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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) The Delchev/Semkov book (Read 114276 times)
zoo
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #193 - 02/02/09 at 04:43:35
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Hello,
Having had the opportunity to read this book cover to cover (thanks the french railway strikes), I would like to ask two minor questions :
1. In the English attack line 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.000 Bb4 9.Nf3, you say that 9...00 is playable (as well as usual 9...Ne5), but then consider that after 9.f3 Ne5 10.000, Black's simplest is 10...Ne5 transposing back to  the line you were trying to avoid ?!  perhaps it's just an editing question between version 1&2, but I would like to know your opinion if from White's point of view, he can just avoid the9...00-etc option by playing f3 before  000, even if you dismiss it as inaccurate since Ng4 is not a threat ?
2. In the queen sacrifice variation 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6.Nb5 Qb8 7.Be3 a6 Bb4 10.c3 Ba5 Nc7+ Qxc7, my page 175 of Safest Sicilian 2nd Edition book abruptly ends with "17.f5 00 18.g4", in the middle of unklär, and then come chapter 3 completes games section !?! Is a half page missing somewhere, or..?
  
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LeeRoth
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #192 - 02/02/09 at 04:13:43
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Dragan Glas wrote on 01/29/09 at 03:06:53:
. . . . In your 9...,d5 line, after 13. Rd1, I don't think 13...,Be6 is a good idea, as White has 14.Nd6+ winning the two bishops, and robbing Black of the right to castle - 14...,Bxd6 15.Rxd6, Rd8 . . .


In this line, I might try 15...Nb4.  Still seems equal to me, but I haven't looked that hard.
  
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zoo
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #191 - 02/02/09 at 03:54:03
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Hello,
Having had the opportunity to read this book coast to coast (tanks the french RStrires)
  
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Dragan Glas
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #190 - 01/29/09 at 03:06:53
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Greetings,

Bonsai
In your 9...,d5 line, after 13. Rd1, I don't think 13...,Be6 is a good idea, as White has 14.Nd6+ winning the two bishops, and robbing Black of the right to castle - 14...,Bxd6 15.Rxd6, Rd8 16.Rxd8+, Kxd8 17.a3 with 18.Be2 and 19.0-0, I think White has the better chances. Better may be 13..., Nb4 - threatening to go to c2 (whether capturing the pawn or not after 14. c3) with check, winning the Be3 and robbing White of castling rights. 14.Rd2, and only now 14...,Be6 as 15.Nd6+ fails after 15...,Bxd6 16.Rxd6, Nxc2+ as before. White could also try for the white-squared bishop (after 14...,Nb4) with 15.Nb6, Rb8 16.Nxc8, Rxc8 17.c3, Nxc2+ 18.Ke2, Nxe3; 19.Kxe3(/fe?!), Bc5(+) 20.Ke2, 0-0/Ke7 and 21..., Rfd8/Rhd8 contesting the d-file - but I think that if he loses the right to castle and with opposite-coloured bishops, things may be slightly better for Black. Yes, 13...,Nb4 does allow 14.Nxe5, but Black does get the pawn back with 14...,Nxc2+, etc.

Perhaps 13...,b5 first, putting the question to the knight may be better - to retain the e-pawn - and let White decide what he wants to do!? 14.Nd6+, Bxd6 15.Rxd6, Nb4?! 16.Rd2, Be6 17.c3, Nc6 doesn't really work for Black then - 15...,Nd4? 16.Bxd4, ed 17.Rxd4, Be6 and it's uncertain if Black gaining the d-file with ...,Ke7 and ...,R(either)d8 is enough to compensate for the pawn.

Personally, I'd be prepared to let the e-pawn drop, with 13...,Nb4, in exchange for the c-pawn to gain the bishop pair, the d-file and active piece-play

Also, in the bishop exchange line on e6 after 9...,Ng4, I think Black should play 12.Bc4, b5 - to encourage the exchange - 13.Bxe6, fe 14.Qg4 - and have 14...,Qf6 in answer, to preserve the right to castle short (after ...,Be7) with pressure on f2. Note that all Black's weak points are secured and White hasn't got c4 for either knight, at present - he'll have to weaken his queen-side pawns to contest it.

Kindest regards,

Dragan Glas
« Last Edit: 01/29/09 at 09:45:34 by Dragan Glas »  
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Bonsai
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #189 - 01/28/09 at 08:32:11
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LeeRoth wrote on 01/28/09 at 01:54:31:
9.Nd2 is a move.  My first instinct is indeed 9...d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nxd5 Qxd5 12.Nc4 and here 12..Qxd1 looks pretty equal. 9..Bg4 looks playable, but is certainly no refutation.  I think White keeps an edge after 10.f3 Be6 11.Nc4 Be7 12.Nb6 Rb8 13.Ncd5 or 11..d5 12.exd5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 Qxd5 14.Nxd5.  9..Be6 generally transposes to 7..Be6 8.Nd2 a6 9.Nc3 Be7 which is, I believe, covered by Rizzitano and maybe also Burgess.  Finally, I note that Rublevsky has tried 9..Ng4.  

Just some quick thoughts,
LeeRoth    

Looking at the line some more
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nb5 d6 6. Bf4 e5 7. Be3 a6 8. N5c3 Nf6 9. Nd2
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I think 9...d5 really looks like an easy equaliser 10. Nxd5 Nxd5 11. exd5 Qxd5 12. Nc4 Qxd1+ 13. Rxd1
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I was afraid that here white might have something, but it looks like black can neutralise any pressure white might have (as long as he doesn't abandon the d-file (e.g. by castling short) or some similar mistake). 13...Be6 14. c3 Rc8 15. Nb6 Rd8 16. Bc4 Bxc4 17. Nxc4 Rxd1+ 18. Kxd1 Be7 19. Kc2 b5 20. Nb6 f5 21. Nd5 Kf7.

Maybe Rublevsky was just trying to get some more interesting play, but 9... Ng4 looks indeed like it could highlight one obvious downside of not having played 9.Bg5. 10. Nd5 Nxe3 11. Nxe3 Be6 12. Bc4 Be7 13. Nf3 I am a bit puzzled by how to correctly evaluate 13. Bxe6 fxe6 14. Qg4 Kf7 15. O-O
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15...Bf6 16. Rad1 b5, it all seems rather messy and I'm not sure what to think of black's king's position... 13... Rc8 14. O-O O-O 15. Bb3 Nb8 16.Qe2 Nd7 17. Rfd1 Rc5 18. Nd5 Nb6
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This looks more complicatedly equal than the 9...d5 line.

The  9...Bg4 10.f3 Be6 11.Nc4 line looks very much like what whtie is looking for, indeed. But, here it might also be an option for white to play 10. Be2 Bxe2 11. Qxe2 d5 12. exd5 Nxd5 13. Nxd5 Qxd5 14.O-O trying to use the advantage in development.
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E.g. one could end up with a crazy line like 14...Be7 15. Qg4 h5 16. Qxg7 O-O-O 17. Qg3, whatever we are to make of that, I guess black has some clear compensation for the pawn.
  
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LeeRoth
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #188 - 01/28/09 at 01:54:31
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9.Nd2 is a move.  My first instinct is indeed 9...d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nxd5 Qxd5 12.Nc4 and here 12..Qxd1 looks pretty equal. 9..Bg4 looks playable, but is certainly no refutation.  I think White keeps an edge after 10.f3 Be6 11.Nc4 Be7 12.Nb6 Rb8 13.Ncd5 or 11..d5 12.exd5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 Qxd5 14.Nxd5.  9..Be6 generally transposes to 7..Be6 8.Nd2 a6 9.Nc3 Be7 which is, I believe, covered by Rizzitano and maybe also Burgess.  Finally, I note that Rublevsky has tried 9..Ng4. 

Just some quick thoughts,
LeeRoth    
  
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Bonsai
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #187 - 01/27/09 at 23:33:57
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On to a totally different line, I noticed that everyone (not just Delchev/Semkov, but also Rizzitano and Sommerbauer) ignore the move 9.Nd2 after 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.Bf4 e5 7.Be3 a6 8.N5c3 Nf6 9.Nd2. Of course you cannot cover every move and 9.Bg5 and later Nd2 is more than logical, but I don't actually see that the move is so illogical that the move isn't out of the question. After seeing it in a few internet games and discussing it in a post-mortem of a long time control game (where we played a different line), I have thus been wondering about this move and the move orders here. One of my opponents mentioned that it might be commented on by Fischer in his 50 memorable games (but perhaps he got the mover order mixed up).

I guess the problem with it is not 9...Bg4, is it? Here that looks less convincing (at least at first glance) to me than after 9.Bg5 Be7 10.Nd2, or is it that, again? I'm also not sure how good 9...d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nxd5 Qxd5 12.Nc4 is, here I see some point in the white bishop being on e3 (control over b6, although maybe additional control is not really needed?!).
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #186 - 01/12/09 at 11:48:00
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Papageno wrote on 01/08/09 at 08:14:15:
ddt, I'm not getting your point here, I'm afraid.
22...Kg8= leads to a draw or drawish endgame; while 22... Kg7? at least drops a pawn after 23. Rd3 Rg8 24. Rg3+ Kf8 25. Qxc5+ Kf7 26. Qh5+ Kf8 27. Qh6+ Ke7 28. Rg7+ Rxg7 29. Qxg7+ Ke8 30. Qxg2 etc. Maybe Black has some chances to miraculously save the game, it's a rook ending after all. But he is a clear pawn down.

I think Delchev & Semkov were absolutely right here with their comment.


Guess you are right. I thought that it was possible to avoid this by 26...Ke7, but missed that after 27.Qh7+ Kd6 28.Rd1+ there is no 28...Bd5 because of 29.Qxb7.

By the way, I am really glad somebody bothers to read and check my lines Smiley
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #185 - 01/10/09 at 22:49:01
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off topic question:
Mr. semkov, when will we see the announced book against 1.d4 - afaik a book about the vienna line or ragosin???!
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #184 - 01/08/09 at 08:14:15
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ddt, I'm not getting your point here, I'm afraid.
22...Kg8= leads to a draw or drawish endgame; while 22... Kg7? at least drops a pawn after 23. Rd3 Rg8 24. Rg3+ Kf8 25. Qxc5+ Kf7 26. Qh5+ Kf8 27. Qh6+ Ke7 28. Rg7+ Rxg7 29. Qxg7+ Ke8 30. Qxg2 etc. Maybe Black has some chances to miraculously save the game, it's a rook ending after all. But he is a clear pawn down.

I think Delchev & Semkov were absolutely right here with their comment.
« Last Edit: 01/08/09 at 09:19:46 by Papageno »  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #183 - 01/07/09 at 22:10:03
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Seems like I found a small error in the analysis in the book, though it is in the games analysis, not in the opening theory section. In the game Svidler-Yakovich, Maikop 1998, which went
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nxc6 bxc6 6. Bd3 d5 7. O-O Nf6 8. Qe2 Be7 9. Nd2 O-O 10. c4 Bb7 11. Rd1 Qc7 12. e5 Nd7 13. Nf3 c5 14. cxd5 Bxd5 15. Bf4 Qb7 16. Ng5 Bxg5 17. Bxg5 Nxe5 18. Qxe5 f6 19. Bxf6 gxf6 20. Qh5?!

Delchev & Semkov write: "White had the chance to "return the favour" and also use some tactics to level the game: 20.Qe2 Bg2 21.Bh7! Kh7 22.Qh5 Kg8= (22...Kg7?? 23.Rd3 +-)"

This is actually an update of Yakovich's old commentary, but it also contains a small error - after 22...Kg7 23.Rd3 Rg8! it is still a draw. White can win back the bishop, but there is no mate, so 22...Kg7 is also feasible.

Maybe the authors will update it in 3rd edition Wink The simplest solution would be just to drop the one-move variation in parentheses.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #182 - 01/05/09 at 13:29:12
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After doublechecking Polugajevski (Sportverlag Berlin 1982), I have to correct a typing error of mine. Sorry for this.

A1) Polugajevski gave 9. Na4 Bd6 10. Nb6 Bxh2+ 11. Kh1 Qxb6 12. Nxe6 (not 12. Nf5) Qxb2 13. Nxg7+ Kf8 14. Nf5 "with good prospects". Here 14. Bh6 should be even stronger according to engines.

Let us know whether you still prefer black after 12. Nxe6 and 14. Bh6. - Regards, papageno.

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #181 - 01/05/09 at 13:15:07
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"A1) 9. Na4 Bd6(?)
This is not a good square for the bishop. I think D/S give the strong 10. Nb6 here. (Only other recommendation at this point is the simple 10.g3 which is favored by Sommerbauer 2005 and also Stohl in his comments to Kramnik-Anand, Dortmund 2004). I have no doubt that we can trust Delchev here. If Rybka initially likes 10. Nb6 Bxh2+ here (BobbyDigital80) then please enter the moves 11. Kh1 Qxb6 12. Nf5 Qxb2 13. Nxg7+ Kf8 14. Bh6 and you will see how Rybka swings over and finally gives white advantage. This line is a really old one (e.g. Polugajewski 1982), so I think reading books might help more here than switching on Rybka."

I've had that position on Rybka 3 for 2 hours and 20 minutes and it's still saying black has a slight advantage with 14...Nxe4.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #180 - 01/05/09 at 11:16:13
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This is the line they give bs your B3 line.
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8.Be3 Bb4 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Bd6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Nxc8 Rxc8 13.Bxa6 Ra8 14.Bd3 Bxh2+ 15. Kh1 Bf4 =+
They don't give 12.g3. And there's no other analysis on this in the book.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #179 - 12/29/08 at 17:41:44
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In order to answer some of the questions BobbyDigital80 raised, I checked some book/CD and annotated games. The CD in question is the Chessbase product by Sommerbauer: Paulsen B40-B49 (from 2005), a product which is I really like as it covers most important lines and gives repertoire recommendations for both sides.

Unfortunately, I haven't read the Delchev/Semkov 2nd edition yet; the first edition is a book I already gave away (and I do not recall their recommendations from 1st edition in detail).

A) The correct move order 9. Na4(!) Be7(!):
This is clearly the best move order for both sides. I think D/S explain fairly well why black needs to play that way. For strategical explanation etc. I would also gice the advice to read and understand Delchev.

A1) 9. Na4 Bd6(?)
This is not a good square for the bishop. I think D/S give the strong 10. Nb6 here. (Only other recommendation at this point is the simple 10.g3 which is favored by Sommerbauer 2005 and also Stohl in his comments to Kramnik-Anand, Dortmund 2004). I have no doubt that we can trust Delchev here. If Rybka initially likes 10. Nb6 Bxh2+ here (BobbyDigital80) then please enter the moves 11. Kh1 Qxb6 12. Nf5 Qxb2 13. Nxg7+ Kf8 14. Bh6 and you will see how Rybka swings over and finally gives white advantage. This line is a really old one (e.g. Polugajewski 1982), so I think reading books might help more here than switching on Rybka.

A2) 9. Na4 Rb8(?):
As mentioned by Kowl, 10. c4 is strong. Sommerbauer agrees; he is mentioning among other games 10. c4 Nxe4 11. c5 d6 12. Bf3 with excellent white chances in Kovalev,A -Teske,H, 1996)

B) The wrong move order: 9. Nxc6 (?) bxc6 10. Na4
This must be worse since black gets some nice extra possibilities compared to line A). However, I'm not entirely sure how black best cashes in...

B1) 9. Nxc6 (?) bxc6 10. Na4 Be7 is for the lazybones. Black is back in the move order from A) starting 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6. Just mentioning this to show that white really shouldn't expect much.

B2) Sommerbauer 2005 and Polugajewski 1982 preferred 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Rb8 and then something like 11. c4 Bd6 12. g3 c5 13. Qd3 Bb7 14. Rad1 Be7 15. Nc3 d6 16. f4 O-O  (Tian, Kuan Kuan - Johansen, Darryl K, Astralia 2000, 0-1/43 Unless I'm mistaken, this is identical or very similar to Minic-Suetin, 1973.)

B3) I'm slightly in doubt about 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Bd6 (Delchev's choice?!) for the following reason: If white really can reach the position after 11. Nb6 (11. g3? is pointless from white's perspective becouse of 11...c5  as remarked earlier in this thread) 11... Rb8 12. g3 Be7 13. Nxc8 Qxc8 14. e5 Nd5 15. Bc1 then he plays the main line (compare to A: 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Nxc8 Qxc8 13. e5 Nd5 14. Bc1 by Delchev) with an extra move g2-g3. This doesn't look like a bad deal. The pawn on g3 covers h2 along the c7-h2 diagonal and kills counterplay down the g-file, for instance. Black might improve on move 12, however. Unfortunately I haven't had the chance to check Delchev/Semkov 2nd ed. here in detail.

What do you think of Delchevs book recommentation vs. line B3) ? Regards, papageno.







  
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