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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Tim Taylor's Bird book (Read 56295 times)
Pcal
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #63 - 08/12/14 at 00:43:36
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With any book you have to pull your own ideas from it.  Yet, I know what you guys mean by steering clear of lines offered in a popular book.  I stay clear of Danielsen's 4.h3 response the the "recipe"  ( I just don't trust that line) Against the "recipe" I've always preferred to go into "colors reversed" French lines with a tempo up (Yes I'm a French Player) or (as Taylor points out "favorable" lines in the King's Gambit. Although before Taylor's book, I didn't know these lines were King's Gambit lines..
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #62 - 04/23/14 at 16:16:18
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Hmm, I know that some authors before Taylor (Harding, O'Kelly) also thought that the line with 11...Rh7 is bad for White.  I notice MCO (de Firmian, after Taylor) thinking that 12. Be3 is unclear.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #61 - 04/18/14 at 20:06:19
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HgMan wrote on 08/31/07 at 20:08:42:
In all seriousness, though, I quite liked the Bird until I got Taylor's book.    Undecided

Maybe I relied too much on his recommendations rather than looking at the positions myself, but I think I was doing better on my own.  The Bird will reward the player who spends some time developing a repertoire with it; there's a lot of unexplored territory here, which is exciting.  Adherence to book recommendations won't work for that...


Resurrecting this quote, because I agree 110% with you.  It is important not to lean 100% on the author's conclusions, but rather to take their POV and evaluate it. 

There have been many Bird lines I have stayed clear of SOLELY because of Taylor, until I had enough of following blindly and decided to evaluate my own paths.  I have found that while the book does have some decent ideas, it leaves a lot of room for players to find their own paths...even Taylor played the b3 setup with White, which he slightly dissed in his book, but ventured into it with a reversed Dutch with Be2-b5, eliminating any tempo issues early on.

BUT the line I mention here is the analysis on From's Gambit with 1. f4 e5 2. fe d6 3. ed Bd 4. Nf3 g5 5. d4 g4 6. Ng5.  Taylor says that the sac is not sufficient to be played, and I believe he covers ...f5 7. e4 h6 8. Nh3 gN 9. Qh5+ with Bc4 and says that with ...Rh7, Black has better chances.

Soltis also analyzed this line in his book and seemed to think White had reasonable chances, yet I steered clear of this line, until about a month ago, when I decided to uncork it and scored a 21-move mini.

I posted the line in a group, and a guy analyzed the idea with Fritz 12, that showed the position as dead even, even with White being down the knight in exchange for the strong central pawns and open lines and Black's exposed king. 

There are MANY things that Taylor said that are beneficial, but still should be scrutinized.  Also, I saw Tait's analysis on 7. Ne4 and I use that line all the time.  I think it is the right path to take.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #60 - 04/01/14 at 20:39:41
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TalJechin wrote on 04/01/14 at 11:50:05:


Thanks, I guess it's my computer. Tried it on another and it worked.
  
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TalJechin
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #59 - 04/01/14 at 11:50:05
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #58 - 04/01/14 at 02:32:31
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JEH wrote on 08/31/07 at 19:55:20:
alumbrado wrote on 08/31/07 at 18:30:32:
This thread is reinforcing my view that the Bird is played mostly by people who smoked too much dope at college ...  Grin


That's the most accurate analysis of the Bird I've every seen  Smiley

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"Damn, I keep dropping the spliff"


Hi all, I was wondering if there is anywhere you can view the video's on the polar bear by GM Danielson. I tried this web site Chessdom, but it does not seem to work.

Been thinking of playing f4 recently. It seems like a lot of people like the Leningrad style. I looked a little bit at Andrew Martin's chess base video and Tim Taylor's book. What really caught my eye was dangerous weapons. They give a few games by GM Danielson and I was impressed. I also have his CB video's on the London and though he did a great job. Would have like to see his bird stuff.

Well if GM Danielson bird videos are gone, anything else out there? I think there might have been a foxy or maybe some other video out there on it but cannot seem to find it when I search the net. I think it was combined with some other openings maybe.

Thanks.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #57 - 10/08/07 at 07:02:28
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MNb wrote on 10/08/07 at 02:58:53:
A lot of ancient examples of the Swiss Gambit can be found at

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/swiss.html

Nice link!
  

Yusupov once said that “The problem with the Dutch Defence is that later in many positions the best move would be ...f5-f7” but he is surely wrong.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #56 - 10/08/07 at 05:58:06
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MNb wrote on 10/08/07 at 02:58:53:
A lot of ancient examples of the Swiss Gambit can be found at

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/swiss.html


Thanks for the information, that's a quite interesting link.  Smiley
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #55 - 10/08/07 at 02:58:53
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A lot of ancient examples of the Swiss Gambit can be found at

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/swiss.html
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #54 - 10/06/07 at 04:42:35
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Quote:
Another unclear recommendation I find 1 f4 f5 2 b3 b6 3 Bb2 Bb7 4 e3 e6!? 5 Qh5!, weakening the black squares as Taylor states. I presume the game would continue with 5 .. g6 6 Qe2 (where else?) Nf6. The only reasonable development I then see for white is to continue with Nf3, g3 and Bg2. Leaving black in a symetrical position with a tempo ahead. It looks to me that 1 .. f5 is quite solid.


There is a game on the Chessbase site that continued 6.Qh3!? with the idea of continuing Be2,Bf3.  White lost that game(!) but I think his play is easily improved and anyway this is certainly a lot more interesting than 6.Qe2.

I think the gambit 1.f4 f5 2.e4 e6 (maybe 2...fxe4 3.d3 exd3 4.Bxd3 Nf6 5.Nf3 d5! 6.Ne5 or 6.0-0 is about equal) 3.Nf3 fxe4 4.Ng5 has been mentioned here before (by me I think), but I thought I'd mention that I found a big improvement for White over Taylor's variations that leads to a completely winning game for White.  If anybody has been planning on playing this then I'll dig up the analysis.

As for the "dope smoking" comment made by Alumbrado, well I've actually heard of quite a few strong players who used this activity before tournaments presumably to get them into the right frame of mind, but perhaps this should be the topic of another post!  Smiley  For the record, I came out of my chess tournament semi-retirement a week ago and played the Bird three times and scoring 1 win and 2 draws.  The one win and one of the draws transposed into variations of the Closed Sicilian which seems normal enough and I like having avoided 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 e6.  The third draw began 1.f4 Nf6 2.Nf3 Nf6 and for some reason I deviated from my original play of 3.g3 and chose 3.e3 instead and he played the solid 3...Bf5 variation.  I rather agree with TalJechin's comments about playing 1.f4, White often has to be prepared to play a long game but I'm not so sure this is so different than other Flank openings such as certain variations of the Reti and English.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #53 - 09/01/07 at 18:12:32
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TalJechin wrote on 09/01/07 at 10:49:29:
I had a similar experience when I tried it out in online blitz, playing the Iljin with an xtra tempo got me nowhere. While experimenting with an accelerated Leningrad was more fun despite Taylor's lack of enthusiasm. And the Antoshin of course. I even had some fun Stonewalls with Nf3-e5 and Qf3 a la Tarrasch.

I am also quite disappointed by his lack of enthousiasm toward the Leningrad Bird (and so by the lack of material he presented: in fact he shows more how badly black could play but forgets that blacks can also have good plans and go for other systems than d5,c5,Nf6,g6,Bg7 - the last I have some problem with Gurgenidze setups and still haven't found an enjoying solution)
  

Yusupov once said that “The problem with the Dutch Defence is that later in many positions the best move would be ...f5-f7” but he is surely wrong.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #52 - 09/01/07 at 10:49:29
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HgMan wrote on 08/31/07 at 20:08:42:
In all seriousness, though, I quite liked the Bird until I got Taylor's book.    Undecided

Maybe I relied too much on his recommendations rather than looking at the positions myself, but I think I was doing better on my own.  The Bird will reward the player who spends some time developing a repertoire with it; there's a lot of unexplored territory here, which is exciting.  Adherence to book recommendations won't work for that...


I had a similar experience when I tried it out in online blitz, playing the Iljin with an xtra tempo got me nowhere. While experimenting with an accelerated Leningrad was more fun despite Taylor's lack of enthusiasm. And the Antoshin of course. I even had some fun Stonewalls with Nf3-e5 and Qf3 a la Tarrasch.

But the key to playing the Bird well is imo to keep an open mind about one's set-up - it's not as simple as playing the Colle or London, but if you want original games it's a good option! Though I wouldn't always play 1.f4 as it's a bit like starting a game with a 2nd serve, so you really must be in the mood for a long game.

However, for the KGeers out there, I noticed that 1.f4 e5 2.e4 will more often than usual (something like +30% instead of 10%) end up in a Falkbeer Counter Gambit (i.e. 2...d5 3.ed5 e4), with black often 'leaving book' after move 6. So in blitz this can be good practice on these quite messy middlegames.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #51 - 08/31/07 at 21:06:50
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thibdb13 wrote on 08/31/07 at 05:47:48:
Black_Widow wrote on 08/30/07 at 19:53:00:
Do you mean 1 e4 d5 2 Nf3 Bg4?

1. f4-e5
2. fe5-Bg4 !? (or maybe ?! Huh)

For sure it is a surprising move, but I think it has most chance in blindfold chess! Wink
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #50 - 08/31/07 at 20:08:42
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In all seriousness, though, I quite liked the Bird until I got Taylor's book.    Undecided

Maybe I relied too much on his recommendations rather than looking at the positions myself, but I think I was doing better on my own.  The Bird will reward the player who spends some time developing a repertoire with it; there's a lot of unexplored territory here, which is exciting.  Adherence to book recommendations won't work for that...
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #49 - 08/31/07 at 20:02:24
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...man, I'm hungry.  I coulda sworn I'd left some snacks around here somewhere...
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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