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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) The Delchev/Semkov book (Read 114280 times)
Gilchrist is a legend
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #208 - 02/14/12 at 19:53:16
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Obviously the main moves are 6. Be2 and 6. Be3 variations, but I was wondering if any improvements may have been found in addition to that new system with Re3.
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #207 - 02/14/12 at 12:40:05
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I have been working with this book, and I think that overall the suggestions have been holding up well. I know there are some holes in the coverage of 3. c3 (for example, Tiviakov has played an improvement for white). I'm not sure about the English Attack line, which I don't play as suggested by Delchev, and which probably is the most volatile.

I have not noticed any critical novelty in the Hedgehog-style line, the Nb5/Bf4-line, the fianchetto lines, or the classical.
However, against Be3/Bd3, after Nxd4 there is a rather interesting new setup for white, involving Qd2 and Re3. About the line with an early f2-f4, I don't know. It would be interesting to discuss the further developments.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #206 - 02/14/12 at 10:14:25
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Gilchrist is a legend wrote on 02/14/12 at 05:06:01:
How are the lines in this book doing theoretically now compared to its publication in 2008? I have had this book for two years now but have not had the time yet to read it.

Are you looking for an excuse NOT to read it finally?  Wink
  
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Gilchrist is a legend
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #205 - 02/14/12 at 05:06:01
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How are the lines in this book doing theoretically now compared to its publication in 2008? I have had this book for two years now but have not had the time yet to read it.
  

Creo lo que creo no importa lo que creen los demás.
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slates
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #204 - 06/09/09 at 18:56:17
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whitecraw wrote on 06/08/09 at 14:44:48:
Hi slates,

Just curious. Where did you order the second edition from? I've been looking online and having difficulty finding the latest edition.



Hi whitecraw - I bought my copy from Chess Direct, here in England. http://www.chessdirect.co.uk/

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #203 - 06/08/09 at 17:50:34
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whitecraw wrote on 06/08/09 at 14:44:48:
Hi slates,

Just curious. Where did you order the second edition from? I've been looking online and having difficulty finding the latest edition.



New In Chess and Niggemann are two places you can find it.
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #202 - 06/08/09 at 14:44:48
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Hi slates,

Just curious. Where did you order the second edition from? I've been looking online and having difficulty finding the latest edition.

  
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slates
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #201 - 04/18/09 at 17:18:35
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Thanks, Beetlejuice.  My curiosity got the better of me and I ordered the second edition a few days ago, so I'm looking at these lines now. Smiley
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #200 - 04/18/09 at 15:32:11
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slates wrote on 04/13/09 at 20:32:21:
In the second edition of the book is there much material on 7...Nc6 in the Alapin lines, could anyone tell me?  I had the first edition and Delchev/Semkov recommended 7...Nb6 after 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.c3 Nf6 4.e5 Nd5 5.d4 cxd4 6.cxd4 d6 7.Bc4.

I just took a look at the table of contents for the new edition and it seems that 7...Nc6!? (author's punctuation) may now be offered as an alternative as well as 7...Nb6, but is this analysed at all or just given a mention? 

I have Rogozenko's guide and he prefers 7...Nc6, but I wonder what views are offered in the 2nd edition of Safest Sicilian.

Thanks


There is about 1.5 page on 7.- Nc6 in the Step-by-step part in the 2nd edition.
  
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slates
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #199 - 04/13/09 at 20:32:21
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In the second edition of the book is there much material on 7...Nc6 in the Alapin lines, could anyone tell me?  I had the first edition and Delchev/Semkov recommended 7...Nb6 after 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.c3 Nf6 4.e5 Nd5 5.d4 cxd4 6.cxd4 d6 7.Bc4.

I just took a look at the table of contents for the new edition and it seems that 7...Nc6!? (author's punctuation) may now be offered as an alternative as well as 7...Nb6, but is this analysed at all or just given a mention? 

I have Rogozenko's guide and he prefers 7...Nc6, but I wonder what views are offered in the 2nd edition of Safest Sicilian.

Thanks
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #198 - 03/17/09 at 22:06:16
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kylemeister wrote on 03/17/09 at 19:08:36:
In the position you apparently mean, ECO gives 11...Qb8 (as in Geller-Andersson) as leading to a slight advantage for White; it thinks Geller's suggestion 11...Qf4 is unclear.


I really don't like the position after Qb8. After c4,c5 the black position is cramped and the freeing move d5 results into split pawns on a6 and c6. Perhaps Qf4 is the way, i'll give it a tray.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #197 - 03/17/09 at 19:08:36
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In the position you apparently mean, ECO gives 11...Qb8 (as in Geller-Andersson) as leading to a slight advantage for White; it thinks Geller's suggestion 11...Qf4 is unclear.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #196 - 03/17/09 at 18:32:52
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i mean:

e4 c5
Nf3 e6
d4 cxd
Nxd4 Nc6
Nc3 Qc7
Be2 a6
Be3 Nf6
0-0 Bb4
Na4 Be7
Bb6

There are only a few games in the database, but the results for white are quite good and the black pos looks no sooo good.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #195 - 03/16/09 at 13:40:51
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I really like this book. But i miss a line. I had this pos in a couple of local rapid chess tournaments and it seems that Patzer like me like the line. There are a few BigBoysGames too, but no recent.
In the main line after Nxc6 bxc they don't play Nb6, instead they opt for Bb6 with the idea e.g. Qb8 Bd4 ??? Nb6. Delchev doesn't mention it. What's the best answer for Black? I've tried Qe5 but wasn't really satisfied? Perhaps Qb8, Bd4 e5 and then Qc7?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #194 - 02/02/09 at 08:23:46
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Quote:
2. In the queen sacrifice variation 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6.Nb5 Qb8 7.Be3 a6 Bb4 10.c3 Ba5 Nc7+ Qxc7, my page 175 of Safest Sicilian 2nd Edition book abruptly ends with "17.f5 00 18.g4", in the middle of unklär, and then come chapter 3 completes games section !?! Is a half page missing somewhere, or..?  

I think there's a little paragraph missing. As opposed to the second edition, the first edition after "is unclear. 17.f5 0-0 18.g4" continues with some discussion on how white could prevent d7-d5 by 18.0-0 Ne7 19.c4, but that 19...Bb6 is supposed to be fine. The main line then continues with 18...d5 19.g5 dxe4 20.Bxe4 Nxe4 21.Qxe4 g6 assessed as +/-. I would say it's definitely a little editing mistake.

Interesting that this line was not updated, by the way, I think they did not bother to address the suggestion by Rizzitano that in the 16.e5 sub-line white might be slightly better by deviation on move 18... Well, it's not excactly a refutation and I don't loose any sleep over it, but it would have been logical to cross-check recent publications against their analyses.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #193 - 02/02/09 at 04:43:35
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Hello,
Having had the opportunity to read this book cover to cover (thanks the french railway strikes), I would like to ask two minor questions :
1. In the English attack line 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.000 Bb4 9.Nf3, you say that 9...00 is playable (as well as usual 9...Ne5), but then consider that after 9.f3 Ne5 10.000, Black's simplest is 10...Ne5 transposing back to  the line you were trying to avoid ?!  perhaps it's just an editing question between version 1&2, but I would like to know your opinion if from White's point of view, he can just avoid the9...00-etc option by playing f3 before  000, even if you dismiss it as inaccurate since Ng4 is not a threat ?
2. In the queen sacrifice variation 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6.Nb5 Qb8 7.Be3 a6 Bb4 10.c3 Ba5 Nc7+ Qxc7, my page 175 of Safest Sicilian 2nd Edition book abruptly ends with "17.f5 00 18.g4", in the middle of unklär, and then come chapter 3 completes games section !?! Is a half page missing somewhere, or..?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #192 - 02/02/09 at 04:13:43
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Dragan Glas wrote on 01/29/09 at 03:06:53:
. . . . In your 9...,d5 line, after 13. Rd1, I don't think 13...,Be6 is a good idea, as White has 14.Nd6+ winning the two bishops, and robbing Black of the right to castle - 14...,Bxd6 15.Rxd6, Rd8 . . .


In this line, I might try 15...Nb4.  Still seems equal to me, but I haven't looked that hard.
  
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zoo
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #191 - 02/02/09 at 03:54:03
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Hello,
Having had the opportunity to read this book coast to coast (tanks the french RStrires)
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #190 - 01/29/09 at 03:06:53
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Greetings,

Bonsai
In your 9...,d5 line, after 13. Rd1, I don't think 13...,Be6 is a good idea, as White has 14.Nd6+ winning the two bishops, and robbing Black of the right to castle - 14...,Bxd6 15.Rxd6, Rd8 16.Rxd8+, Kxd8 17.a3 with 18.Be2 and 19.0-0, I think White has the better chances. Better may be 13..., Nb4 - threatening to go to c2 (whether capturing the pawn or not after 14. c3) with check, winning the Be3 and robbing White of castling rights. 14.Rd2, and only now 14...,Be6 as 15.Nd6+ fails after 15...,Bxd6 16.Rxd6, Nxc2+ as before. White could also try for the white-squared bishop (after 14...,Nb4) with 15.Nb6, Rb8 16.Nxc8, Rxc8 17.c3, Nxc2+ 18.Ke2, Nxe3; 19.Kxe3(/fe?!), Bc5(+) 20.Ke2, 0-0/Ke7 and 21..., Rfd8/Rhd8 contesting the d-file - but I think that if he loses the right to castle and with opposite-coloured bishops, things may be slightly better for Black. Yes, 13...,Nb4 does allow 14.Nxe5, but Black does get the pawn back with 14...,Nxc2+, etc.

Perhaps 13...,b5 first, putting the question to the knight may be better - to retain the e-pawn - and let White decide what he wants to do!? 14.Nd6+, Bxd6 15.Rxd6, Nb4?! 16.Rd2, Be6 17.c3, Nc6 doesn't really work for Black then - 15...,Nd4? 16.Bxd4, ed 17.Rxd4, Be6 and it's uncertain if Black gaining the d-file with ...,Ke7 and ...,R(either)d8 is enough to compensate for the pawn.

Personally, I'd be prepared to let the e-pawn drop, with 13...,Nb4, in exchange for the c-pawn to gain the bishop pair, the d-file and active piece-play

Also, in the bishop exchange line on e6 after 9...,Ng4, I think Black should play 12.Bc4, b5 - to encourage the exchange - 13.Bxe6, fe 14.Qg4 - and have 14...,Qf6 in answer, to preserve the right to castle short (after ...,Be7) with pressure on f2. Note that all Black's weak points are secured and White hasn't got c4 for either knight, at present - he'll have to weaken his queen-side pawns to contest it.

Kindest regards,

Dragan Glas
« Last Edit: 01/29/09 at 09:45:34 by Dragan Glas »  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #189 - 01/28/09 at 08:32:11
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LeeRoth wrote on 01/28/09 at 01:54:31:
9.Nd2 is a move.  My first instinct is indeed 9...d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nxd5 Qxd5 12.Nc4 and here 12..Qxd1 looks pretty equal. 9..Bg4 looks playable, but is certainly no refutation.  I think White keeps an edge after 10.f3 Be6 11.Nc4 Be7 12.Nb6 Rb8 13.Ncd5 or 11..d5 12.exd5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 Qxd5 14.Nxd5.  9..Be6 generally transposes to 7..Be6 8.Nd2 a6 9.Nc3 Be7 which is, I believe, covered by Rizzitano and maybe also Burgess.  Finally, I note that Rublevsky has tried 9..Ng4.  

Just some quick thoughts,
LeeRoth    

Looking at the line some more
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nb5 d6 6. Bf4 e5 7. Be3 a6 8. N5c3 Nf6 9. Nd2
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I think 9...d5 really looks like an easy equaliser 10. Nxd5 Nxd5 11. exd5 Qxd5 12. Nc4 Qxd1+ 13. Rxd1
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I was afraid that here white might have something, but it looks like black can neutralise any pressure white might have (as long as he doesn't abandon the d-file (e.g. by castling short) or some similar mistake). 13...Be6 14. c3 Rc8 15. Nb6 Rd8 16. Bc4 Bxc4 17. Nxc4 Rxd1+ 18. Kxd1 Be7 19. Kc2 b5 20. Nb6 f5 21. Nd5 Kf7.

Maybe Rublevsky was just trying to get some more interesting play, but 9... Ng4 looks indeed like it could highlight one obvious downside of not having played 9.Bg5. 10. Nd5 Nxe3 11. Nxe3 Be6 12. Bc4 Be7 13. Nf3 I am a bit puzzled by how to correctly evaluate 13. Bxe6 fxe6 14. Qg4 Kf7 15. O-O
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15...Bf6 16. Rad1 b5, it all seems rather messy and I'm not sure what to think of black's king's position... 13... Rc8 14. O-O O-O 15. Bb3 Nb8 16.Qe2 Nd7 17. Rfd1 Rc5 18. Nd5 Nb6
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This looks more complicatedly equal than the 9...d5 line.

The  9...Bg4 10.f3 Be6 11.Nc4 line looks very much like what whtie is looking for, indeed. But, here it might also be an option for white to play 10. Be2 Bxe2 11. Qxe2 d5 12. exd5 Nxd5 13. Nxd5 Qxd5 14.O-O trying to use the advantage in development.
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E.g. one could end up with a crazy line like 14...Be7 15. Qg4 h5 16. Qxg7 O-O-O 17. Qg3, whatever we are to make of that, I guess black has some clear compensation for the pawn.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #188 - 01/28/09 at 01:54:31
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9.Nd2 is a move.  My first instinct is indeed 9...d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nxd5 Qxd5 12.Nc4 and here 12..Qxd1 looks pretty equal. 9..Bg4 looks playable, but is certainly no refutation.  I think White keeps an edge after 10.f3 Be6 11.Nc4 Be7 12.Nb6 Rb8 13.Ncd5 or 11..d5 12.exd5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 Qxd5 14.Nxd5.  9..Be6 generally transposes to 7..Be6 8.Nd2 a6 9.Nc3 Be7 which is, I believe, covered by Rizzitano and maybe also Burgess.  Finally, I note that Rublevsky has tried 9..Ng4. 

Just some quick thoughts,
LeeRoth    
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #187 - 01/27/09 at 23:33:57
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On to a totally different line, I noticed that everyone (not just Delchev/Semkov, but also Rizzitano and Sommerbauer) ignore the move 9.Nd2 after 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.Bf4 e5 7.Be3 a6 8.N5c3 Nf6 9.Nd2. Of course you cannot cover every move and 9.Bg5 and later Nd2 is more than logical, but I don't actually see that the move is so illogical that the move isn't out of the question. After seeing it in a few internet games and discussing it in a post-mortem of a long time control game (where we played a different line), I have thus been wondering about this move and the move orders here. One of my opponents mentioned that it might be commented on by Fischer in his 50 memorable games (but perhaps he got the mover order mixed up).

I guess the problem with it is not 9...Bg4, is it? Here that looks less convincing (at least at first glance) to me than after 9.Bg5 Be7 10.Nd2, or is it that, again? I'm also not sure how good 9...d5 10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Nxd5 Qxd5 12.Nc4 is, here I see some point in the white bishop being on e3 (control over b6, although maybe additional control is not really needed?!).
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #186 - 01/12/09 at 11:48:00
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Papageno wrote on 01/08/09 at 08:14:15:
ddt, I'm not getting your point here, I'm afraid.
22...Kg8= leads to a draw or drawish endgame; while 22... Kg7? at least drops a pawn after 23. Rd3 Rg8 24. Rg3+ Kf8 25. Qxc5+ Kf7 26. Qh5+ Kf8 27. Qh6+ Ke7 28. Rg7+ Rxg7 29. Qxg7+ Ke8 30. Qxg2 etc. Maybe Black has some chances to miraculously save the game, it's a rook ending after all. But he is a clear pawn down.

I think Delchev & Semkov were absolutely right here with their comment.


Guess you are right. I thought that it was possible to avoid this by 26...Ke7, but missed that after 27.Qh7+ Kd6 28.Rd1+ there is no 28...Bd5 because of 29.Qxb7.

By the way, I am really glad somebody bothers to read and check my lines Smiley
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #185 - 01/10/09 at 22:49:01
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off topic question:
Mr. semkov, when will we see the announced book against 1.d4 - afaik a book about the vienna line or ragosin???!
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #184 - 01/08/09 at 08:14:15
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ddt, I'm not getting your point here, I'm afraid.
22...Kg8= leads to a draw or drawish endgame; while 22... Kg7? at least drops a pawn after 23. Rd3 Rg8 24. Rg3+ Kf8 25. Qxc5+ Kf7 26. Qh5+ Kf8 27. Qh6+ Ke7 28. Rg7+ Rxg7 29. Qxg7+ Ke8 30. Qxg2 etc. Maybe Black has some chances to miraculously save the game, it's a rook ending after all. But he is a clear pawn down.

I think Delchev & Semkov were absolutely right here with their comment.
« Last Edit: 01/08/09 at 09:19:46 by Papageno »  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #183 - 01/07/09 at 22:10:03
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Seems like I found a small error in the analysis in the book, though it is in the games analysis, not in the opening theory section. In the game Svidler-Yakovich, Maikop 1998, which went
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nxc6 bxc6 6. Bd3 d5 7. O-O Nf6 8. Qe2 Be7 9. Nd2 O-O 10. c4 Bb7 11. Rd1 Qc7 12. e5 Nd7 13. Nf3 c5 14. cxd5 Bxd5 15. Bf4 Qb7 16. Ng5 Bxg5 17. Bxg5 Nxe5 18. Qxe5 f6 19. Bxf6 gxf6 20. Qh5?!

Delchev & Semkov write: "White had the chance to "return the favour" and also use some tactics to level the game: 20.Qe2 Bg2 21.Bh7! Kh7 22.Qh5 Kg8= (22...Kg7?? 23.Rd3 +-)"

This is actually an update of Yakovich's old commentary, but it also contains a small error - after 22...Kg7 23.Rd3 Rg8! it is still a draw. White can win back the bishop, but there is no mate, so 22...Kg7 is also feasible.

Maybe the authors will update it in 3rd edition Wink The simplest solution would be just to drop the one-move variation in parentheses.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #182 - 01/05/09 at 13:29:12
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After doublechecking Polugajevski (Sportverlag Berlin 1982), I have to correct a typing error of mine. Sorry for this.

A1) Polugajevski gave 9. Na4 Bd6 10. Nb6 Bxh2+ 11. Kh1 Qxb6 12. Nxe6 (not 12. Nf5) Qxb2 13. Nxg7+ Kf8 14. Nf5 "with good prospects". Here 14. Bh6 should be even stronger according to engines.

Let us know whether you still prefer black after 12. Nxe6 and 14. Bh6. - Regards, papageno.

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #181 - 01/05/09 at 13:15:07
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"A1) 9. Na4 Bd6(?)
This is not a good square for the bishop. I think D/S give the strong 10. Nb6 here. (Only other recommendation at this point is the simple 10.g3 which is favored by Sommerbauer 2005 and also Stohl in his comments to Kramnik-Anand, Dortmund 2004). I have no doubt that we can trust Delchev here. If Rybka initially likes 10. Nb6 Bxh2+ here (BobbyDigital80) then please enter the moves 11. Kh1 Qxb6 12. Nf5 Qxb2 13. Nxg7+ Kf8 14. Bh6 and you will see how Rybka swings over and finally gives white advantage. This line is a really old one (e.g. Polugajewski 1982), so I think reading books might help more here than switching on Rybka."

I've had that position on Rybka 3 for 2 hours and 20 minutes and it's still saying black has a slight advantage with 14...Nxe4.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #180 - 01/05/09 at 11:16:13
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This is the line they give bs your B3 line.
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8.Be3 Bb4 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Bd6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Nxc8 Rxc8 13.Bxa6 Ra8 14.Bd3 Bxh2+ 15. Kh1 Bf4 =+
They don't give 12.g3. And there's no other analysis on this in the book.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #179 - 12/29/08 at 17:41:44
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In order to answer some of the questions BobbyDigital80 raised, I checked some book/CD and annotated games. The CD in question is the Chessbase product by Sommerbauer: Paulsen B40-B49 (from 2005), a product which is I really like as it covers most important lines and gives repertoire recommendations for both sides.

Unfortunately, I haven't read the Delchev/Semkov 2nd edition yet; the first edition is a book I already gave away (and I do not recall their recommendations from 1st edition in detail).

A) The correct move order 9. Na4(!) Be7(!):
This is clearly the best move order for both sides. I think D/S explain fairly well why black needs to play that way. For strategical explanation etc. I would also gice the advice to read and understand Delchev.

A1) 9. Na4 Bd6(?)
This is not a good square for the bishop. I think D/S give the strong 10. Nb6 here. (Only other recommendation at this point is the simple 10.g3 which is favored by Sommerbauer 2005 and also Stohl in his comments to Kramnik-Anand, Dortmund 2004). I have no doubt that we can trust Delchev here. If Rybka initially likes 10. Nb6 Bxh2+ here (BobbyDigital80) then please enter the moves 11. Kh1 Qxb6 12. Nf5 Qxb2 13. Nxg7+ Kf8 14. Bh6 and you will see how Rybka swings over and finally gives white advantage. This line is a really old one (e.g. Polugajewski 1982), so I think reading books might help more here than switching on Rybka.

A2) 9. Na4 Rb8(?):
As mentioned by Kowl, 10. c4 is strong. Sommerbauer agrees; he is mentioning among other games 10. c4 Nxe4 11. c5 d6 12. Bf3 with excellent white chances in Kovalev,A -Teske,H, 1996)

B) The wrong move order: 9. Nxc6 (?) bxc6 10. Na4
This must be worse since black gets some nice extra possibilities compared to line A). However, I'm not entirely sure how black best cashes in...

B1) 9. Nxc6 (?) bxc6 10. Na4 Be7 is for the lazybones. Black is back in the move order from A) starting 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6. Just mentioning this to show that white really shouldn't expect much.

B2) Sommerbauer 2005 and Polugajewski 1982 preferred 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Rb8 and then something like 11. c4 Bd6 12. g3 c5 13. Qd3 Bb7 14. Rad1 Be7 15. Nc3 d6 16. f4 O-O  (Tian, Kuan Kuan - Johansen, Darryl K, Astralia 2000, 0-1/43 Unless I'm mistaken, this is identical or very similar to Minic-Suetin, 1973.)

B3) I'm slightly in doubt about 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Bd6 (Delchev's choice?!) for the following reason: If white really can reach the position after 11. Nb6 (11. g3? is pointless from white's perspective becouse of 11...c5  as remarked earlier in this thread) 11... Rb8 12. g3 Be7 13. Nxc8 Qxc8 14. e5 Nd5 15. Bc1 then he plays the main line (compare to A: 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Nxc8 Qxc8 13. e5 Nd5 14. Bc1 by Delchev) with an extra move g2-g3. This doesn't look like a bad deal. The pawn on g3 covers h2 along the c7-h2 diagonal and kills counterplay down the g-file, for instance. Black might improve on move 12, however. Unfortunately I haven't had the chance to check Delchev/Semkov 2nd ed. here in detail.

What do you think of Delchevs book recommentation vs. line B3) ? Regards, papageno.







  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #178 - 12/25/08 at 16:41:24
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BobbyDigital80 wrote on 12/25/08 at 12:38:05:
Kowl wrote on 12/24/08 at 10:51:54:
BobbyDigital80 wrote on 12/13/08 at 10:52:37:
Another line that I don't trust is on page 85 at the right in the middle.
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Bd6 11. Nb6 Rb8. First of all Rybka 3 says 11...Bxh2 is = and that after 11...Rb8, then 13.g3 and white is slightly better. They say 10...Bd6 is ! but Rybka 3 says 10...Rb8 is =. What's so good about the Bd6 move when white can stop the threat?

Also in the main line with 9.Na4, they say 9...Bd6 is bad because of 10.Nb6! But Ryka 3 says Nb6 isn't good for white there and it gives 10...Bxh2+ as slightly better for black.

I don't understands the intricacies of the difference between the 9.Na4 Bd6 and 9.Nxc6 bxc6 10.Na4 Bd6 lines.





if white play Nxc6 before Na4 he gives black the option os playing Bd6 rather than Be7. Black would prefer the bishop on d6 as it threatens to take on h2. It's just inacurate of white to allow black this choice.


How is it inaccurate? Bd6 in that line isn't good. If I was white I would probably play Nxc6 first and allow them their Bd6 move, and then play g3 and just have a better position probably.


after g3 black can follow up with maybe c5 and stop white getting at his former weakness. White is still fine in this position, it will just be a little harder to play from than the original plan of Nb6.

I guess if you're using Rybka to verify every variation you're not going to be happy with any of the book as most engines prefer white in every line of the taimanov.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #177 - 12/25/08 at 12:38:05
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Kowl wrote on 12/24/08 at 10:51:54:
BobbyDigital80 wrote on 12/13/08 at 10:52:37:
Another line that I don't trust is on page 85 at the right in the middle.
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Bd6 11. Nb6 Rb8. First of all Rybka 3 says 11...Bxh2 is = and that after 11...Rb8, then 13.g3 and white is slightly better. They say 10...Bd6 is ! but Rybka 3 says 10...Rb8 is =. What's so good about the Bd6 move when white can stop the threat?

Also in the main line with 9.Na4, they say 9...Bd6 is bad because of 10.Nb6! But Ryka 3 says Nb6 isn't good for white there and it gives 10...Bxh2+ as slightly better for black.

I don't understands the intricacies of the difference between the 9.Na4 Bd6 and 9.Nxc6 bxc6 10.Na4 Bd6 lines.





if white play Nxc6 before Na4 he gives black the option os playing Bd6 rather than Be7. Black would prefer the bishop on d6 as it threatens to take on h2. It's just inacurate of white to allow black this choice.


How is it inaccurate? Bd6 in that line isn't good. If I was white I would probably play Nxc6 first and allow them their Bd6 move, and then play g3 and just have a better position probably.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #176 - 12/24/08 at 10:51:54
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BobbyDigital80 wrote on 12/13/08 at 10:52:37:
Another line that I don't trust is on page 85 at the right in the middle.
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Bd6 11. Nb6 Rb8. First of all Rybka 3 says 11...Bxh2 is = and that after 11...Rb8, then 13.g3 and white is slightly better. They say 10...Bd6 is ! but Rybka 3 says 10...Rb8 is =. What's so good about the Bd6 move when white can stop the threat?

Also in the main line with 9.Na4, they say 9...Bd6 is bad because of 10.Nb6! But Ryka 3 says Nb6 isn't good for white there and it gives 10...Bxh2+ as slightly better for black.

I don't understands the intricacies of the difference between the 9.Na4 Bd6 and 9.Nxc6 bxc6 10.Na4 Bd6 lines.





if white play Nxc6 before Na4 he gives black the option os playing Bd6 rather than Be7. Black would prefer the bishop on d6 as it threatens to take on h2. It's just inacurate of white to allow black this choice.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #175 - 12/24/08 at 10:36:38
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BobbyDigital80 wrote on 12/24/08 at 02:21:43:
What about the other lines I gave? Their ...Bd6 line is no good.

The point is is you play Rb8 before Be7 white isnt forced to continue with the plan of playing Nb6 he can instead play c4 and play for a bind, which personally as a Taimanov player myself I dont enjoy facing half as much as the Nb6 lines.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #174 - 12/24/08 at 02:21:43
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What about the other lines I gave? Their ...Bd6 line is no good.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #173 - 12/14/08 at 23:19:43
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BobbyDigital80 wrote on 12/13/08 at 12:42:53:
One other suggestion. What's wrong with this line?
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Na4 Rb8
Rybka 3 says 9...Rb8 is = and that 9...Be7 gives white a slight advantage. Why rush the B to e7 right away? If Rb8 first, the B might be able to go to d6 depending on what white does.


If 9...Rb8?! white can play 10.c4 Bd6 11.g3 or f4 - good for white.
                                      10.c4 Be7 11.Nc3 - good for white
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #172 - 12/13/08 at 12:42:53
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One other suggestion. What's wrong with this line?
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Na4 Rb8
Rybka 3 says 9...Rb8 is = and that 9...Be7 gives white a slight advantage. Why rush the B to e7 right away? If Rb8 first, the B might be able to go to d6 depending on what white does.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #171 - 12/13/08 at 10:52:37
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Another line that I don't trust is on page 85 at the right in the middle.
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Bd6 11. Nb6 Rb8. First of all Rybka 3 says 11...Bxh2 is = and that after 11...Rb8, then 13.g3 and white is slightly better. They say 10...Bd6 is ! but Rybka 3 says 10...Rb8 is =. What's so good about the Bd6 move when white can stop the threat?

Also in the main line with 9.Na4, they say 9...Bd6 is bad because of 10.Nb6! But Ryka 3 says Nb6 isn't good for white there and it gives 10...Bxh2+ as slightly better for black.

I don't understands the intricacies of the difference between the 9.Na4 Bd6 and 9.Nxc6 bxc6 10.Na4 Bd6 lines.



  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #170 - 12/13/08 at 10:25:10
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On the top of page 85 on the left side, this line is given as equal.
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6.
Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Qd4 c5 11. Qc4 Bb7 12. Bf3 and now they give 12...Qe5 and 12...e5 as being equal. 12...Qe5 is equal but 12...e5 is horrible because it gives up the d5 square and Rybka 3 says white is +.95. Undecided

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #169 - 11/29/08 at 14:32:23
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IMRichardPalliser wrote on 11/27/08 at 09:33:37:
I'm still to see a copy of the second edition in England...strange! Sounds like it may well be worth the wait though Smiley


Hi Richard, I ordered mine from New in Chess last month. Almost finished it now. Smiley
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #168 - 11/27/08 at 22:13:03
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On the publisher's website there is a PDF excerpt with the author's foreword to the 2nd, which explains the changes.

http://www.chess-stars.com/graphics/eshop/books_special/The_Safest_Sicilian.pdf

(Sorry if this info has already been written somewhere earlier in the thread).
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #167 - 11/27/08 at 09:33:37
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I'm still to see a copy of the second edition in England...strange! Sounds like it may well be worth the wait though Smiley
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #166 - 11/26/08 at 13:22:53
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if you think of a serious e4 player he will make part3/4/5 (from white side) as his repertoire. so it's not surprising that all these systems (from black side) came under pressure. in 2nd edition all lines are fixed but what i think is even better is that he gives unexplored "sidelines" as backup. i find these lines easier to play and you do not risk getting outprepared. depending on your level (i never reach main lines in my games *g*) the 2nd edition is a must
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #165 - 11/25/08 at 21:04:27
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Some time ago I bought the 1st edition of this book and now I am scratching my head real hard trying to understand whether it makes sense for me to buy the 2nd edition - financial crisis and all Wink

Could anybody who read both the 1st and the 2nd edition of the book share his or her observations on the value of the purchase? Anything particular that stands out in 2nd edition and is completely missing in 1st?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #164 - 11/22/08 at 23:09:20
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Kowl wrote on 11/05/08 at 11:27:08:
I've ordered it from New In Chess. I'll let ya'll know how I get on Undecided


Hey Semko...

p.51 you missed a move:

"14.g5 Nfd7 15.f4 16.Na4"   - you forgot 15...b4

also

"(12.Bd4 13.Bc5 Bc5 14.Nc5 0-0=)" - you forgot 12...Nc6

(just thought I'd mention it ready for the 3rd edition) Wink
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #163 - 11/05/08 at 11:27:08
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I've ordered it from New In Chess. I'll let ya'll know how I get on Undecided
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #162 - 10/10/08 at 11:21:26
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IMRichardPalliser wrote on 10/10/08 at 10:02:25:
Semko - Are we still awaiting the second edition please?


It's available already. New In Chess and Niggemann have it.
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #161 - 10/10/08 at 10:02:25
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Semko - Are we still awaiting the second edition please?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #160 - 09/17/08 at 18:48:47
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for now it has to wait, since it will be used in tourn play (not by me) but with the help of a computer and much analytical work you can find what is going on. I was just giving a position where the book goes wrong.

But this book is simply amazing as all chess-stars books. I hope they made more (at the same quality) books

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #159 - 09/17/08 at 16:13:20
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can you give us the chessnotation?
  

The older, the better - over 2200 and still rising.
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #158 - 09/16/08 at 14:27:23
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First of all this book (as all other chess-stars books) is great.
Few mistakes , very well computer checked, and a very good start.

I am scrutinizing the book (first edition) with IDeA ( a new tool by chessok in aquarium, that builds trees of variations).

With some insight and a ton of hours (i am now in part 7) i have recorded about 15 major enhancements in Blacks play. But the number is very small compared to the enormous amount of information in that book.

for example in this position
http://www.france-echecs.com/diagramme/imgboard.phpfen=3rqrk1/1p3ppp/p1n2b2/2Q1p...

white is said to be clearly better, well in fact, white has a lot of trouble after Qd7! when both b5 is threatened and Qg4. The analysis goes to deep in the best variation for white and if white finds everything its about =+
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #157 - 08/23/08 at 16:04:45
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gewgaw wrote on 08/23/08 at 09:44:58:
hi all,

I´ve a prob with the following line:

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3
Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. Be3 Nf6 8. O-O Bb4 9. Bd3 Ne5 10. f4 Neg4 11. Bd2 Bc5 12. Nce2 e5 13. fxe5 Qxe5 14. Bf4 and white is better

I thought 9.Bd3 is dubious and indeed white`s play loooks a little bit clumsy, but he`s simply far better developed...what to do against 9. Bd3?!?!?



In your line, maybe 13..Nxe5 or 13..0-0 is better.  But in my notes I have 12..d6 when play might continue 13.h3 e5 14.c3 exd4 15.cxd4 Ba7 16.Be3 0-0 (or maybe 16..Qe7) 17.Qd2 Bxe2 18.Qxe2 Rae8 19.Qf3 Nxe4 20.Bxe4 Qe7 with equality.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #156 - 08/23/08 at 09:44:58
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hi all,

I´ve a prob with the following line:

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3
Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. Be3 Nf6 8. O-O Bb4 9. Bd3 Ne5 10. f4 Neg4 11. Bd2 Bc5 12. Nce2 e5 13. fxe5 Qxe5 14. Bf4 and white is better

I thought 9.Bd3 is dubious and indeed white`s play loooks a little bit clumsy, but he`s simply far better developed...what to do against 9. Bd3?!?!?

  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #155 - 08/16/08 at 09:07:12
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Hello,

Maybe, I am missing something but could not see the "dangerous variations line" 6Be3 a6 7.Be2 Nf6 8a3 in pdf?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #154 - 08/06/08 at 19:03:40
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Nolan Kordsmeier wrote on 08/06/08 at 18:26:30:
Does Anyone know when the second edition will be available for purchase??  I saw the info on chessstars website but it is not listed in items for sale so i was a little confused

Thanks


It's, the 2nd edition, already to buy at Niggemann Germany:
https://www.schachversand.de/scripts/QEStartSeite.idq?CiBookMark=N-1ee5560-7a2-1...
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #153 - 08/06/08 at 18:26:30
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Does Anyone know when the second edition will be available for purchase??  I saw the info on chessstars website but it is not listed in items for sale so i was a little confused

Thanks
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #152 - 08/02/08 at 21:44:09
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Well, I had to look hard to find this book last month (it seemed strange at the time that it was not even available at the chess stars web site), finally found it, paid top $ for it... and last week I saw that the 2nd edition is coming out any day now.   Cry

Live and learn.  Roll Eyes
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #151 - 07/23/08 at 14:09:45
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The index of variations at the end of the 2nd edition pdf sample is also interesting.

They cover the dangerous weapons: the sicilian suggestion also.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #150 - 07/23/08 at 11:21:32
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to 2nd edition:
why, why didn´t they analysed 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O Nf6 8.Be3 Bb4 9. Na4 Bd6!? I´m quite sure this moves deserves more attention.
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #149 - 07/23/08 at 06:06:09
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boki wrote on 07/17/08 at 07:21:44:
The 2nd Edition of this book is anounced for august this year. It will be interesting to know how much changed. unfortunatly I doubt there will be an uptade here like in the sharpest sicilian

It is apparently now in print and the introduction + table of contents is online on the http://www.chess-stars.com webpage (whatever that means in terms of actual availability).

Reading the introduction to the 2nd edition there's apparently major updates to the English attack (looking at the ToC that includes Khalifman's recommended line in the Anand series), the Paulsen main line, the Bd3 system, the f4 stuff and the c3 sicilian (Alapin).
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #148 - 07/17/08 at 20:38:31
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gewgaw wrote on 05/12/08 at 15:46:31:
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 7. Be2 Nf6 8. O-O Bb4 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Nxc8 Qxc8 13. Bd4 c5 14. Be5 Rb6 15. Qd3 d6 16. Bc3 O-O 17. b3 d5 18. e5 Ne4 19. Ba5 Rb5 20. Be1 Qc7 21. f4 c4 22. bxc4 Rc5 23. cxd5 exd5 24. c4 ...

I have also recently looked at this line and I thought that 19.Ba5 looked like a nice improved version of 19.Be1. Anyway, at the end of what I quote above, I think that 24.Rc1 looks pretty nice for white to me. White seems to simply have a nice space advantage with attacking chances on the kingside (and c2-c4 is in reserve). I'm not sure that black is really fine in this line.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #147 - 07/17/08 at 07:21:44
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The 2nd Edition of this book is anounced for august this year. It will be interesting to know how much changed. unfortunatly I doubt there will be an uptade here like in the sharpest sicilian
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #146 - 05/12/08 at 15:46:31
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When I play the taimanov, I have to play against the Be2/Be3- system in nearly every other game. At move 18 every player moves 18. ... Nd7, but what about ... Ne4!? I analysed it, of course with the help of Fritz, and it seems playable. Any opinions? Use strg + C and strg + V to copy and paste the lines.

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 7. Be2 Nf6 8. O-O Bb4 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Nxc8 Qxc8 13. Bd4 c5 14. Be5 Rb6 15. Qd3 d6 16. Bc3 O-O 17. b3 d5 18. e5
Ne4 $5 19. Ba5 (19. Be1 Qb8 20. f4 (20. f3 c4 21. Qd1 Nc5 $13) 20... g5 21.Bf3 f5 22. Bxe4 fxe4 23. Qg3 (23. Qh3 Rxf4 24. Rxf4 gxf4 25. Qg4+ Kh8 26. Qxf4 Qf8 27. Qd2) 23... d4 24. h4 h6 25. Qg4 (25. Ba5 Rb7 26. Rae1 e3 27. hxg5 hxg5 28. fxg5 Rd7 29. c4 (29. Rf6 Bxf6 30. gxf6+ Kh8 31. Qh3+ Rh7 32. Qxe6 Re8 33.Qd5 Qxe5) 29... Ra7) 25... Rf5 26. Ba5 Rb7 27. Rae1 e3 28. Qh5 Kg7 29. fxg5 hxg5 30. Rxf5 exf5 31. hxg5 Qh8 32. Qf3 Qh4 33. Rf1 Rb8 34. Be1 Qxg5 35. Qxf5
Qxf5 36. Rxf5 Kg6 37. Rf3 c4) 19... Rb5 20. Be1 Qc7 (20... f5 21. c4 dxc4 22.Qxc4 Rd8 23. Qc2 Rb8 24. Bc4 Rd4 25. f3 $18) 21. f4 (21. c4 Qxe5 22. cxb5 Qxa1 23. f3 c4 24. Qc2 Bc5+ 25. Kh1 Qxe1 26. Rxe1 Nf2+ 27. Kg1 Ng4+ 28. Kh1 Nf2+) 21... c4 22. bxc4 Rc5 23. cxd5 exd5 24. c4 Rxc4 25. Qxd5 Rd4 26. Qa5 (26. Qb3 Rb8 27. Qf3 Rb2 28. Bd3 Nd2 29. Bxd2 Rxd2 30. Be2 a5 31. a4 Qc5 32. Kh1 Qd5 33.Qxd5 Rxd5 34. Bb5 g5 35. fxg5 Rxe5 36. Bc4 Rd4 37. Bxf7+ Kg7 38. g3 Bxg5)
26... Qc2 27. Qxa6 Qb2 28. Bg3 Nc5 29. Rfb1 Qxb1+ 30. Rxb1 Nxa6 31. Bxa6 Ra8 32. Bf1 Rxa2

  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #145 - 04/15/08 at 13:40:51
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Hello MarinFan,
yes, I agree that maybe 11.Kb1 is more promising. But in my game I wanted to avoid this line.That is why I played 11.Qe1 also hopping to surprise my opponent but instead looks like I was surprised myself  Wink.
The game is still in progress, so I do not want to comment it. When we finish it I can share my thoughts.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #144 - 04/15/08 at 11:29:51
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Hello MilenPetrov,

A few weeks ago my coach showed me line 2) above, and also something against 16Qe2 and 16h3, so think it is good.
             At the moment, don't think 11Qe1 and the usual direct king-side attack is very promising for white, because black can bring this to a halt with f5 at some stage. So 11Kb1, discussed in another tread, trying to use black's queen-side pawn weakness's looks more dangerous.

Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #143 - 04/06/08 at 21:43:53
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"1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3
Qc7 6. Be2 Nf6 7. O-O a6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12.Nxc8 Qxc8 13. Bd4 c5 14. Be5 Rb6 15. b3 Nxe4 16. Bxg7 Rg8 17. Bb2 c4!
instead of Bf6 and Rd6; I can`t help but Rd6 looks strange to me;
17...Rd6 18. Bd3 c4 19. bxc4 Qc6 = according to S/D 20. g3 Ng5 21. f3 h5 22. Kh1!? [instead of Kg2] h4 23. gxh4 Nh3 24.Qe1 and it seems white can defend successfully and win the game.) "
Yes, you are right about 22Kh1! Sergei Soloviov pointed out this move to me about a year ago. If your idea proves good, it will be included in some future update of the Safest Sicilian with your authorship.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #142 - 04/03/08 at 09:59:27
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Hello,
first of all thanks to all for your efforts in this forum. A lot of interesting ideas appear here.
Now I want to share a small addiion to the Safest Sicilian book. Recently I am playing a corrspondence game in the following line in English Attack:
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd4 4.Nd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.0-0-0 Bb4 9.f3 Ne5 10.Nb3 b5 11.Qe1 Be7 12.f4 Ng6 13.e5 Ng4 14.Bd2 Bd7 15.Bd3 Rc8!
Here Semkov and Delchev mention 16.Ne4?!, 16.Qe2 and 16.h3.
After 16.Ne4 0-0 17.Kb1 f5! 18.ef6 Nf6 19.Rf1 in the corrections of the book only 19...Bd5 is mentioned. Here are my findings:
1) 19....Nd5 20.g3 b4 21.h4 a5 22.h5 Nh8 23.Ng5 (23.Nd4 Qb6 24.Nf3Nf7=+) 23...Bg5 24.fg5 Rf1 25.Qf1 a4 26.Nd4 a3 unclear;
2) 19....Ne4!N 20.Be4 21.Qe4 Qc4 22.Qc4 bc4 23.Nd4 Bc5 24.Ne2 (24.Nf3) 24...d5 and Black is fine (even slightly beter).
I am interested to hear your opinion about these lines.
In fact in the game I choose 16.Qe2 and the game is still in progress. When we pass the opening phase I will share the game with you.
Best Regards
Milen Petrov
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #141 - 02/11/08 at 10:48:29
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Hello,

Looks good as far as I could tell. At first thought white could get away with 19 f3 because if 19..Bc5+ 20Bd4 but black playing d5, causes some problems. (Sorry not proper variations, but at work and dont have sight of board).
                     In the other variation have not worked out difference with 22Kh1 instead of 22Kg2 yet.

Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #140 - 02/08/08 at 10:57:19
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Hi all,

during my holiday I reread the semkov/delchev book again and hopefully I found an interesting (and strong Wink ) novelty:
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3
Qc7 6. Be2 Nf6 7. O-O a6 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12.Nxc8 Qxc8 13. Bd4 c5 14. Be5 Rb6 15. b3 Nxe4 16. Bxg7 Rg8 17. Bb2 c4!
instead of Bf6 and Rd6; I can`t help but Rd6 looks strange to me;
17...Rd6 18. Bd3 c4 19. bxc4 Qc6 = according to S/D 20. g3 Ng5 21. f3 h5 22. Kh1!? [instead of Kg2] h4 23. gxh4 Nh3 24.Qe1 and it seems white can defend successfully and win the game.) With 17. ...c4 black sacrifies a pawn to activate his pieces for example:
18. Bxc4 Qc6 19. Qf3 Nd2 20. Qxc6 Rxc6 21. Bd3 Nxf1 22. Kxf1 f5 and black is slightly better.

Any opinions?





  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #139 - 01/17/07 at 08:09:05
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I will test the suggested lines in a CC tournament (WCCC semifinals). Out of the 6 games as black, 4 has started and all chose 1.e4. In one game we're already 10 moves into the english attack. Looking at previous games, I expect one opponent to play the Be2, 0-0, Kh1 line and another to play 2.c3, but then again, I'm not so good at predicting openings.

Maybe they all played 1.e4 because they saw my horrible play in the Najdorf.

Let's see what the other two players choose. Wouldn't it be strange if all play 1.e4?

Btw, I talked to an IM about the Taimanov. He called it 'The Najdorf for the lazy'.
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #138 - 12/21/06 at 19:29:38
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Quote:
Hello, I'm new here and I've just bought this book. I'd like to ask after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nb5 d6 6. c4 Nf6 7. N1c3 a6 why can't White simply reply 8. Nd4? it seems that any attempts to take advantage of its position is hopeless e.g. 8... Qb6 9. Be3 Qxb2 10. Na4 Qa3 11. Bc1 Qb4+ 12. Bd2 Qa3 with repetition. So it seems that 8. Nd4 is a decent reply instead of Na3 as mentioned in the book.


8.Nd4 is playable – but apart from the aesthetic problem of moving the knight right back to where it came from – it is unlikely to yield white any advantage. White has wasted two tempi to make black play a potentially useful ...d6 and ...a6.
After 8.Na3 (though this move is also not without drawbacks) white maintains some control over d5, making black's freeing ...d5 thrust more difficult to achieve.
After 8.Nd4, In contrast, black can simply play ...Be7, ...0-0 and ...d5 fully equalizing, or if black is reluctant to simplify he can play ...Bd7, ...Nxd4 and ...Bc6 with reasonable prospects.

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #137 - 12/21/06 at 19:27:48
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8.Nd4 is possible. It is mentioned in the books by Burgess and Rizzitano.

8...Be7 9.Be2 0-0 10.0-0 Bd7 11.Be3 Nxd4 12.Qxd4 Bc6 is the main line.
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #136 - 12/21/06 at 19:05:49
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Hello, I'm new here and I've just bought this book. I'd like to ask after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nb5 d6 6. c4 Nf6 7. N1c3 a6 why can't White simply reply 8. Nd4? it seems that any attempts to take advantage of its position is hopeless e.g. 8... Qb6 9. Be3 Qxb2 10. Na4 Qa3 11. Bc1 Qb4+ 12. Bd2 Qa3 with repetition. So it seems that 8. Nd4 is a decent reply instead of Na3 as mentioned in the book.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #135 - 09/21/06 at 10:30:40
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Hello,

I think you are right, would normally play BxN, to try and win d6 pawn, and/or get control of d5 for knights. F3 looks horrible, black would like to get Qb6, or maybe Bh4+ to provoke g3, to weaken f3,e4 in-directly.  Compared to lines where black plays immediate Be6, and pawn is on f2, black is considerably better, .i.e the 10...Be6 lines. Don't see an immediate wham-bam refutation of 11f3. though too.
                It turns out 11Be2 BxB 12 QxB d5 is not too great for white either, but this is non typical pointed line. Maybe didn't include 11f3 because it is clear not a great move at birth?, that and they have to draw line somewhere...

Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #134 - 09/20/06 at 05:27:57
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I've run into 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nb5 d6 6. Bf4 e5 7. Be3 Nf6 8. Bg5
a6 9. N5c3 Be7 10. Nd2 Bg4 11. f3
a couple of times. I assume there is a reason why into doesn't even merit a footnote in the book.
http://www.france-echecs.com/diagramme/imgboard.phpfen=rxxqkxxr%2Fxpxxbppp%2Fpxn...
Presumably it weakens the dark squares too much, particularly since Bxf6 is almost a given? Am I correct about that? Tactically the move is not immediately wrong, after all and white could really just play 11...Be6 12. Bxf6 Bxf6 13. Nc4...
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #133 - 08/14/06 at 08:16:03
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Thanks for the reply Semkov
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #132 - 08/11/06 at 20:15:06
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Answer to THE KING: I was on vacation, sorry for the delay.
The situation at top level is absolutely irrelevant to our choice of opening. It seems they all think that 1...e5 is the only correct answer to 1.e4 and they may be right. Even Delchev now is trying hard to master the Spanish.
Now about the Kan - I have never played that nor have we discussed it with Delchev. There were several Bulgarian GMs playing it regularly and since my youth I remember that everybody considered Bd3, 0-0, c4 as awkward for Black. My personal opinion is that a normal Maroczy Bind - without exchanged pieces or lost tempi like Nd4-b5-a3 - gives White a lasting edge. In fact any spatial advantage which cannot be compensated with concrete play is an edge in itself. The stronger the opponent - the more oppressing is to defend such positions in a tournament. No wonder nowadays Black prefers in the Sicilian variations with ...e5. I'm unable to provide concrete variations though. 
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #131 - 08/02/06 at 11:04:38
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Quote:
The reason I ask the above question is that I have always played the Kan, but recently bought Delchev and Semkov's book and was thinking of switching to the Taimanov.  In the introduction Delchev talks about the various problems with other Sicilians but doesn't mention the Kan.


I just switched from a Kan hybrid to the "Safest" Taimanov and I am very happy with it. I find the variations given "easy" to play. With the Kan I sometimes got in trouble against lower rated players, because of king-side attacks. Besides the Taimanov is also more active. The taimanov is and was also the choice of world class players and even world champions. The safest sicilian book made this switch quick and easy, and last but not least the variations given look very robust.

So as far as I am concerned, a very good book on a sound and active opening, what more can you want?

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #130 - 08/01/06 at 20:00:07
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What puts me off the Kan is 5.Bd3. If you prefer trench warfare to direct piece play, than the Kan should be your chioce over the Taimanov. A matter of taste.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #129 - 08/01/06 at 19:16:21
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The reason I ask the above question is that I have always played the Kan, but recently bought Delchev and Semkov's book and was thinking of switching to the Taimanov.  In the introduction Delchev talks about the various problems with other Sicilians but doesn't mention the Kan.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #128 - 08/01/06 at 13:22:58
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I would like to ask Semkov if he thinks the Taimanov variation in his book is a better choice than the Kan (1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6) and why?

Which is the more trusted weapon at the top level?

Thanks
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #127 - 07/01/06 at 19:32:58
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Thank you for the response, Semko; I'll have to look over your analysis and get back to you later!  It's very generous of you to respond to everyone's questions about the opening.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #126 - 06/29/06 at 18:17:07
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Today I saw the discussion about 13.c4. After only a brief look at the position, I must say that it seems very attractive for Black. The key point is that Black is very active! White saved us from the only problem  piece - the c8-bishop, and gave us a fantastic outpost on d5. As usual in this line, our primary concern should be how to activate the rook from b8. 15...0-0? may be good, but it contradicts this principle because after 16.Bf4 the rook should retreat to a8. What a shame! So the first move, which strikes, me is 15...a5. Perhaps it is best. Let ponder however over 15...Nd5!? In my opinion Black has an obvious initiative there. He should aim at doubling the rooks on the g-file or including the queen into play. The a6-pawn should be beyond our attention. Here are some variations:
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Be2 Nf6 8.0-0 Bb4 9.Na4 Be7 10.Nxc6 [10.Nb6 Rb8 11.Nxc6 bxc6 12.Nxc8 Qxc8 13.c4 Nxe4 14.Qd4 Nf6 15.c5  Nd5 (15...a5!? 16.a3 Nd5!) 16.Qxg7 Bf6 17.Qg3 (17.Qh6 Ke7 18.Rab1 Rb4 19.g3 Qg8 with initiative) 17...h5 18.Rad1 (18.Bxa6 h4)  18...h4!? (18...Rxb2 19.Rb1 h4 20.Qd6 (20.Qf3 Qb8) 20...Be7 21.Qe5 Bf6=) 19.Qf3 Ke7 20.b3 Qc7 21.Bc4 Be5 22.h3 Rbg8 23.Rfe1 Rg7with initiative.

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #125 - 06/20/06 at 15:31:49
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I don't know if it was deliberate or not, but I actually think my opponent's move order was very sneaky!  In the move order given by Delchev/Semkov, after 10.c4 Nxe4 11 Nxc6 bxc6 12 Qd4 Nf6 13 Nb6 Rb8, Black can play 14.Nxc8 Rxc8! because the pawn on a6 isn't hanging.  I think Burgess mentions this position, and he gives 14...Qxc8 a dubious mark (I think; I'm not at home to check the book).  The trouble is, this way Black can't play ...b6 right away.  So it looks like my opponent's move order has forced me into a dubious line (according to Burgess), unless I don't take the pawn on move 13.

Actually, what I played in the game:
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be2 a6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.Be3 Bb4 9.Na4 Be7 10.Nb6 Rb8 11.Nxc6 bc 12.Nxc8 Qxc8 13.c4 Nxe4 14.Qd4 Nf6 15.c5 0-0!? (this is a novelty according to Burgess) 16.Bf4 Ra8 17.Be5 Rd8 18.Rfd1 Ne8 is also probably fine for Black; I guess I was a little upset at not being able to "punish" White, and because I only drew against someone rated 150 points below me.

Fritz's suggestion of 15...Qb7 is cute in a "computer" kind of way.  In the game, I looked at 15...Qb7 but dismissed it due to 16.Bf4 Qxb2 17.Qd3!, when I couldn't find a satisfactory way for Black to continue.  Fritz suggests 17...e5, but a human doesn't play chess like this (at least I don't)!  Anyway, I'll have to look at 16...Qb4 instead of taking the b2-pawn.

Thank you for the help!
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #124 - 06/20/06 at 07:52:16
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Hello,

     Have looked again at 14 ...d5, and the line you gave, seems like you are right that white can cause problems there.
         What I did notice, when looking through Semko/Delchev book is that the 10c4 line can transpose to your game. In other  words after,

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be2 a6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.Be3 Bb4 9.Na4 Be7 10.c4, after 10Nb6 Rb8 is recommended by Delchev,
10 ... Nxe4 11 Nxc6, the other approach were could give the story of keeping more "bits on" with 11c5 is more common in high level games,
11 ... bxc6 12 Qd4 Nf6 13 Nb6 Rb8  when 14NxB QxB 15 c5 transposes to your game, whilst after 14 c5 d6 immediately is recommended. You could say that 14NxB is a typical lower rated novelty. Going to that effort to remove black's bad bishop does not look like an improvement. Anyway, it gives a clue that your play was fine up to move 15. Fritz suggests here 15... Qb7, so that if 16Bf4 Qb4. Then, one line is 16 Bd3 0.0 17 Qh4 Qxb2 18 Bxh7+ Nxh7 19 Qxe7 Nf6. The story now is white is not getting a bind, and struggling to find compensation for the pawn. It is amusing to look at the stories I put to bad moves earlier in the thread, suppose that's what weakies like me do. If the above, is at all close to the truth, then the conclusion is, your game continuation is an inferior version of the 10c4 pawn sac line.
    It is interesting to speculate if your opponent was deliberately tricky, with moves like 10Nb6, or got lucky with a shakey memory of the 10c4 line  Grin.
        At the same time at looking at this, had a quick look at 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Be2 Nf6 8.0-0 Bb4
9.Na4 Be7 10.Nxc6 bxc6 11.Nb6 Rb8 12.Nxc8 Qxc8 13.Bd4 0-0 from Anand v Polgar. Later in the game saw the eye catching advice of, keeping the queens on, and staying completely passive. How often do you see advice like that  Shocked. Not suprisingly the main recommendation is the more active 13 ...c5.

Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #123 - 06/19/06 at 19:42:52
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Sorry MarinFan, I appreciate your interest!  I also agree that it's hard to believe that 13...Nxe4 isn't the right move, but I don't trust 15...Nd5, and after 15...0-0 16.Bf4 Ra8 17.Be5 White has definite compensation (though the position is perhaps only equal).  I think my main problem has been searching for a "refutation"; since the position after 12...Qxc8 has been reached literally hundreds of times but White had never played the natural 13.c4, I assumed there must be something wrong with it (or at least have some recommended theoretical antidote somewhere). 

@Inn2, I had looked at 13...Qc7 a bit (I saw 14.Qc2? Qe5!), but never in conjunction with the "Taimanov" 14. Bd3 h5!?.  Thanks for the idea; I'll have to look at it a bit and see what I think.

In general I think there are a few ways for Black to remain pretty close to equal, but I don't see a way to "punish" White, which is what I was really hoping for...
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #122 - 06/19/06 at 11:00:32
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Umm, thought I was showing some interest, and had made similar comments about  15... Nd5, and 10Nb6 before you.
                  I could have put more analysis with 14... d5, but was making a judgement, that black was keeping the white square bishop under control, so looks the way for black to go.
                 Hard to believe that 13 ... Nxe4 isn't the right move. In the similar, 10 c4 line, in the first high level game Larsen v Karpov, Karpov avoided 10... Nxe4, but that looked like a typical safety-first reaction from him on seeing a novelty.(The Delchev book covers 10... Nxe4).
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #121 - 06/19/06 at 02:08:18
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13. c4 is interesting, if White refrains from 13. e5 or 13. Bd4 (intending e5), a suitable punishment is 13... Qc7, preventing e5 from ever occuring (14. Bd4 e5), and still maintainng the threat to take either b2 or e4 pawn. I also like the look of the typical Taimanov move 13... Qc7 14. Bd3 h5!?

More worrying is the early pawn sac 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be2 a6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.Be3 Bb4 9.Na4 Be7 10 c4!? which i thought was rather dangeours a few years ago, perhaps this was dealt with adequately in Delchev/Semkov book?!
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #120 - 06/18/06 at 22:36:43
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Hello guys; it kind of seems like I'm the only one interested in this line, but I'll share what I've looked at so far...

I no longer think 15...Nd5 is an improvement for Black, due to 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be2 a6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.Be3 Bb4 9.Na4 Be7 10.Nb6 Rb8 11.Nxc6 bc 12.Nxc8 Qxc8 13.c4!? Nxe4 14.Qd4 Nf6 15.c5 Nd5 16.Qxg7 Bf6 17.Qh6 Rxb2 18.Bc4 Qd8 19.Rab1! White looks better.

I'm now starting to question taking the pawn right away, and think maybe something simple like 13...d6 (still threatening both the e4 and b2 pawns) is the right move.  Still, doesn't White look better with those nice Bishops and no weaknesses after something like 14.Qc2?

I must admit that I thought more people would be interested in this line, given the popularity of the Delchev/Semkov book.  This novelty (13.c4!?) strikes right at the heart of the repertoire!  Even if it isn't anything to worry about theoretically, I thought there would be more players who want to know the best lines for Black!?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #119 - 06/16/06 at 16:56:27
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@MarinFan:
After 14....d5 there are a few options for White instead of exchanging queens.  For instance, how about the straightforward:

13.c4 Nxe4 14.Qd4 d5 15.Qxg7! Bf6 16.Qh6 Bxb2 [if 16...Rxb2 17.Bd3! and White seems to have more than enough compensation]. Now perhaps 17.Rae1!?, to avoid ...Nc3.  Anyhow, Black has a pawn, but White has the two Bishops and Black has lots of dark-squared K-side weaknesses.  I'm not sure who is better, but White definitely has compensation (and this is not something I would really want to play as Black OTB without first doing some homework).

I actually hope that some of the stronger (i.e. titled) players could take a look at this; Black's best line of play is not at all clear to me.



  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #118 - 06/16/06 at 16:30:48
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I liked the Be2 chapter as well, that is probably because I am very much used to the french-type positions (after a later d5)
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #117 - 06/16/06 at 14:38:29
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Well, think you will have phleasant reading. The English attack chapter is one of the strongest one in the book, orginally thought both sides play was very strange, but black's side almost seems natural now. It is probably so good, because the line very trendy at the moment.
        The other particularly strong chapter is about the hedgehog set-up after Nb5. Delchev comes across as someone who is a bit of a Karpov fan. Will probably follow the Karpov model, and put sicillian in mothballs, if makes elite level.
              Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #116 - 06/16/06 at 14:20:29
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hello MarinFan, didn't really like the 8... Bb4 9. Na4 Be7 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Nb6 Rb8 12. Nxc8 stuff for Black (difficult to win against White's two bishops), so prefer transposing to scheveningen 8... d6, but Black's life there is not a picnic either (probably need to find a good book). I also think the English Attack is not so harmless against the Taimanov, at least i'm no longer 100% certain the Taimanov is safer than the Najdorf/Scheveningen against the English Attack. Somehow after White plays Nb3/ Kb1/Bd4 Black makes all the useful moves he can... and then its White who starts the attack! i last looked at these lines with IM Sommerbauer's Chessbase CD, and I haven't started reading the Delchev/Semkov book yet (it was delivered to my home, and i'm far away from home at the moment), but will be very interested to see how they make these lines work for Black.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #115 - 06/16/06 at 13:52:35
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After 15 ...Nd5 16 Qxp Bf6 17 Qg3 Rxb2 18 Rb1 white even could have an edge. White square bishop is strong, and a6-pawn weak.
              Thought  14 ...d5 looked more promising. After 15 pxp c6 xd5 16 Qa4+ Qd7 18 Qxp thought black had strong central position, and likely to pickup a or b pawn.
                  Interested to know what people thought was the most dangerous line for white. My vote would go for the old main line with Bd3, Be3 and h3 of, for example, Fressinet game above. Don't think my "analysis" was very convincing there, and black's position is no picnic, with a Bb7 approach either.
Interesting in Delchev book didn't mention that Tal was a hero of this opening, suppose doesn't fit the safest sicillian image. Against Bd3, Be3 he choosed mostly to hover off peices with NxN, followed by Bc5, which doesn't exact fit his sterotype either. Would be a shame, if black had to adopt that approach.
              Another line have had problems with in the past is g3, followed by queen-side bind with a4,a5. Maybe white does not really have much there, but it is quite uncomfortable for black having no counterplay.
          Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #114 - 06/14/06 at 17:00:08
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Yes Alumbrado, that is the right move order.  In my database there are 2 games where 2400+ players played this way with White, and in both games the 2400+ player with Black played 10...Rb8.  In the game, my opponent played up until 10.Nb6 instantly, and I thought for about 5 minutes about taking the knight, then made the practical decision to decline.  I think White gets too much compensation after 10...Qxb6 11.Nxe6 Qa5 12.Nxg7+; there may be a defence for Black here, but in practice this is not something I would want to go into (at least not without having analyzed it extensively beforehand).

@MarinFan, I'm surprised 13.c4 has never been played.  Perhaps it's an inferior move, but it looks like a fairly natural pawn sacrifice.  I'm not afraid of it though; I just wonder what the best line for Black is after this.  I'll do some analysis in the next few days, but I'm leaning towards 15...Nd5 as the improvement for Black.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #113 - 06/14/06 at 16:21:52
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Hello,

10Nb6 is maybe not as bad as it looks, because if 10 ... QxB 11Nxe6 followed by Ng7+. Still, is hard to believe really, if even if players like Pia Cramling avoid this altogther with 10... Rb8 too.
                    After 13 c4, even though looks like a blunder, don't see any better than the options already mentioned, and white gets a suprising about of counter-play. This line with 13 e5 or 13 Bd4 looks like one of white's better tries.

Bye John S

p.s with games scores just cut and paste from pgn files available at TWIC or ChessBase.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #112 - 06/14/06 at 08:16:13
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Is that move order right?  I mean 10.Nb6?
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #111 - 06/13/06 at 16:51:31
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Sorry about that last post, I thought the attachment would show up as text!  How do you guys (like MarinFan) paste those nice game scores into the message??

Anyway the moves in question are:
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be2 a6 7.0-0 Nf6 8.Be3 Bb4 9.Na4 Be7 10.Nb6 Rb8 11.Nxc6 bc 12.Nxc8 Qxc8 13.c4?! Nxe4 (I assume this is best) 14.Qd4 Nf6 (...d5 looked too risky in the game to me) 15.c5 0-0 (perhaps I can improve here with 15...Nd5 16.Qxg7 Bf6?) 16.Bf4 Ra8 17.Be5 and we eventually drew after some ups and downs.

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #110 - 06/13/06 at 16:43:07
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After studying this book for a while, I played my first tournament game with it.  It went like this:

I eventually only drew, despite the rating difference between myself and my opponent.  However, I was curious about how to react to White's 13. c4.  I figured that I had to take the e-pawn, as White is threatening to advance it to e5 now.  White got compensation after I castled, however; perhaps I missed a chance to play 15...Nd5!? 16.Qxg7 Bf6.  I'm surprised that I couldn't find a single game with 13.c4 in my database, so I was wondering what the "refutation" is.  Thanks!
  

taimanov.pgn ( 0 KB | 102 Downloads )
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #109 - 06/13/06 at 16:26:58
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Interesting Semko!

Regarding an earlier comment in this thread Quote:
Later looks like a smooth win for white, but Fritz thinks black can turn tables with 27...Ng3+. Must be irratating for players nowdays, when any twit with a computer can point out an error, which ruins a nice game.


What people must also remember is that the FIDE olympiad is played at the crazy FIDE time control which leads to rapid deterioration in standard of play as the game goes on.....dont be too quick to blame these guys even GM´s make bad mistakes at this time limit
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #108 - 06/03/06 at 22:09:47
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Today Anand has done exactly what I said you should not do with Black in the Hedgehog... (...g5) and lost because of the breakthrough c4-c5 - as I warned. Obviously he read the wrong book...So far in Turin they all confirm our negative evaluations. But is there a guy who would try our suggestions?!
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #107 - 06/02/06 at 21:50:48
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Both victims in the Turin examples did not follow our advices! I suppose that they did not even read the book as top GMs seldom read other's books. About Kiril Georgiev - I'm sure he read it. I saw off our team to the airport with a couple of them. Kiril is our new author so he must have studied The Safe Sicilian in order to follow the same style in The sharpest Sicilian.
About Fressinet - Rublevsky. I wrote in bold that instead of 12...Bd7 Black should play 12...0-0 and pointed out that the bishop should control d5 so it must be developed to b7.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #106 - 05/31/06 at 11:08:33
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Hello,

Another recent example of 11. Kb1 Be7 not being a good idea, is
[Event "37th Olympiad"]
[Site "Turin ITA"]
[Date "2006.05.28"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Georgiev,Ki"]
[Black "Almasi,Z"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2677"]
[BlackElo "2657"]
[EventDate "2006.05.21"]
[ECO "B48"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 7. Qd2 Nf6
8. O-O-O Bb4 9. f3 Ne5 10. Nb3 b5 11. Kb1 Be7 12. Qf2 d6 13. Bb6 Qb8 14.
Bd4 O-O 15. g4 Bb7 16. g5 Nfd7 17. Rg1 b4 18. Ne2 a5 19. f4 a4 20. Nd2 Nc6
21. Be3 b3 22. cxb3 axb3 23. a3 Rc8 24. Nc3 Bf8 25. Bb5 Nc5 26. Rg3 Nd8 27.
Qe2 g6 28. f5 exf5 29. exf5 Qc7 30. Bd4 Nc6 31. Bf6 Re8 32. Qc4 Qd7 33.
fxg6 Qf5+ 34. Ka1 Qxg6 35. Nxb3 d5 36. Nxd5 Re4 37. Qc1 Nxb3+ 38. Rxb3 Na5
39. Rc3 Qf5 40. Nc7 Rb8 41. Bd3 Rc8 42. Qc2 Qg4 43. Rc1 Rb8 44. b4 Bxb4 45.
axb4 Bc6 46. Bxe4 Bxe4 47. Qa4 1-0

You would think this book would be required reading, when playing against the Bulgarian team. Its a shame didn't see what white had in mind against 11...Nc4 followed by a later Rb8.

Next game interesting too.
[Event "37th Olympiad"]
[Site "Turin ITA"]
[Date "2006.05.30"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Fressinet,L"]
[Black "Rublevsky,S"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2633"]
[BlackElo "2687"]
[EventDate "2006.05.21"]
[ECO "B48"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. Nc3 a6 4. d4 cxd4 5. Nxd4 Nc6 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Bd3 Qc7
8. O-O Ne5 9. h3 Bc5 10. Kh1 d6 11. f4 Ng6 12. Qe1 Bd7 13. f5 Ne5 14. Nce2
Qb6 15. Qg3 O-O 16. Qh4 Rfe8 17. b4 Qxb4 18. Rab1 Qa4 19. fxe6 fxe6 20.
Rxb7 Rab8 21. Rxb8 Rxb8 22. Qg3 Rf8 23. Nxe6 Bxe6 24. Bxc5 Nxd3 25. Bxd6
Rf7 26. Qxd3 Nxe4 27. Nd4 Rxf1+ 28. Qxf1 Bf7 29. Be5 Bxa2 30. Qf4 Bd5 31.
Bxg7 Kxg7 32. Qe5+ Nf6 33. Nf5+ Kf7 34. Nd6+ Kg6 35. Qf5+ Kg7 36. Qg5+ 1-0

16Qh4 TN is a funny one, is white trying to show black is in Zugzwang?! When first looked at game, thought dropped a peice to 16 ...NxB 17 p xN e5 but white has strong attacking chances after 18Bg5. Then looked at 16 ...pxf5 17 e xf5 Rf-e8 with the idea of if 19 Bg5 Nf-g4, and playing Ne5x d3 later. This kind of thing looks ok for black, when a knight can't come quickly to d5. Later looks like a smooth win for white, but Fritz thinks black can turn tables with 27...Ng3+. Must be irratating for players nowdays, when any twit with a computer can point out an error, which ruins a nice game.

Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #105 - 05/29/06 at 08:05:28
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Semkov
Thank you very much for the quick replies. All my questions are answered.  Smiley Cheesy
And I finally understnad why Kb1 is played.  Cool
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #104 - 05/28/06 at 20:03:59
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I repeat here the announce which I posted in another thread:
In the reprinted version of the book there are a number of corrected omissions and just a few changes in the chess content.
Everyone can download the most important corrections from:
http://chess-stars.com/corrections.pdf
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #103 - 05/28/06 at 19:58:58
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SniperOnG7, To your other question you answered yourself: "Obviously the loss of tempo is the reason" Yes, indeed. One tempo is a sound reason to change plans in such a sharp system as The English attack. In your example White's king is still on c1. On that square the king is vulnerable to different tactical hits, especially after a pawn storm by the b and a pawns. Another reason not to play Bb6 is because the bishop is already activated on d4 and it is pointless to move it again.
  
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Comparison
Reply #102 - 05/28/06 at 19:40:08
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After 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.g3 a6 7.Bg2 d6 8.0-0 Bd7 9.Re1 Be7 10.Nb3 b5 11.a3 Nf6 12.f4 both moves Rc8 and Rd8 are playable. The difference between them is in the way Black meets g4.
1. In the case of 12...Rd8 13.Be3 0-0 14.g4 Black can play 14...Bc8 freeing d7 for the knight.
2. After 12...Rc8 13.Be3 0-0 is dubious because after 14.g4 the knight has no good retreat square. So in the second case Black should try to build a blockade on the dark squares starting with 13...h6 14.g4 Nh7 (14...h5 15.h3 hxg4 16.hxg4 g5 17.e5+=) Then White could persist with his plan with 15.Bf2 aiming for h4 and g5.
Perhaps the word "renews" the threat g4 is not precise. My idea was to say that White is threatening g4. Since the same idea was discussed on the previous move (but it was not good with the bishop still on c1), I used "renews". Sorry if I was unclear.

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #101 - 05/27/06 at 05:27:42
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I have another comparison question...
Why is it in line D 9.Re1 (starts from pg147) after 13...Rd8, 14.g4 is not good for white while after 14.Be3, the g4 threat is "renewed" again?

Help with my two questions will be much appreciated!
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #100 - 05/26/06 at 19:21:28
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Interestingly, a certain IM (about 2400 fide) played 13.Be2!? against me in a rapid game on ICC a few weeks ago. He played it immediately, as if he prepared the move. I replied with what I believe is the best continuation (as was suggested by Semkov above). the game went:

[Event "ICC 10 30"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2006.5.7"]
[Round ""]
[White "International Master"]
[Black "Ptero"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[Eco "B44"]
[Annotator ""]
[Source ""]

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.Bf4 e5 7.Be3
a6 8.N5c3 Nf6 9.Bc4 Be6 10.Nd5 Nxe4 11.Bb6 Qg5 12.Nc7+ Kd7 13.Be2
Rc8 14.Nxe6 fxe6 15.O-O Nd4 16.Bxd4 exd4 17.Qxd4 d5 18.Nc3 Rxc3
19.bxc3 Bc5 20.Qa4+ Ke7 21.Bf3 Nd2 22.Qg4 Qxg4 23.Bxg4 Nxf1 24.Kxf1
Rf8 25.f3 Kd6 26.g3 h5 27.Bxh5 Rh8 28.g4 g6 29.Bxg6 Rxh2 30.Rd1
Rf2+ 31.Ke1 Rxf3 32.c4 Rg3 33.cxd5 Rg1+ 34.Ke2 Rxd1 35.Kxd1 {Game drawn by mutual agreement}
1/2-1/2

17.Bf3 is probably better than the move played, while 20...Kd6!? may have given black some edge. In any case I am rather convinced that black should be doing well against 13.Be2

Ptero
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #99 - 05/26/06 at 17:22:29
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Ptero,

Actually, Black is not looking for an evasive draw at all.  Black plays

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6. Bf4 e5 7. Be3 a6 8. N5c3 Nf6 9. Bc4 Be6 10. Nd5 Nxe4 11. Bb6 Qg5 12.Nc7+ Kd7 13. Be2 Nd4 14. O-O Bh3 15. Bf3 Nxf3+ 16. Qxf3 Qxg2+ 17. Qxg2 Bxg2 18.
Kxg2 Rc8 19. Nd5

19...   Rxc2

And he has 3 pawns for the Knight and his pawns are very mobile ones.  I think Black is in the race as much as White is--  

here is a line and not necessarily best or only play from both sides--

20. Nbc3 Nf6 21. Rab1 Nxd5 22. Nxd5 Be7 23. Ne3 Rc6
24.Ba5 Bg5 25. Bc3 Ke6 26. Rfe1 Bxe3 27. Rxe3 g5 28. Rd1 f5 29. Rh3 h5

Those pawns are very mobile, united, and make their presence felt in White's face.

And Black also looks good in

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5.
Nb5 d6 6. Bf4 e5 7. Be3 a6 8. N5c3 Nf6 9. Bc4 Be6 10. Nd5 Nxe4 11. Bb6 Qg5 12.
Nc7+ Kd7 13. Be2

13... Rc8 14. Nxe6 fxe6 15. O-O Be7 16. c3 Qh6 17. Bd3 Nf6
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #98 - 05/26/06 at 05:22:42
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YEAH! I finally got the book! The format was revolutionary and congrats to Mr. Semkov and Mr. Delchev.
Right now I am studying the English Attack section and I've got a question...

The 11. Bd4 line contines with 11...Be7
12 Qf2 d6

While in 11.Kh1, the authors warn not to play 11...Be7 due to
12 Qf2 d6
13 Bb6!

My question is, if Bb6 is such a strong move, why isn't it discussed in the former line? Obviously the loss of tempo is the reason...but why? Black will still have to reply with 13...Qb8 doesn't he?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #97 - 04/03/06 at 16:39:11
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Ptero, I assessed the position after 15...Be7 like promising for Black without calculating a lot of variations. In fact I considered only 16.c3 Qh6 17.Bd3 Nf6 that you do not mention. Perhaps you should check it too. But finally we cannot (and should not) find everything at home. Sometimes it is fun to experiment OTB. You only have to pick a line to your taste and play it. Computer's evaluation is not too important in terms of practical results. Delchev, for instance, gladly plays all kinds of Sicilian endgames and keeps winning a lot of them although chips say that Black is very bad. If you feel happy in some line and it yields points, switch off the engine and do not pay attention to it.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #96 - 04/03/06 at 12:22:21
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To Mr. Semkov and BladezII, thanks for your thoughtful responses.

To Mr. Semkov:
First, let me congratulate you and Mr. Delchev for this book, which I think is excellent both in concept and in content. Great work!
Second, about the specific variation I was discussing:
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.Bf4 e5 7.Be3 a6 8.N5c3 Nf6 9.Bc4 Be6 10.Nd5 Nxe4 11.Bb6 Qg5 12.Nc7+ Kd7 13.Be2
And now, after:
13…Rc8 14.Nxe6 fxe6 15.O-O Be7 Black’s position indeed looks great at first sight, but White plays 16.c3! intending Qb3 eyeing both b7 and e6. Black’s game seems rather unpleasant, for example: 16…Rcf8 (clearing c8 for the K) 17.Be3 Qf6 (17…Qg6 or 17…Qf5 fails to 18.Bd3, while after 17…Qh4 just 18.Qb3 +/-) 18.Bd3 Ng5
19.Qb3 Kc8 20.Bxg5 Qxg5 21.Qxe6+ Kb8 22.Na3 and White seems to have a lasting edge with good attacking chances on the Q-side.
But I do like the second suggestion (15…Nd4!), not the first move that jumped to my mind, but indeed this seems fine for Black after 16.Bxd4 cxd4 17.Bf3 Qf4 18.Qxd4 d5. Thanks!

To BladezII:
Your suggestion is very interesting but strikes me as slightly optimistic, as you suggest to sacrifice active pieces and remain a piece down for a few pawns after:
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.Bf4 e5 7.Be3
a6 8.N5c3 Nf6 9.Bc4 Be6 10.Nd5 Nxe4 11.Bb6 Qg5 12.Nc7+ Kd7 13.Be2
Nd4 14.O-O Bh3 15.Bf3 Nxf3+ 16.Qxf3 Qxg2+ 17.Qxg2 Bxg2 18.Kxg2
Rc8 19.Nd5 Nf6 20.Nbc3! (not 20.Ne3?! d5!) Nxd5 21.Nxd5 Rxc2 22.Rfd1! Rxb2 23.a4  I’m afraid that Black has to grovel for a lucky draw here as white is alarmingly active.
But the try is certainly interesting and I’ll give it another look. Thanks!

Niv 

     
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #95 - 04/03/06 at 11:04:48
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Hello,

    Don't worry about it Slates, people like Bladez like to assume other people are thick. Unfortunately can meet them in just about any chess club.
    Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #94 - 04/02/06 at 17:58:52
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Bladez,

I read both the quick repertoire and the annotations to the game, and agreed with what was said.  I don't know what any of that has to do with White missing the win at the end.  This was a curiosity, really - and nothing whatsoever to do with the opening play or any comments given in the book - it's just that White could have played 55.Qe7+ and won, something that is not relevant to the repertoire or opening, but strange nonetheless. I thought it was a typo until I checked the result elsewhere.  It seems time was likely to blame, but there was certainly no interpretation of mine of any sort that associated the result with anything the authors were trying to say.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #93 - 04/02/06 at 10:10:26
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There were 2 concrete opening questions. I'll try to answer them although what we had to say, we have said it. Now it is your turn to play or refute it. Finally only practical experience counts.
1. 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Qc7 5.Nc3 e6 6.Be2 Nf6 7.f4 looks to me overoptimistic due to 7...Nd4 8.Qd4 Bc5 9.Qd3 and now d5!? intending 10.e5 Ne4.

2.  1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6  5.Nb5 d6 6. Bf4 e5 7. Be3 a6 8. N5c3 Nf6 
9. Bc4 Be6 10. Nd5 Nxe4 11. Bb6 Qg5 12.Nc7+ Kd7 13. Be2 - Rc8 14.Ne6 fe6 15.0-0. I do not believe that White dreamed about being a pawn down when he jumped to d5. For instance many of you (and I) would prefer Black after 15...Be7. With such a massive pawn centre he hardly risks much.
Alternatively 15...Nd4 16.Bd4 ed4 17.Bf3 Qf4 18.Qd4 (18.c4 Ng5-/+; 18.Re1 Ng5-/+) d5 19.Rd1 Bd6 20.Be4 Qh2 looks like a perpetual, while 19.Be4 Rc4 20.Qa7 Kc6 is unclear to me.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #92 - 04/02/06 at 05:00:49
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slates wrote on 03/29/06 at 09:43:20:
One quick question regarding the game Daly- Tregubov, Cappelle la Grande 2000, which is given on page 38 of the book - why does Black win this game (after 54...Bxe6)? After 55.Qe7+ White has a winning position, doesn't he?  Am I missing something very obvious here, or did he run out of time, or....?

Thanks.


Slates,

I think you did not read or did not stop to ponder what was written in the book in the Quick repertoire and to the annotations in the complete games section.  Look at what the book says --

"It is supposed that Black has a universal set-up against this version of the Hedgehog.  In many games the second players half-automatically line up their forces by the following scheme, regardless of the opponent's action:.... "

Later he says:

"...Forget about this plan !"  And he gives and references the game by Daly vs Tregubov to support his point and to warn Black of what could happen.

Read pages 16 and 17 and you will see what I mean.  I hope this clarifies the misconception or the wrong interpretation you had about the contents of the book for that specific game.

Wink
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #91 - 04/01/06 at 20:36:41
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Here is one suggestion, it is certainly an active approach--

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6
5.Nb5 d6 6. Bf4 e5 7. Be3 a6 8. N5c3 Nf6
9. Bc4 Be6 10. Nd5 Nxe4 11. Bb6 Qg5 12.Nc7+ Kd7
13. Be2

This is your concern here,right ?  So my input is the following---computers do not prefer the following move for Black as their first choice--

13...  Nd4!

14. O-O Bh3 --  counterplay !

15. Bf3 Nxf3+ 16. Qxf3 Bxg2 17. Qxg2 Qxg2+
18.Kxg2 Rc8 19. Nd5 Nf6 20. Ne3 Rc6 21. Ba5 d5
22. Nd2 Bc5 23. c4 d4 24. Nf5 Nh5
25. Nb3 Ke6 

Black's activity and his two pawns, and maybe later three, seem to give him at least sufficient chances.

Angry
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #90 - 04/01/06 at 09:53:00
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In the line 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nb5 d6 6.Bf4 e5 7.Be3
a6 8.N5c3 Nf6 9.Bc4 Be6 10.Nd5 Delchev and Semkov give Nxe4 11.Bb6 Qg5 12.Nc7+ Kd7 13.Bxe6+ fxe6 14.Nxa8 Qxg2 with very good play for Black, but Fritz 9 suggests 13.Be2!? so after 13…Rc8 (13…Qxg2? 14.Bf3) 14.Nxe6 fxe6 15.0-0 Black is a pawn up, but his king is misplaced and he has trouble getting his pieces into play. Any thoughts on how black should proceed in that case?

Niv
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #89 - 04/01/06 at 06:56:17
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GM Delchev and IM Semkov recommend BLack uses and stays on the Taimanov.  Everytime GM Delchev thinks that BLack can transpose to a variation of the Scheveningen which at least as good for Black as the Taimanov proper, only then does he recommend Black do so.

Nevertheless, Black can choose to stay in Taimanov territory as long as White is willing to play as well.  I mean, as long as White is not playing some anti Sicilian or some irregular stuff.

Angry

  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #88 - 03/31/06 at 12:21:55
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so to try and understand you - you are saying that to play the ...Nf6 move order there is in fact a way to avoid transposition to Scheveningen successfully?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #87 - 03/30/06 at 14:34:17
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Greetings,

The book recommends both ...a6 and ...Nf6, it is your choice.  What I was pointing out is that for ...Nf6 there is no follow up for White's change or deviation and Black was out of the choice to using what is recommended in the book since that deviation by White is not covered.

I sent them an email and I received a response.  They showed me what to do in case White deviates from that specific move order and it really good stuff.    To me it is no longer an issue; it is settled.

Angry
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #86 - 03/30/06 at 13:45:54
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Hello,

It does not look like much of problem, just  switching order of a6 and Nf6 seems to get lines covered in book. Unless, I've missed something, don't play this as black either.

Bye John S
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #85 - 03/30/06 at 12:31:12
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Well that sounds like quite a dilemma for the poor soul trying to put a repertoire together based on this book! Does the book recommend 6...Nf6, It is years since I played this line but 6..a6 strikes me as more flexible.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #84 - 03/30/06 at 12:24:07
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Hello,

@BladezII

You might have found a line where Delchev does not practise what he preaches. According to my database search, he always plays 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be2 a6. In this position, although I think Nunn recommended it at one time, don't think 7.f4 is so great. Check out Nunn v Andersson games from the 80's. In the position you are interested in, supressing a chuckle, don't think have any better than 7...d6, unless can make 7...Bb4 work. (Would not bet on that, hardly stepping on the shoulders of giants, with this 7..Bb4 move LOL, sorry find this move order problem, quite an amusing thingy-up).

@slates

I think you are right, the end of the game looks like massive time scrable.

Bye John S

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #83 - 03/29/06 at 09:43:20
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One quick question regarding the game Daly- Tregubov, Cappelle la Grande 2000, which is given on page 38 of the book - why does Black win this game (after 54...Bxe6)? After 55.Qe7+ White has a winning position, doesn't he?  Am I missing something very obvious here, or did he run out of time, or....?

Thanks.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #82 - 03/29/06 at 01:13:47
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@ IM Semkov

I noticed an important move order was left out of the book.  In the book the following is covered--

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Qc7 5.Nc3 e6 6.Be2 Nf6   and I can't say enough or much more on how well written this book is, specifically the quality of the material.

Also,


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Qc7 5.Nc3 e6 6.f4 is covered in the book and here you give 6...  a6 and in case of

7.Be2,  you give 7...   b5


The problem I point out is that no mention is given the following move order--


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Qc7 5.Nc3 e6 6.Be2 Nf6  This is all according to book until....

7.f4

now black is not in the same position to be playing what you recommended earlier.  I think this is an important move deviation for WHite and I can't find it anywhere in the book.

I am in my studies and currently preparing for my opponent in the final round of an open correspondence tournament.  THe games I have looked transpose back to the Scheveningen with ...d6 , but I am interested in staying within Delchev's and your recommendation to stay in the Taimanov and besides, I bought the book to learn to play the Taimanov.

Best regards,

BladezII
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #81 - 03/16/06 at 20:10:34
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Bonsai, I suppose that any type of Taimanov is good against 5.Bc4. 5...Nf6 6.Nc3 a6 is certainly playable. I think that 6...Qc7 is more precise since 7.Ndb5?! Qb8 9.a4 stumbles into 9...a6 10.Nd4 (10.Na3 Bb4) Ne4! 11.Ne4 Qe5 - a typical double attack.
On 6...Qc7 7.Nc6 is obviously bad, so it remains 7.Bb3 a6 8.0-0 when both 8...b5 and 8...Bd6 9.g3 Nd4 10.Qd4 b5 (intending ...Be5) put White on the defensive.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #80 - 03/13/06 at 22:53:55
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I just played my first tournament game with the Taimanov and the opening went very well, I think:
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Bc4
I would suspect that this move doesn't really serve much of a purpose in this position. Maybe it makes the d7-d5 break a bit more difficult, but certainly in this game the bishop later dropped back to d3 anyway. So I basically seem to get an even better version of Part 8 of the book. I wonder though how bad this move really is (is there a way of continuing that makes is look more useful?) and whether one could have punished it harder (I certainly don't see anything tactical, but maybe something like 6...Bb4 or 7...b5?).
5...Nf6 6. Nc3 a6 7. O-O Qc7 8.Nxc6 bxc6 9. Qe2 Be7 10. Kh1 d5 11. exd5 cxd5 12. Bd3 O-O 13. f4
http://www.france-echecs.com/diagramme/imgboard.phpfen=rxbxxrkx%2Fxxqxbppp%2Fpxx...
Here I would think that black is better, but I then manage to help white improve his position with somewhat sloppy play:
13...Bb7 14. Bd2 Nd7 15. Rf3 g6 16. Rh3 Nc5 17. f5 exf5 18. Bxf5 Bf6
The plan Nf6-d7-c5(xd3) looks sensible enough here (aforementioned Part 8 of the book recommends it in a somewhat similar situation and I believe the idea is transferable to this case) and the computer thinks that both 15...Nc5 and 17...Nxd3 would have been improvements over the game (it looks like he's right, but during the game I was worried about various attacking chances for white that were in fact not so dangerous). Eventually I won this game, but that was much later. Comments welcome, particularly on the logic and reaction to Bc4 (of course also on everything else).
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #79 - 03/13/06 at 18:46:08
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ErictheRed wrote on 03/02/06 at 19:59:09:
I hate to put a damper on things, but I recieved  this book a couple of days ago and, thus far, I'm not tremendously impressed.  My first impressions are positive, mind you, but I think the book could have been much better.  Besides the poor translation (which actually gives the book a bit of "character"), I think the layout is awful.  The pages have a lot of whitespace and the diagrams are not very pleasing.  It is also difficult to find a particular variation as the index of variations is lacking.  For instance, I couldn't find 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd Nxd4 Nc6 5.c4 for ever; eventually I noticed that the position is covered under the order 3.c4 Nc6 4.d4. 

My biggest complaint is about the format; each "variation" is covered first, very lightly, in the "Quick Repertoire" section, then in more detail (with more analysis/theory) in the "Step by Step" section, and finally supplemented by complete games in another section.  I think the complete games section lacks sufficient annotations to make it as useful as it could be.  More irksome is the "Quick Repertiore" section; I feel that it is completely unnecessary.  Most of the material is just repeated in the "Step by Step" section.  I would have liked a beefier "Step by Step" section with a short introduction; as it is, I feel like the book has about 20 pages of fluff that could have been replaced with more analysis.  This is a personal opinion, though.

I want to point out, however, that the actual analysis is quite good, and that's what an opening book is all about.  Overall I am pleased with the book, I just think it has too much "filler" material that could have been cut in favour of more analysis in other areas.


"The actual analysis is quite good..."

Yes, and that really is the long and the short of it with Chess Stars books.  If there is one that is not worth the money, I haven't seen it.
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #78 - 03/12/06 at 19:10:03
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Semkov,
You may like to know I put the book to good use. I reached the exact position on page 162 and went on to win. I must say the queen sacrifice made quite an impression at the club Grin
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #77 - 03/09/06 at 12:08:52
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Very few people like the early b5-variation. It is
too symmetrical and nearly impossible to win if White just stays on
place. This line contradicts the overall spirit of Delchev's book -
to aim for a piece play. b5 has been known for many years and never
got a respectable status. It is also too meager on strategical ideas
so it cannot be a weapon a choice for a strong player. But meeting it with f4 seems awful to me. Perhaps Burgess nows better...
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #76 - 03/09/06 at 02:21:58
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Hello,

its a matter of taste of course, and wouldn't say i really "like" that early ...b5 variation, but Black's position is fairly resilient with reasonable counter-resources even though his development looks slow (a description that also applies to 5... a6 6. Nxc6 bxc6, which is quite a legitimate variation nowadays). Volokitin is a leading exponent of the Black side on these lines, while Burgess also thinks they are underrated. Certainly it's Black's only refuge if he doesn't like the pure Taimanov with 8. Be3 Bb4 9. Na4 etc, or transposing to the scheveningen, so in this sense the early ...b5 is important from a repertoire point of view.

According to IM Sommerbauer on Chessbase Paulsen CD, Delchev's 9. a4 is not as strong as the direct attack 9. f4 (citing Nataf-Volokitin, a game good for a laugh i must say), but of course such opinions can differ...  Smiley

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #75 - 03/08/06 at 19:16:25
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If you had not seen that game, Inn2, what are the reasons you like that variation for Black more?  And/or why do you find it more interesting?

Personally, I prefer to hold on the typical pawn advances as long as I can hold them without getting in trouble.  I prefer to develop Black's pieces first and attack white's center or his flanks late, after seeing how white arranges his position.  In most cases this is the safest approach since often White uses these pawn advances from Black to attack the pawns (they make logical targets) or to exploit the holes they leave behind.

I think White would have kept a solid edge after--

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 a6
6. Be2 Qc7 7. O-O b5 8. Nxc6 dxc6 9. a4 b4 10. Nb1 Nf6
11. Nd2 Bc5 12. Bd3 e5
13. a5 O-O 14. Nc4 Be6

and instead of 15.Qe2 as Delchev played, White would play

15. Qf3 !? (with the idea of Bg5! when ...h6 is impossible) 

15....           Bd4

16. Bg5  +/=

and if

16.....       Qe7
then 

17. Nb6 +/= 

White taking advantage of the holes in Black's position.  And White may later have ideas of playing c2-c3 (after preparing with perhaps Na4)  and using the Black pawns as targets.


Angry
  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #74 - 03/08/06 at 16:49:59
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haven't yet received my copy (currently travelling for awhile).. but was hoping for some coverage of early b5 lines like 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be2 a6 7. 0-0 b5 8. Nxc6 dxc6, which is more interesting to my eyes than main Taimanov. But this book is still a dream come true ( a safe sicilian indeed!).

Also noticed Delchev himself recently losing (as White!) in Delchev-N.Firman Cappelle La Grande 2006. A good advertisement for the opening i guess!?
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #73 - 03/06/06 at 08:51:47
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Semkov,

I bet you may rest assured: the book will sell, because of the good 'approach'.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #72 - 03/05/06 at 11:13:53
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Dear friends,
I started visiting chesspublishing.com about a year ago and "The Safest Sicilian" is strongly influenced by your comments on other books. As I point out in my foreword, readers often want opposite things. While it is impossible to please to all, I tried to listen to most of you. We started the Chess Stars opening series with the Classical (especially in the Soviet/Russian chess school) layout - like in the Opening for White according to Kramnik. The forum taught me that many of you like other formats too. So I decided to achieve a better readability and ease of use. Firstly I designed a new set of chess fonts - for the different levels of variations. I hope that now it is easier to navigate between main variations and sublevels. For the same reason I put extra space between the main lines and the commentaries. Secondly I put more diagrams (but smaller in order to accomodate them on a small page).
   "...some want heavy variations and analysis" - I can assure you that all the content is based on heavy original analysis right from Delchev's notebook. Every strong professional has his own theory and I've made a considerable effort to present the essence of it. You know that it is much more time consuming to write concisely, but meaningfully. Personally I have noticed that I never read the abundant commentaries of 1-2 famous GMs although I otherwise respect them much. Then why to bother you with lines that noone will remember or even read. There is more to it. Sometimes a concrete variation might turn incorrect, but time proves that the general assessment held true. It is up to magazines to digg into long variations. I believe that a book should give the essence.

Finally, you will judge the fate of this new format - by buying, or not buying, this book.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #71 - 03/04/06 at 18:36:27
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I also feel that the explanatory content is worth its weight in gold.  Some of the comments are very concise and to the point - there is much more information and guidance here than is found in many 'illustrative games' format books, although perhaps this is a result of the authors' personal familiarity with the opening, something that is noticeably missing from many other opening books.  I like the Quick Repertoire section, too - it is enabling me to quickly see where I am going astray in some lines that I have been playing for a few years now, although I'm still a relatively new (about 7 years) chess player.  I have the Burgess book on the Taimanov but found that to be too dense to really hold my interest for long.  It's fine to look up a move when you've gone wrong somewhere, but feels like a chore to sit and study too often.  I think ultimately the Delchev/Semkov book will stimulate interest in the Taimanov for more players than say the Burgess or Plaskett books (I quite like the Plaskett book, by the way, but think it is hampered by the standard Everyman format, ie no proper index of variations and problems hunting for some lines due to inclusion in chapters you wouldn't expect etc) due to it having more universal appeal through its mixture of formats/sections.  As Strptzr says, you can dip into a section and get the hang of what's going on, and return to get details later.  And as I said at the start, the quality of explanation is very good - not patronising, but not too advanced either. Or perhaps thats just indicative of the level I'm at, and maybe other readers find some of it too basic? Anyway, it's a book I'm glad I bought.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #70 - 03/03/06 at 14:24:55
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Well, Eric, the flaw you point out is a strongpoint in my eyes. The quick repertorie is manageable : I can browse through it, get the outline and start playing the opening. While playing some questions rise, which are neatly answered in the 'step by step' section. And for further investigation there are complete games.
It corresponds nicely to my 'approach'.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #69 - 03/03/06 at 03:53:29
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@Cresspahl:
Because the book lacks analysis of 7.Nc3 in the line you give, you said: "But please, dont take this as criticism, its really just a question about this very outstanding book. "  It's OK to criticise; you don't have to apologise!  Just criticise nicely.  I think your statement vindicates my earlier comments; if there was less space wasted on the poor layout, more lines like these could be covered.

Again, I don't want people to think that I'm bashing the book.  So far, everyone has had overwhelmingly positive things to say; I just want to point out some of the flaws that I see and show that the book is far from perfect, though still quite good.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #68 - 03/03/06 at 03:41:48
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I agree that "reading and nodding" is bad, and I like opening books with plenty of explanation and illustrative games.  However, I feel that the "Quick Repertoire" section is just redundant; most of the material is repeated in the "Step by Step" section.  I guess I would have liked a format where you get the instruction/overview in the form of well annotated games and the theory in a tree format, similar to the Pinski/Aagaard book on the Kalashnikov.  Although that book has other problems, I liked the format a lot; it had a great introduction with well-annotated games in addition to the theory section.  In The Safest Sicilian, I feel that we get the worst of both worlds: the theory section is lighter than it could have been because there is less space, and the illustrative games have almost no annotations at all. 

Don't get me wrong; I like the book.  It's the first book out on "my" main defence to 1.e4 since Burgess' book and has some nice new ideas.  I just think it has a little too much fluff and a bad index.  I'm not trashing the book; I hope I'm offering constructive criticism that the authors will keep in mind for future projects.

I guess it boils down to this: buyers of opening books vary widely in strength; I can imagine anyone from about 1400 USCF all the way up to IM or maybe GM buying and using this book.  On top of that, people learn in different ways and expect different things from books; some want heavy variations and analysis like in John Watson's Play the French, and others want more explanation like in Neil McDonald's Mastering the French With the Read and Play Method.  It's difficult to cater to all readers.  I'm a big fan of both the books I mentioned above even though they have vastly different presentations.  I feel that The Safest Sicilian can't quite decide which type of book it wants to be and ends up a second rate "hodgepodge" of both types.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #67 - 03/02/06 at 20:39:10
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Incidentally that is exactly how I use it, I just play through some illustrative games as well in step 1.
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #66 - 03/02/06 at 20:35:25
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I like the quick repetoire approach because it allows the the following way to learn an opening:

1. Read JUST the quick repetoire
2. Start playing it now (just in offhand or internet games if you're worried about your rating) and record your games.
3. Only then come back to read the step by step section, and it will now mean more to you, and you can also consider why you chose the moves you did rather than the recommended ones to get some more insight.
4. Play some more!
5. Then play the full games and see how the plans the GMs played compared with your own ideas.

It's a different, more practical approach to learning an opening, and more fun IMO than churning through a big opening tome before you dare to try it, which I think leads to what Rowson calls "reading and nodding" rather than developing chess skill.
  

Those who want to go by my perverse footsteps play such pawn structure with fuzzy atypical still strategic orientations

Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, stuck in the middlegame with you
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #65 - 03/02/06 at 19:59:09
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I hate to put a damper on things, but I recieved  this book a couple of days ago and, thus far, I'm not tremendously impressed.  My first impressions are positive, mind you, but I think the book could have been much better.  Besides the poor translation (which actually gives the book a bit of "character"), I think the layout is awful.  The pages have a lot of whitespace and the diagrams are not very pleasing.  It is also difficult to find a particular variation as the index of variations is lacking.  For instance, I couldn't find 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cd Nxd4 Nc6 5.c4 for ever; eventually I noticed that the position is covered under the order 3.c4 Nc6 4.d4. 

My biggest complaint is about the format; each "variation" is covered first, very lightly, in the "Quick Repertoire" section, then in more detail (with more analysis/theory) in the "Step by Step" section, and finally supplemented by complete games in another section.  I think the complete games section lacks sufficient annotations to make it as useful as it could be.  More irksome is the "Quick Repertiore" section; I feel that it is completely unnecessary.  Most of the material is just repeated in the "Step by Step" section.  I would have liked a beefier "Step by Step" section with a short introduction; as it is, I feel like the book has about 20 pages of fluff that could have been replaced with more analysis.  This is a personal opinion, though.

I want to point out, however, that the actual analysis is quite good, and that's what an opening book is all about.  Overall I am pleased with the book, I just think it has too much "filler" material that could have been cut in favour of more analysis in other areas.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #64 - 03/02/06 at 18:41:16
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impressive win by Akopian:
"short and sweet"

[Event "Gibraltar Masters"]
[Site "Gibraltar"]
[Date "2006.01.24"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Akopian,Vladimir"]
[Black "Cramling,Pia"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B48"]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.0-0-0 Bb4
9.f3 Ne5 10.Nb3 b5 11.Kb1 Be7 12.Qf2 d6 13.g4 Nfd7 14.Rg1 Bb7 15.g5 0-0 16.f4 b4
17.Na4 Nc4 18.Bxc4 Qxc4 19.f5 Qb5 20.f6 Qxa4 21.fxe7 Rfe8 22.Rxd6 Bxe4 23.Rg4 Bd5 24.Qe1 a5
25.Bd4 Bxb3 26.axb3 Qb5 27.Rxd7 a4 28.bxa4 Qf5 29.Rg3 e5 30.Ra7 Rac8 31.Qxe5  1-0





  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #63 - 03/02/06 at 17:48:26
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Dear Stormcrow,
I meant only the American vendors, not the readers of course! Thanks to you and your support, we are able to produce some good books. But we try to publish books only if our authors have something new to say. It seems that  Nimzo Qc2 (and the whole White Nimzo unfortunately for me for I have never played something else myself!) or the QID g3 is in a crisis of ideas or at least nobody has notified us that he had interesting ideas to share!
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #62 - 03/01/06 at 22:30:59
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Dear Mr Semkov,
I am fairly literate AND have a fine appreciation for good things, despite being an American.  I have purchased every single book that you've written/co-written for Chess Stars.  Thanks for such great opening guides! They are the crown jewels of my collection!   

                                                                                                                                         Regards, SC

P.S. I would love to see Chess Stars put out a book examining the Nimzo Qc2 or the QID g3!
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #61 - 03/01/06 at 21:30:33
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The thought that somebody would like to exchange his knight by 7.Nc3? never crossed my mind, I admit. I think that there is something in the book about trading knights - it is almost always in Black's favour in the c3-system.
7...Nxc3 8.bxc3 Qc7 9.Bd2 Nd7 is quite pleasant indeed. Delchev played it against Dgebuadze in 2005. However I think that move order is not very important. Black could also play immediately 8...Nd7 intending to capture on e5. As a rule, whitout the queen's knight White's attack has no venom while his hanging pawns in the centre get weaker with every further exchange.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #60 - 03/01/06 at 08:36:03
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Dear Semko,

I received my copy of this great and fascinating work last week and up to now only had the time to take a very brief look at it.

One thing stunned me:

In the position after 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.c3 Nf6 4.e5 Nd5 5.d4 cd 6.cd d6 you only cover 7.a3 and 7.Bc4, but what about 7.Nc3? It is played fairly often and right now I dont think it's worse than the above meontioned two mainlines. Or is there anything obvious I missed?

I would suggest 7...Nxc3 8.bxc3 Qc7 9.Bd2 Nd7 followed by a setup with b6/Bb7 etc. My verdict is =, so I expected to find a hint about this variation in your book. But please, dont take this as criticism, its really just a question about this very outstanding book.

Kind regards,
Cresspahl
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #59 - 02/27/06 at 20:28:42
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"It seems like everybody has bought this book now"
Well, no! The readers of this forum are simply more literate so they can appreciate good things. The Americans still do not know about the book and you'll have a secret weapon over them.
BladezII, I have only a little contribution to the chapter about 6.g3, but you got the idea of Delchev, introduced against Fressinet: g6,Kg7 and counterplay on the h-file by relocating the queen via Qd7-g8-h7 OR Qe6-g4 after e6-e5. Whenever White starts dreaming about e4-e5, we play e6-e5! Before the above-mentioned game Black used to keep the queen on the queenside.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #58 - 02/27/06 at 19:38:27
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Edward_Dearing wrote on 02/27/06 at 10:29:19:
Picked this up yesterday and haven't put it down since. A very, very nice piece of work, and a must for any open sicilian player.

Great job guys.

Best,

Ed


It seems like everybody has bought this book now  Cheesy
  

Those who want to go by my perverse footsteps play such pawn structure with fuzzy atypical still strategic orientations

Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, stuck in the middlegame with you
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #57 - 02/27/06 at 16:52:26
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1. e4   c5
2. Nf3 e6
3. d4  cxd4
4. Nxd4 Nc6  
5. Nc3   Qc7  
6. g3 a6
7. Bg2 d6
8. O-O Bd7
9. Re1 Be7
10. Nxc6 Bxc6
11. Qg4 h5
12. Qe2 h4
13. a4 hxg3
14. hxg3 Kf8
15. a5 Rc8
16. Be3 Nf6
17. Bb6 Qd7
18. f4

[/color]This little change is not mentioned in the book in a direct way, in the specific move order.  This being a brand new variation for me to learn as Black I made the following mistake--[color=#006600]

18...   Bd8 ?!

Trying to challenge the bishop on b6 and at the sametime angling for Bc7 to contest white's e5 push, but...

19. Bf2 !  

and my bishop was left looking silly and Black was severely limited in counterplay in addition to space.  After that, I was hurting.

So I tried to analyze how to deal with this other option not dealt with in the Delchev/Semkov book.  I sought for the same idea for white (the plan of f4 and Be3, Rad1) in the book and I found it.  It was to have ...g6 for Black, then ...Kg7, ...Qg8, ...Qh7, and ...e5.  So I came up with the following during my study--

18...       g6
19. Rad1 Qe8
20. Bd4   e5
21. Be3   Kg7
22. Rf1   Qg8  

With the idea of ...Qh7

and now we are back in the book, and with the same idea and plan for Black advocated by Delchev/Semkov  made possible.  In the book, you can find the above information on pages 150-151 and even more specific, on page 155, game 44, the notes to White's 17th move.

Any comments from those of you who own the book or from Semkov himself?

Angry


« Last Edit: 02/27/06 at 19:51:32 by BladezII »  

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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #56 - 02/27/06 at 10:29:19
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Picked this up yesterday and haven't put it down since. A very, very nice piece of work, and a must for any open sicilian player.

Great job guys.

Best,

Ed
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #55 - 02/24/06 at 22:55:54
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I should add that in most Sicilians White's knight on d4 is one of the most dangerous pieces - hence Nb3 is a considerable achievement of Black. Later a5-a4 could be with tempo.
Why White retreats the knight to b3 is another question. Delchev clearly explains that it is meant against d7-d5 which is however quite hazy. But this line is still young. It is possible that in 10 years it will be treated very differently. That's why we exhaustively analyse Qf2 instead of Qe1, trying to anticipate White's next step in the "English" battle.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #54 - 02/24/06 at 13:05:04
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Before we go all astray, I try to answer the question
From what I recall from memory (at work without the book and board). Nb3 is aimed against Bxc3, which is possible after most other moves. The bishop retreat is because after Qe1 there is an actual threat on the board. Iirc the threat after Qe1 is Nb5 which attacks both queen and bishop (no check on d2 anymore).
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #53 - 02/24/06 at 12:57:06
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Now, now... it was not that hateful either. After all he could have suggested the Philidor... (Excuse me, that should be 'the Lion').  Wink

I mean, some repertoirebashing is part of the game, and maybe even the greater part, as the choice between openings seems to be based on the 'character' rather than the objective merit... (And it can work the other way round, too : will you heed the advice of some member you know seems to favour some other lines you absolutely detest ?)
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #52 - 02/24/06 at 11:36:02
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TN - was that strictly necessary?  It certainly wasn't very helpful or informative.  I hope we're going to play nicely ...
  

If sometimes we fly too close to the sun, at least this shows we are spreading our wings.
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #51 - 02/23/06 at 21:44:21
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Quote:
Hello,

It probably just means I am not suited to playing the Sicilian, but I find the lines in this book very strange. For example,

[Event "Bajada de la Virgen op 3rd"]
[Site "Santa Cruz de la Palma"]
[Date "2005.06.13"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Kolev,Atanas"]
[Black "Delchev,Aleksander"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B48"]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.0-0-0 Bb4
9.f3 Ne5 10.Nb3 b5 11.Qe1 Be7 12.f4 Ng6 13.e5 Ng4 14.Bd2 Bb7 15.Bd3 Rc8 16.Ne4 0-0
17.h3 f5 18.Nd6 Bxd6 19.hxg4 Bxe5 20.fxe5 Nxe5 21.Kb1 Nxg4 22.Ba5 Qf4 23.Qh4 h6 24.Rd2 Rf7
25.Re2 Bd5 26.Bd2 Qd6 27.Rhe1 b4 28.Bc1 a5 29.Nd2 Qc6 30.Qg3 e5 31.b3 d6 32.Bc4 Rf6
33.Qd3 f4 34.Bb2 Rd8 35.Bb5 Qc7 1-0. This is maybe the game, where Delchev has found a big improvement, leading to winning positions for black. In opening, black plays Bb4-Be7, with no a3 played by white. Why 10.Nb3? with no pressure on d4. Then, white changes mind about pawn formation in centre, with f4 and e5. So it goes on, don't think I understand what was happening in any stage of this game.

        On other hand if make effort of studying this book, maybe opponents will be just as confused, which is a good step towards winning.

Bye John S



Yes.....I totally agree that you are not well suited for the complexities of the Sicilian Defence.

Perhaps the solid and steady Petroff would be a more prudent choice for you.

Regards,

Toppy Smiley
  

The man who tries to do something and fails is infinitely better than he who tries to do nothing and succeeds - Lloyd Jones Smiley
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #50 - 02/23/06 at 12:18:01
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Hello,

It probably just means I am not suited to playing the Sicilian, but I find the lines in this book very strange. For example,

[Event "Bajada de la Virgen op 3rd"]
[Site "Santa Cruz de la Palma"]
[Date "2005.06.13"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Kolev,Atanas"]
[Black "Delchev,Aleksander"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Eco "B48"]
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Qc7 6.Be3 a6 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.0-0-0 Bb4
9.f3 Ne5 10.Nb3 b5 11.Qe1 Be7 12.f4 Ng6 13.e5 Ng4 14.Bd2 Bb7 15.Bd3 Rc8 16.Ne4 0-0
17.h3 f5 18.Nd6 Bxd6 19.hxg4 Bxe5 20.fxe5 Nxe5 21.Kb1 Nxg4 22.Ba5 Qf4 23.Qh4 h6 24.Rd2 Rf7
25.Re2 Bd5 26.Bd2 Qd6 27.Rhe1 b4 28.Bc1 a5 29.Nd2 Qc6 30.Qg3 e5 31.b3 d6 32.Bc4 Rf6
33.Qd3 f4 34.Bb2 Rd8 35.Bb5 Qc7 1-0. This is maybe the game, where Delchev has found a big improvement, leading to winning positions for black. In opening, black plays Bb4-Be7, with no a3 played by white. Why 10.Nb3? with no pressure on d4. Then, white changes mind about pawn formation in centre, with f4 and e5. So it goes on, don't think I understand what was happening in any stage of this game.

        On other hand if make effort of studying this book, maybe opponents will be just as confused, which is a good step towards winning.

Bye John S

  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #49 - 02/21/06 at 14:22:07
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David,

Somebody mentioned an Ebay shop called Chess Books From Europe earlier in this thread. They will ship it to you in Spain. Sometimes they are the cheapest and other times not.
  
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #48 - 02/21/06 at 13:26:34
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Unfortunately there are no bullet-proof variations in the Sicilian, but I believe that Delchev's approach is as close to that as possible. He has an excellent endgame technique and happilly plays to win some slightly worse endings arising often after an early Nxd4 against different systems. However I voted against them as main lines because they tend to be too dry for Sicilian adepts.
The only other reasonable option for Black to avoid head-on attacks is the Sveshnikov, but my inner feeling tells me that these weak light-squares will finally prevail over Black's kingside activities. I'm hardly prejudiced since as a teenager back in 1975 I was the first to introduce and play regularly the Sveshnikov in Bulgaria (but at that time I new only few games of Gennady Timoschenko).
  
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Willempie
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #47 - 02/20/06 at 19:59:58
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Well that was basically what I meant. I understood it to mean that the move or variation looks good, but isnt "guaranteed" bullet proof as it isnt played (much) before.
Personally I liked a couple of those alternatives like the 10 g4 h6 11 h4 Bxc3, which I have looked at to check some possible variations.
  

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Semkov(Guest)
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #46 - 02/20/06 at 15:30:14
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Willempie,
Our backup variations do not mean that we had doubts in the main line. It only means that the other variation seems good too, but Delchev does not recommend it as a main line because he has not tested it in practice. On the other hand, in the Sicilian everything could change overnight. It's better to have a back door,even without knowing too well where it leads!
  
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David(Guest)
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Re: The Delchev/Semkov book
Reply #45 - 02/20/06 at 15:26:41
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