don't know the theory either, and games are more often than not decided by mistakes rather than by the latest theoretical novelty.  This made a lot of sense and it prompted me to look again at the Open. Smiley

Edmar Mednis' "Practical Opening Tips" features a chapter on the Open Sicilian, in which he recommends White to play more or less the same piece placement based on the Sozin in all 2 ...d6 variations:  Dragon, Accelerated Dragon, Najdorf, Scheveningen and Classical.  At last, some order in the chaos of variations... So I also looked for such a "common denominator" for the non-2 ...d6 variations and after some analysis found out that all of them except the Kan could be met by 4 Nb5 or 5 Nb5 (depending on whether or not Black would play 4 ...Nf6) and pressure on the d5 square. Grin

This is of course only a framework for further study of the individual variations, but I think it'll make such study easier than without it.  I think even an amateur can and should play the Open and have fun, even if he doesn't necessarily play like a GM. Roll Eyes  The important thing, of course, is to take a correct start...  You guys think think this is a good way to start?

By the way, I've also considered playing the English Attack against anything Black would throw at me, which of course looks very attractive albeit a bit over-aggressive to my taste... And does it really work against ANYTHING?! ???

Look forward to your comments!
  

Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale her infinite variety - William Shakespeare
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