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Normal Topic Rubinstein 4 knights Question (Read 2723 times)
Willempie
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Re: Rubinstein 4 knights Question
Reply #5 - 09/26/05 at 03:45:43
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You could also check the variation 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc5 Bc5 4 Nc3 Nf6 5 Nd5. This is exactly the same variation with colours reversed and is sometimes recommended as an interesting sideline to the very quiet italian.
  

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MNb
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Re: Rubinstein 4 knights Question
Reply #4 - 09/25/05 at 20:03:44
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P is symbol for Paard indeed. We Dutch prefer the animal, Afrikaners the person riding it.
  

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Frankly
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Re: Rubinstein 4 knights Question
Reply #3 - 09/25/05 at 17:37:41
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Quote:
I have changed the original Dutch (not German, as Frankly assumes in his next post) in English notation.

.


Okay - I was wondering why 'Springer' was 'P' - I assumed Pferd. But do the Dutch say Paard? In Afrikaans the term is 'Ruiter'.
  
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Frankly
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Re: Rubinstein 4 knights Question
Reply #2 - 09/25/05 at 12:57:27
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Immense appreciation, MNb - I'll look through these carefully.

I notice with interest your second half of the game switch to German notation...
  
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MNb
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Re: Rubinstein 4 knights Question
Reply #1 - 09/25/05 at 12:22:45
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The gambit line 5.Bc4 Bc5 6.Nxe5 Qe7 7.Nf3 d5! is widely considered as good for Black. 8.Bxd5 Bg4 9.d3 c6 10.Bb3 Nd7 is Bernstein-Rubinstein, Vilnius 1912. This game ended in a draw after 11.Bg5 Qd6 12.Nb1 Qg6, but Black might try Ne5 too.
As Nf3 is pinned, White's castling will lose. The rest of the game:

13.Be3 Bxf3 14.gxf3 Qg2 15.Kd2 Nxf3+ 16.Kc1 Rd8 17.h3 Bxe3+ 18.fxe3 Nde5 19.Qf1 Qg5 20.Qe2 Nd4 21.Qd2 Ndf3 22.Qe2 Nd4 ½-½

I have changed the original Dutch (not German, as Frankly assumes in his next post) in English notation.

Another gambit option is 5...c6 6.Nxe5 d5.
Considering, that you play the Petrov, you might try 5... Nxf3+ 6.Qxf3 (6.gxf3!?) Bc5 instead. I think White is a little better here.
Maybe 5...d6 suits you best:
a) 6.h3 Be7 7.d3 c6 8.o-o o-o 9.Re1 b5!? 10.Bb3 a5 =.
b) 6.d3 Bg4 7.Be3 c6 8.Bxd4 exd4 9.Ne2 d5 =+.
c) 6.Ng5 Ne6 7.d4 Nxg5 8.Bxg5 Be7 9.o-o o-o 10.Qd3 Ng4!? about equal. Black should not worry about 9.dxe5 dxe5 10.Qxd8 Bxd8 11.o-o-o c6 either.

Giving up the Four Knights because of 5.Bc4 looks like a bad reason to me. You should either analyse that game or look for a 5th move alternative.
« Last Edit: 09/26/05 at 22:18:16 by MNb »  

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Frankly
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Rubinstein 4 knights Question
09/25/05 at 05:53:26
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Hello all

Apologies if this is covered in another thread - please direct me there if so.

Playing the Petroff to e4 often presents one with 4 knights, to which I then play Rubinstein's Nd4.

After Bc4, the idea is to push through with the gambit and play Bc5. After 6 Nxe5 Qe7 7Nf3, Fine wants one to go even further and chuck another pawn with 7...d5!

He says that 8Bxd5 Bg4 9d3 c6 10Bb3 Nd7 'takes advantage of the weak diagonal'. Fair enough. But at what cost! Is there profit in pursuing this? Generally with gambits, if you let go even slightly of the superior position, all you did was chuck a pawn (or two). Some wise words on this line would be appreciated, since I do like Rubinstein as the answer to 4 knights. Alternatively, I should abandon 4 knights if White wants to shift the Petroff into this line by playing Nc3.
  
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