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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Tim Taylor's Bird book (Read 56294 times)
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #63 - 08/12/14 at 00:43:36
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With any book you have to pull your own ideas from it.  Yet, I know what you guys mean by steering clear of lines offered in a popular book.  I stay clear of Danielsen's 4.h3 response the the "recipe"  ( I just don't trust that line) Against the "recipe" I've always preferred to go into "colors reversed" French lines with a tempo up (Yes I'm a French Player) or (as Taylor points out "favorable" lines in the King's Gambit. Although before Taylor's book, I didn't know these lines were King's Gambit lines..
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #62 - 04/23/14 at 16:16:18
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Hmm, I know that some authors before Taylor (Harding, O'Kelly) also thought that the line with 11...Rh7 is bad for White.  I notice MCO (de Firmian, after Taylor) thinking that 12. Be3 is unclear.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #61 - 04/18/14 at 20:06:19
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HgMan wrote on 08/31/07 at 20:08:42:
In all seriousness, though, I quite liked the Bird until I got Taylor's book.    Undecided

Maybe I relied too much on his recommendations rather than looking at the positions myself, but I think I was doing better on my own.  The Bird will reward the player who spends some time developing a repertoire with it; there's a lot of unexplored territory here, which is exciting.  Adherence to book recommendations won't work for that...


Resurrecting this quote, because I agree 110% with you.  It is important not to lean 100% on the author's conclusions, but rather to take their POV and evaluate it. 

There have been many Bird lines I have stayed clear of SOLELY because of Taylor, until I had enough of following blindly and decided to evaluate my own paths.  I have found that while the book does have some decent ideas, it leaves a lot of room for players to find their own paths...even Taylor played the b3 setup with White, which he slightly dissed in his book, but ventured into it with a reversed Dutch with Be2-b5, eliminating any tempo issues early on.

BUT the line I mention here is the analysis on From's Gambit with 1. f4 e5 2. fe d6 3. ed Bd 4. Nf3 g5 5. d4 g4 6. Ng5.  Taylor says that the sac is not sufficient to be played, and I believe he covers ...f5 7. e4 h6 8. Nh3 gN 9. Qh5+ with Bc4 and says that with ...Rh7, Black has better chances.

Soltis also analyzed this line in his book and seemed to think White had reasonable chances, yet I steered clear of this line, until about a month ago, when I decided to uncork it and scored a 21-move mini.

I posted the line in a group, and a guy analyzed the idea with Fritz 12, that showed the position as dead even, even with White being down the knight in exchange for the strong central pawns and open lines and Black's exposed king. 

There are MANY things that Taylor said that are beneficial, but still should be scrutinized.  Also, I saw Tait's analysis on 7. Ne4 and I use that line all the time.  I think it is the right path to take.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #60 - 04/01/14 at 20:39:41
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TalJechin wrote on 04/01/14 at 11:50:05:


Thanks, I guess it's my computer. Tried it on another and it worked.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #59 - 04/01/14 at 11:50:05
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #58 - 04/01/14 at 02:32:31
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JEH wrote on 08/31/07 at 19:55:20:
alumbrado wrote on 08/31/07 at 18:30:32:
This thread is reinforcing my view that the Bird is played mostly by people who smoked too much dope at college ...  Grin


That's the most accurate analysis of the Bird I've every seen  Smiley

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Hi all, I was wondering if there is anywhere you can view the video's on the polar bear by GM Danielson. I tried this web site Chessdom, but it does not seem to work.

Been thinking of playing f4 recently. It seems like a lot of people like the Leningrad style. I looked a little bit at Andrew Martin's chess base video and Tim Taylor's book. What really caught my eye was dangerous weapons. They give a few games by GM Danielson and I was impressed. I also have his CB video's on the London and though he did a great job. Would have like to see his bird stuff.

Well if GM Danielson bird videos are gone, anything else out there? I think there might have been a foxy or maybe some other video out there on it but cannot seem to find it when I search the net. I think it was combined with some other openings maybe.

Thanks.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #57 - 10/08/07 at 07:02:28
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MNb wrote on 10/08/07 at 02:58:53:
A lot of ancient examples of the Swiss Gambit can be found at

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/swiss.html

Nice link!
  

Yusupov once said that “The problem with the Dutch Defence is that later in many positions the best move would be ...f5-f7” but he is surely wrong.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #56 - 10/08/07 at 05:58:06
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MNb wrote on 10/08/07 at 02:58:53:
A lot of ancient examples of the Swiss Gambit can be found at

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/swiss.html


Thanks for the information, that's a quite interesting link.  Smiley
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #55 - 10/08/07 at 02:58:53
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A lot of ancient examples of the Swiss Gambit can be found at

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/swiss.html
  

The book had the effect good books usually have: it made the stupids more stupid, the intelligent more intelligent and the other thousands of readers remained unchanged.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #54 - 10/06/07 at 04:42:35
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Quote:
Another unclear recommendation I find 1 f4 f5 2 b3 b6 3 Bb2 Bb7 4 e3 e6!? 5 Qh5!, weakening the black squares as Taylor states. I presume the game would continue with 5 .. g6 6 Qe2 (where else?) Nf6. The only reasonable development I then see for white is to continue with Nf3, g3 and Bg2. Leaving black in a symetrical position with a tempo ahead. It looks to me that 1 .. f5 is quite solid.


There is a game on the Chessbase site that continued 6.Qh3!? with the idea of continuing Be2,Bf3.  White lost that game(!) but I think his play is easily improved and anyway this is certainly a lot more interesting than 6.Qe2.

I think the gambit 1.f4 f5 2.e4 e6 (maybe 2...fxe4 3.d3 exd3 4.Bxd3 Nf6 5.Nf3 d5! 6.Ne5 or 6.0-0 is about equal) 3.Nf3 fxe4 4.Ng5 has been mentioned here before (by me I think), but I thought I'd mention that I found a big improvement for White over Taylor's variations that leads to a completely winning game for White.  If anybody has been planning on playing this then I'll dig up the analysis.

As for the "dope smoking" comment made by Alumbrado, well I've actually heard of quite a few strong players who used this activity before tournaments presumably to get them into the right frame of mind, but perhaps this should be the topic of another post!  Smiley  For the record, I came out of my chess tournament semi-retirement a week ago and played the Bird three times and scoring 1 win and 2 draws.  The one win and one of the draws transposed into variations of the Closed Sicilian which seems normal enough and I like having avoided 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 e6.  The third draw began 1.f4 Nf6 2.Nf3 Nf6 and for some reason I deviated from my original play of 3.g3 and chose 3.e3 instead and he played the solid 3...Bf5 variation.  I rather agree with TalJechin's comments about playing 1.f4, White often has to be prepared to play a long game but I'm not so sure this is so different than other Flank openings such as certain variations of the Reti and English.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #53 - 09/01/07 at 18:12:32
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TalJechin wrote on 09/01/07 at 10:49:29:
I had a similar experience when I tried it out in online blitz, playing the Iljin with an xtra tempo got me nowhere. While experimenting with an accelerated Leningrad was more fun despite Taylor's lack of enthusiasm. And the Antoshin of course. I even had some fun Stonewalls with Nf3-e5 and Qf3 a la Tarrasch.

I am also quite disappointed by his lack of enthousiasm toward the Leningrad Bird (and so by the lack of material he presented: in fact he shows more how badly black could play but forgets that blacks can also have good plans and go for other systems than d5,c5,Nf6,g6,Bg7 - the last I have some problem with Gurgenidze setups and still haven't found an enjoying solution)
  

Yusupov once said that “The problem with the Dutch Defence is that later in many positions the best move would be ...f5-f7” but he is surely wrong.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #52 - 09/01/07 at 10:49:29
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HgMan wrote on 08/31/07 at 20:08:42:
In all seriousness, though, I quite liked the Bird until I got Taylor's book.    Undecided

Maybe I relied too much on his recommendations rather than looking at the positions myself, but I think I was doing better on my own.  The Bird will reward the player who spends some time developing a repertoire with it; there's a lot of unexplored territory here, which is exciting.  Adherence to book recommendations won't work for that...


I had a similar experience when I tried it out in online blitz, playing the Iljin with an xtra tempo got me nowhere. While experimenting with an accelerated Leningrad was more fun despite Taylor's lack of enthusiasm. And the Antoshin of course. I even had some fun Stonewalls with Nf3-e5 and Qf3 a la Tarrasch.

But the key to playing the Bird well is imo to keep an open mind about one's set-up - it's not as simple as playing the Colle or London, but if you want original games it's a good option! Though I wouldn't always play 1.f4 as it's a bit like starting a game with a 2nd serve, so you really must be in the mood for a long game.

However, for the KGeers out there, I noticed that 1.f4 e5 2.e4 will more often than usual (something like +30% instead of 10%) end up in a Falkbeer Counter Gambit (i.e. 2...d5 3.ed5 e4), with black often 'leaving book' after move 6. So in blitz this can be good practice on these quite messy middlegames.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #51 - 08/31/07 at 21:06:50
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thibdb13 wrote on 08/31/07 at 05:47:48:
Black_Widow wrote on 08/30/07 at 19:53:00:
Do you mean 1 e4 d5 2 Nf3 Bg4?

1. f4-e5
2. fe5-Bg4 !? (or maybe ?! Huh)

For sure it is a surprising move, but I think it has most chance in blindfold chess! Wink
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #50 - 08/31/07 at 20:08:42
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In all seriousness, though, I quite liked the Bird until I got Taylor's book.    Undecided

Maybe I relied too much on his recommendations rather than looking at the positions myself, but I think I was doing better on my own.  The Bird will reward the player who spends some time developing a repertoire with it; there's a lot of unexplored territory here, which is exciting.  Adherence to book recommendations won't work for that...
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #49 - 08/31/07 at 20:02:24
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...man, I'm hungry.  I coulda sworn I'd left some snacks around here somewhere...
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #48 - 08/31/07 at 19:55:20
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alumbrado wrote on 08/31/07 at 18:30:32:
This thread is reinforcing my view that the Bird is played mostly by people who smoked too much dope at college ...  Grin


That's the most accurate analysis of the Bird I've every seen  Smiley


"Damn, I keep dropping the spliff"
  

Those who want to go by my perverse footsteps play such pawn structure with fuzzy atypical still strategic orientations

Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, stuck in the middlegame with you
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #47 - 08/31/07 at 18:30:32
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This thread is reinforcing my view that the Bird is played mostly by people who smoked too much dope at college ...  Grin
  

If sometimes we fly too close to the sun, at least this shows we are spreading our wings.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #46 - 08/31/07 at 05:47:48
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Black_Widow wrote on 08/30/07 at 19:53:00:
Do you mean 1 e4 d5 2 Nf3 Bg4?

1. f4-e5
2. fe5-Bg4 !? (or maybe ?! Huh)
  

Yusupov once said that “The problem with the Dutch Defence is that later in many positions the best move would be ...f5-f7” but he is surely wrong.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #45 - 08/30/07 at 19:53:00
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Do you mean 1 e4 d5 2 Nf3 Bg4?
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #44 - 08/29/07 at 18:32:24
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HgMan wrote on 02/06/06 at 22:13:18:
Does Tim Taylor offer anything on the From line:

1 f4 e5 2 fxe5 d6 3 exd6 Bxd6 4 Nf3 Bg4 ?

I suppose it's less common, but how does Black fare?

What should white play in case black plays Bg4 on the second move? I had such a game yesterday on the internet and I continue with g3, Bg2, d4 and Qd3 hoping for a Lasker like position. I eventually won in a difficult situation (my opponent went out of time - I presume he did not feel comfortable) but I am not qure my plan was the correct one. Huh
  

Yusupov once said that “The problem with the Dutch Defence is that later in many positions the best move would be ...f5-f7” but he is surely wrong.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #43 - 10/11/06 at 11:53:49
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Also in the From are some important lines missing, such as an early ... Bg4. However I noticed, that sometimes the information is there, but not on the place where you expect it. Like the introduction section.

But the books covers a lot of ground and gives lots of new good analysis and evaluations. However I would like to see an update, or Danielsen's book, if ever published.

  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #42 - 10/10/06 at 14:12:42
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From what I have gathered by reading this thread, Taylor 's book is meant to be an exhaustive overview of 1.f4. But apparently several important lines are not covered at all. If a second edition is published, it will have to include 1. ...d6 ; 2. Ktf3 e5 and 1. ...d6 ; 2. Ktf3 Bg4 or an other second-move recommendation for White, as well as the From line 1. ...e5 ; 2. fe d6 ; 3. Ktf3 Bg4 (as discussed above) and perhaps also 1. ...Kth6.
TalJechin mentions that he also forgot 1. ...d5 ; 2. Ktf3 Ktc6 and 1. ...d5 ; 2. Ktf3 Ktf6 followed by the "London" ...Bf5 or "Colle"...e6, although the "Torre" 3. e3 Bg4 is apparently included. Has he also not covered 1. ...d5 2. Ktf3 Bg4 ? Any other lines that were ommitted?
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #41 - 10/10/06 at 11:03:14
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Dragonslayer wrote on 07/24/06 at 12:40:59:
I don't have Taylor's book, what does he prefer instead of 3.Nf3. 3.Nc3?


yes Smiley
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #40 - 08/12/06 at 20:31:08
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It seems like a good introduction to the Bird, even if there are some things missing like black 1...d5 set-ups not going into a reversed main line set-up, e.g 1.f4 d5 2.Nf3 Nc6 or a black London set-up.

And he seems to have forgotten or missed Tartakower, who was a brilliant Dutch and Bird player! E.g:

Maroczy,G - Tartakower,S [A85]
Teplitz-Schoenau Teplitz-Schoenau (4), 1922

1.d4 e6 2.c4 f5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.a3 Be7 5.e3 0-0 6.Bd3 d5 7.Nf3 c6 8.0-0 Ne4 9.Qc2 Bd6 10.b3 Nd7 11.Bb2 Rf6 12.Rfe1 Rh6 13.g3 Qf6 14.Bf1 g5 15.Rad1 g4 16.Nxe4 fxe4 17.Nd2 Rxh2 18.Kxh2 Qxf2+ 19.Kh1 Nf6 20.Re2 Qxg3 21.Nb1 Nh5 22.Qd2 Bd7 23.Rf2 Qh4+ 24.Kg1 Bg3 25.Bc3 Bxf2+ 26.Qxf2 g3 27.Qg2 Rf8 28.Be1 Rxf1+ 29.Kxf1 e5 30.Kg1 Bg4 31.Bxg3 Nxg3 32.Re1 Nf5 33.Qf2 Qg5 34.dxe5 Bf3+ 35.Kf1 Ng3+ 0-1

and perhaps the game that inspired Larsen to play b2-b4 in the Bird, but here it's a Orangutang that tries to fly:

Tartakower,S - Maroczy,G [A00]
New York New York, 1924

1.b4 Nf6 2.Bb2 e6 3.b5 d5 4.e3 Be7 5.f4 0-0 6.Bd3 a6 7.a4 axb5 8.axb5 Rxa1 9.Bxa1 Nbd7 10.Nf3 Ne4 11.0-0 f5 12.Be2 Nd6 13.Qc1 Bf6 14.Na3 c6 15.bxc6 bxc6 16.Ne5 Bxe5 17.fxe5 Nf7 18.d4 Ng5 19.c4 Ba6 20.Re1 Qa8 21.Bc3 Rb8 22.Qc2 Ne4 23.Bd3 Rb7 24.Rc1 Nb6 25.Be1 h6 26.Bxe4 dxe4 27.Qc3 Nd7 28.Rb1 Rxb1 29.Nxb1 Qb7 30.Na3 Qb6 31.Bd2 Kf7 32.g3 Nf8 33.Qb4 Qxb4 34.Bxb4 Nd7 35.Ba5 g5 36.Kf2 Ke8 37.Ke2 c5 38.Nb5 Kf7 39.Kd2 cxd4 40.exd4 f4 41.Nd6+ Kg6 42.Kc3 e3 43.Kd3 Nb8 44.Ke4 Nc6 45.Bc3 e2 46.gxf4 gxf4 47.Bd2 f3 48.Kxf3 Nxd4+ 49.Ke3 Nf5+ 50.Kxe2 Nxd6 51.exd6 Bxc4+ 52.Ke3 Bb5 53.Kd4 h5 54.Kc5 Ba4 ½-½


Tartakower,S - Asztalos,L [A03]
Budapest Budapest (13), 1913

1.f4 d5 2.e3 e6 3.Nf3 c5 4.b3 Nc6 5.Bb5 Nf6 6.Bb2 Be7 7.0-0 0-0 8.Bxc6 bxc6 9.Ne5 Qc7 10.d3 a5 11.Qe2 a4 12.Nd2 axb3 13.axb3 Rxa1 14.Rxa1 Bb7 15.g4 Ra8 16.Rxa8+ Bxa8 17.g5 Nd7 18.Ndf3 Nxe5 19.Bxe5 Qa5 20.c4 Bb7 21.Kf2 Kf8 22.h4 Ba6 23.h5 Bb7 24.h6 g6 25.Kf1 Qa3 26.Qb2 Qxb2 27.Bxb2 Bd6 28.Nh2 Ke8 29.Ng4 Be7 30.Be5 Kd7 31.Ke2 Ke8 32.Kd2 Kd7 33.Kc2 Ke8 34.Kb2 Kd7 35.Ka3 Ke8 36.Ka4 Kd7 37.Bb8 Kc8 38.Ba7 Kd7 39.Bb6 d4 40.e4 Ke8 41.e5 Kd7 42.Nf2 1-0


Tartakower,S - Barasz,Z [A03]
Budapest Budapest (2), 1913

1.f4 d5 2.e3 e6 3.Nf3 c5 4.b3 Nc6 5.Bb2 Nf6 6.Bb5 Bd7 7.0-0 Bd6 8.Qe2 0-0 9.d3 a6 10.Bxc6 Bxc6 11.Nbd2 Ne8 12.g3 b5 13.e4 d4 14.c3 dxc3 15.Bxc3 Be7 16.Rac1 Rc8 17.Rfd1 Bb7 18.a4 Bf6 19.axb5 axb5 20.Rc2 Bxc3 21.Rxc3 Ba6 22.Rc2 Nd6 23.Rdc1 Qb6 24.Qf2 Nb7 25.b4 Qd6 26.bxc5 Qxd3 27.Rc3 Qd8 28.Ra3 Rc6 29.Ne5 Qc7 30.Nxc6 Qxc6 31.Nb3 Ra8 32.Rca1 Nd8 33.Qd4 Nb7 34.Qe3 Nd8 35.Qd2 Nb7 36.Nd4 Qxe4 37.Rxa6 1-0


Tartakower,S - Spielmann,R [A02]
Vienna m Vienna, 1913

1.f4 e5 2.fxe5 d6 3.exd6 Bxd6 4.Nf3 g5 5.d4 g4 6.Ne5 Nc6 7.Nxc6 bxc6 8.g3 h5 9.Bg2 h4 10.Qd3 Bd7 11.Nc3 Rb8 12.0-0 hxg3 13.hxg3 c5 14.Bf4 Bxf4 15.Rxf4 Qg5 16.Ne4 Qh6 17.Nxc5 Nf6 18.Nxd7 Nxd7 19.Qe4+ Kd8 20.Rxf7 Re8 21.Qxg4 Qe3+ 22.Kf1 1-0


But the game that made me write this was the following:


Tartakower,S - Winter,W [A02]
Nottingham Nottingham, 1936

1.f4 e5 2.fxe5 d6 3.exd6 Bxd6 4.Nf3 g5 5.d4 g4 6.Ng5 Qe7 7.Qd3 f5 8.h3 Nc6 9.hxg4 Nb4 10.Qb3 f4 11.Bd2 Nxc2+ 12.Qxc2 Qxg5 13.Nc3 Nf6 14.Ne4 Nxe4 15.Qxe4+ Qe7 16.Qf3 Be6 17.Qxb7 0-0 18.Qf3 Qg7 19.Bc3 Bxg4 20.Qd5+ Kh8 21.0-0-0 Rae8 22.Rd3 Bf5 23.Rf3 Be4 24.Qh5 Bxf3 25.exf3 Re3 26.Bc4 Rfe8 27.Bb3 R8e7 28.Qf5 c5 29.Rxh7+ Qxh7 30.Qf8+ 1-0

When reading Tartakower's My Best Games of Chess, he mentions that Winter proposed they should play a From's Gambit on the night before the game since he 'was in possession of an infallible means of beating me in this variation'.

Considering any agreement beforehand being illegal, Tartakower refused the proposition, but the next day he decided to give Winter the opportunity of 'realising his intentions'...

Anyway, it seems that Tartakower (probably wisely) dodged the bullet with 6.Ng5 - but it could be fun to see if anyone here, who might have access to British chess magazines from 1936 and forward, would know if Winter published his idea as an article or comment? (In my database it seems that he only played the From's gambit in the game above.)
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #39 - 07/24/06 at 12:40:59
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Yes 6...Bxd6 7.Ne4 is clearly better for White. This is perhaps a case of an assesment (=) designed to concur with the ?! given to 3.Nf3.

After Bücker's 6...Qxd6 Danish CC-GM Ove Ekebjærg in his book gives White's position preference after both 7.c3 and 7.d5 Nb4 8.Nc3.

I don't have Taylor's book, what does he prefer instead of 3.Nf3. 3.Nc3?
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #38 - 07/12/06 at 17:56:24
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a very interesting book Smiley
I'll certainly have to try the Antoshin Variation some time

one mistake I found...

in Bücker's Concealed From (1 f4 e5 2 fxe5 Nc6!?) TT (p181) gives 3 Nf3"?!" g5 4 d4 g4 5 Ng5 d5 6 exd6 Bxd6 and now 7 Ne4 as leading to equality.

but he also gives this position via 1 f4 e5 2 fxe5 d6 3 exd6 Bxd6 4 Nf3 g5 5 d4 g4 6 Ng5 Nc6 (p153) and now 7 Ne4 as good for White.

the latter assessment is correct, and Bücker's idea with the 2...Nc6 move was to play 6...Qxd6!? instead (though I think this has now been shown to be good for White as well).
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #37 - 02/09/06 at 16:10:24
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You are right, I should not call that solid.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #36 - 02/09/06 at 03:08:48
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I thought the fun line against 1...f5 looked like 2. e4, ending up with a reversed From's where White's extra tempo is his pawn on f4.  You might say some nice things about Black's position in that case, but "solid" is not one of them.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #35 - 02/08/06 at 18:15:58
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Another unclear recommendation I find 1 f4 f5 2 b3 b6 3 Bb2 Bb7 4 e3 e6!? 5 Qh5!, weakening the black squares as Taylor states. I presume the game would continue with 5 .. g6 6 Qe2 (where else?) Nf6. The only reasonable development I then see for white is to continue with Nf3, g3 and Bg2. Leaving black in a symetrical position with a tempo ahead. It looks to me that 1 .. f5 is quite solid.

  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #34 - 02/08/06 at 12:00:55
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JN wrote on 02/08/06 at 09:46:03:
White can also play 6.Qe2! and if 6.- Nc6 7.c3 0-0-0 8.d4 and white was superior in Snetlage - Fellbecker, Corr. 1969.


Yes, but instead of 7...0-0-0, Black can certainly improve with 7...Nf6 and Black really has counterplay.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #33 - 02/08/06 at 09:46:03
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Quote:
It seems to me that white is under a lot of pressure after for instance :

1 f4 e5 2 fxe5 d6 3 exd6 Bxd6 4 Nf3 Bg4 5 e4 Qe7 6 Nc3 f5 7 d3.  


Yes. 7.Qe2 is much better!

White can also play 6.Qe2! and if 6.- Nc6 7.c3 0-0-0 8.d4 and white was superior in Snetlage - Fellbecker, Corr. 1969.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #32 - 02/08/06 at 00:33:28
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Against Bg4, I can easily imagine That Tim Taylor would give back the pawn and play :


1 f4 e5 2 fxe5 d6 3 exd6 Bxd6 4 Nf3 Bg4 5 e4 Qe7 6.Be2!? Qxe4  7.Nc3 Qe7  8.0-0  with a very slight edge for white with no risk. That's the kind of variation he proposed against 4...Nf6

But I agree with Black widow, I don't see why Bg4 is a poor move...
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #31 - 02/07/06 at 18:20:16
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It looks premature to me to call 4 .. Bg4 poor without some analysis. It seems to me that white is under a lot of pressure after for instance :

1 f4 e5 2 fxe5 d6 3 exd6 Bxd6 4 Nf3 Bg4 5 e4 Qe7 6 Nc3 f5 7 d3.

So is this the variation for white to aim for?
And how should white get rid of the pressure?
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #30 - 02/07/06 at 18:14:00
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I was also quite surprised that Taylor doesn't say anything about ...Fg4 in the From gambit. But I think that the part on the From is not the best chapter in Tim Taylor's book  Wink

ref HgMan : Concerning 1.f4 d6, I usually play 2.Cc3 or 2.e4 because I think it's better to wait a little before moving the Ng1.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #29 - 02/07/06 at 13:50:37
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As it happens, I've stumbled into this on the Black side, but from a different move order: 1 f4 d6 2 Nf3 Bg4 3 e3 e5 4 fxe5 Nc6, where I presume White's best is to play 5 exd6.  In practice, as with many Froms, results are uneven, and Black seems to have some chances...
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #28 - 02/07/06 at 08:22:08
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Nope. Taylor doesn't deal with the poor 4. - Bg4. White's best reply is probably 5. e4 (5. e3 is also ok for white).
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #27 - 02/06/06 at 22:13:18
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Does Tim Taylor offer anything on the From line:

1 f4 e5 2 fxe5 d6 3 exd6 Bxd6 4 Nf3 Bg4 ?

I suppose it's less common, but how does Black fare?
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #26 - 02/04/06 at 17:53:35
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HgMan wrote on 02/04/06 at 14:18:51:
Does 1 ... c5 actually pose objective problems for White, or does it present a psychological problem insofar as White doesn't have to fight for e4 ?  The Dutch is built around not having easy access to e5, so I wonder if the Bird becomes difficult if that struggle doesn't present itself?

But I can't bring myself to think that 1 ... c5 is all that dangerous...


(According to Taylor), if you play a typical Bird's set-up against ...c5 then you're conceding Black equality right away, and might get in trouble if you keep trying to "achieve" the e4 push.  When you finally do that, you'll likely be in some Sicilian variation a tempo down. 

If you want to play psychologically as White, he suggests a Stonewall set-up against the would-be Sicilian player.  Theoretically again just equal, but you'll probably be a lot more comfortable with the arising positions than Mr. 1...c5. 

Lucky me:  I frequently play the Stonewall as Black, and frequently, too, the Closed Sicilian as White.  I can't say 1...c5 worries me on any level.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #25 - 02/04/06 at 17:27:59
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Who said it is "dangerous" for White??  THe point I was trying to make is that you thought it ridiculous that this positions rising from 1.f4 c5 could end up in a Grand Prix Sicilian.  I have plenty of experience and I am glad that others in this forum state that after 1.f4 c5 it is likely that White and Black end up playing in Sicilian type positions and/or Grand Prix formations.  Now it is even on a book.
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #24 - 02/04/06 at 14:18:51
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Does 1 ... c5 actually pose objective problems for White, or does it present a psychological problem insofar as White doesn't have to fight for e4 ?  The Dutch is built around not having easy access to e5, so I wonder if the Bird becomes difficult if that struggle doesn't present itself?

But I can't bring myself to think that 1 ... c5 is all that dangerous...
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #23 - 02/04/06 at 07:46:16
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MNb: "Maybe White's setup is better without the knight on c3".

Tim Taylor seems to agree. He discusses three games here - a few taste bites:

Larsen-Olafsson, Reykjsvik 1995: 1. e4 c5 2. f4 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. Be2 Nc6 5. 0-0 d6 6. d3 Nf6 7. Kh1 Rb8 8. Nc3 (Taylor: With the b-pawn about to rush forward I would prefer 8. c3 b5 9. Nbd2 with an edge for White.)

Campora-Herrera, Malaga 1999: 1. e4 c5 2. f4 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. Be2 Nc6 5. 0-0 d6 6. c3 e6 7. Kh1 Nge7 8. d4

Drazic-Fabiano, Catania 1990: 1. f4 g6 2. Nf3 Bg7 4. e4 c5 4. Be2 Nc6 5. c3 d5?! 6. d3 Nf6 (or dxe4 dxe4 Qxd1..., Bjerring - Velasco, Linares 2003) or e6, f.ex 7. 0-0 Nge7 83 0-0 9. Qe1 Rb8 10. Nc2 b6 11. e5 h6 12. d4 c4 13. g4, Bhend-Loetscher, Baden 1998)) 7. e5 Ng8 8. Na3 h5 9. Nc2 Nh6 10. Be3 b6 11. d4

  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #22 - 02/04/06 at 06:16:34
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I have written the following in other posts, namely creating a repertoire and in Bird repertoire.

"vs 1.f4

I suggest 1...c5 or 1...d5 I play both. With 1...c5 expect the game to turn into a grand prix sicilian or a closed sicilian and both are fine for Black since I dont know that white may have anything more promising for him.

With 1....d5 Expect a dutch with colors reversed and study accordingly, but pay very close attention to move orders. I can explain this more later if you are interested.

Personally I have a taste for 1... c5 and 1... d5. With 1... c5 Black can hope for play to transpose in some cases to a Grand Prix version of the Sicilian. In other cases, he will be able to play a botvinnik set up ( english) with colors reversed, another solid choice. --- In response to this, HgMan wrote, In response to Bladez, playing 1 ... c5 and hoping for a Grand Prix is ridiculous: why would White play 1 f4 in order to play an inferior Sicilian? When an opponent is faced with this OTB, the Bird can present some unsettling problems, and it's been my experience that Fritz and other engines tend to overestimate Black's chances (which has proved to provide some nice results in correspondence chess)"
So  it is really nice to see that in books and in this forum, other people are stating they know about this fact (since it was never just an opinion)."

Angry
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #21 - 02/04/06 at 03:28:10
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I have looked at 1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.f4 g6 4.Nf3 Bg7 5.Be2. White hopes to play an Iljin-Zjenevsky with two extra tempi, but I am not convinced: d6 6.d3 e6 7.o-o Nge7 8.Qe1 o-o 9.Bd1 Nd4 and Black is OK - maybe even a little better. Maybe White's setup is better without the knight on c3; 1.f4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d3 g6 4.e4 Bg7 5.Be2 etc.
Still I believe that the Leningrad again is more flexible: 1.f4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.e4 (or 5.d3 first) leaves White the choice of a Closed Sicilian and the plan c3/d2-(d3-)d4 conquering the centre. If am correct, this is called the Big Clamp.
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #20 - 02/03/06 at 14:34:58
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Hello,

I am mostly interested in this from the black point of view.

"10--16 pages on 1...c5.  Taylor says that White only try against this is to play an early e4.  If White plays in more normal Bird style, then it takes him two moves to get a pawn to e4, which puts him a tempo down on a lot of Sicilian lines.  Essentially, if White wants an advantage, he can't play a Bird's.  For the sake of the repetorie, Taylor talks about a little-know Sicilian line with e4, Nf3, and Be2, a kind of Grand Prix where White's KB stays at home. "

whilst it might be little known nowdays, people of my generation know of a certain Larsen v Fischer game. So 1..c5 still looks like a reasonable defence then?

Have also tried out in several games what is called in book the receip, and have not found it as easy to get an equal game as I expected. The good thing about the bird, is it tests black's ability to plan. In my own games have not passed this test too well.

Bye John S
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #19 - 02/02/06 at 22:58:53
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Jeez, I thought I was guilty of jumping about with my openings ... but, basqueknight, you really take the biscuit!  Wink
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #18 - 02/02/06 at 13:51:35
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I have picked up this book!

Its a great source of information and i must say its refreshing knowing that you dont have to face a caro-kann! I fear the Caro-more than a sicilian! I know im crazy.

The bird seems like a nice place to start with looking at newer opening ideas. I used to play the Lenigrad bird but didnt know any of the theory! I just played for an early e4 and i got it alot and crushed my opponents! Why did i stop playing it? I dont know!

But now im back to it and am very excited to be a bird player. 1.F4!

How long will i stick with it? Im not sure but hopefully my mind can stay focused for a while!

If there is any doubt in your mind about the book being worth the money i would say yes a long with all the rest of its supporters here. Good luck with the bird


Basqueknight
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #17 - 02/01/06 at 04:01:07
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Aren't you contradicting yourself, as you stated that 7.c3 leads to a drawish endgame?
Please note, that I don't claim a White advantage after 1.f4.

What about 7.Qe1 d4 8.e4 dxe3 9.Nc3!? It will be about equal of course, but it also will be a long game yet.
The same is true for Taylor's 7.Nc3 line. After 13.Ne3 White threatens to play 14.f5 - agreed, it is not a scaring threat - while 13...e6 is a bit ugly.
In the 7.c3 your idea 13.e6 indeed looks interesting too.

I stick to my opinion, that White cannot prove an advantage, if Black knows how to conduct his defence, but still can create winning chances.
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #16 - 01/31/06 at 12:45:50
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Quote:
Black's main idea in the Leningrad Dutch is to get a favourable KID position with e7-e5. So with colours reversed: instead of 7.c3 I would prefer 7.Qe1 or 7.Nc3 first!


Both 7.Qe1 and 7.Nc3 should be met by 7.- d4 leading to easy equality after:

7.Qe1 d4 7.e4 (what else?) de3 8.Be3 Ng4 =; 8.Qe3 c4! as in Pelikan-Eliskases, San Nicolas 1957.

7.Nc3 d4 8.Ne4 Qb6 9.Nf6 Bf6 10.e4 de3 11.Ne5 Nc6 12.Nc4 Qc7 13.Ne3 with equality according to Taylor.

Surprisingly enough, 7.c3 is actually more "imbalanced" than the other two tries  Smiley
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #15 - 01/31/06 at 10:53:34
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Well, I am a simple guy and prefer straightforward chess. Black's main idea in the Leningrad Dutch is to get a favourable KID position with e7-e5. So with colours reversed: instead of 7.c3 I would prefer 7.Qe1 or 7.Nc3 first! The first might be the most flexible.
Generally speaking I think the queen should be on e1 (in the Dutch: on e8) before playing e2-(e3)-e4. We do not play positionally risky stuff like 1.f4 and 2...f5, only to exchange queens withing 10 moves, do we? Even though Williams recommends this in a couple of lines in his book on the Classical Dutch.
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #14 - 01/31/06 at 07:52:33
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Quote:
Anything on 7 Qe1 and 8 a4 ?


No.

Quote:
The main issue is then, how to imbalance the position. I feel, without having concrete evidence, that the Leningrad Bird is more suitable for this goal.


Taylor apparently believes that Black can more or less force a drawish ending if White plays the Leningrad Bird. The way to do it is to follow in the footsteps of Schandorff as in the game Danielsen-Schandorff, Reykjavik 2001:

1.f4 d5 2.Nf3 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 Nf6 5.0-0 0-0 6.d3 c5 7.c3 b6!? 8.e4 de4 9.de4 Ba6 10.Re1 Qd1 11.Rd1 Nc6 12.e5 Ng4 etc.

I tend to agree with him although I think that I have found a possible improvement for White (13.e6 looks better than Danielsen's 13.Ng5). Still, the position is not that imbalanced. Moreover, 7.- Nc6 is also a good move. So what should White do? Perhaps not 7.c3... Any suggestions?
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #13 - 01/31/06 at 03:17:59
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"is the Classical Dutch a counter-striking system that white - having the first move - doesn't need to use"
I think this is the case. After 1.d4 e6 2.c4 f5 etc White striving for a safe game very often results in Black taking over the initiative.
After 1.f4 d5 2.Nf3 and 3.e3 etc. Black may confine himself with neutralizing White's initiative.
But as 1.d4 and 1.e4 allow Black to equalize as well imo, this might not really be an objection. The main issue is then, how to imbalance the position. I feel, without having concrete evidence, that the Leningrad Bird is more suitable for this goal. But please feel free to disagree.
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #12 - 01/30/06 at 23:30:57
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That sounds like a copout.  And besides, that doesn't even follow the line I was curious about.  7 a4 and 7 Qe1 can be transposed, of course, but I'm not crazy about the intermediate 8 Na3.  Anything on 7 Qe1 and 8 a4 ?
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #11 - 01/30/06 at 14:39:41
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He refers to the game Wheatley-Cobb, Swansea 1999:

1.f4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.d3 d5 4.e3 Bg7 5.Be2 0-0 6.0-0 c5 7.a4 Nc6 8.Na3 b6 9. Qe1 etc. and concludes later that "this is definately worth further study".
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #10 - 01/30/06 at 14:06:04
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I will need to put in an order for Taylor's book, but in the meantime and following on from MNb's and JN's discussions, I'd be interested to pursue Taylor's contempt for 7 Qe1, which I tend to prefer.  In recent games, I've played 7 Qe1 followed by 8 a4, using the extra tempo to claim space on the queenside and put the Queen on a more flexible square.  I wouldn't pretend to assume that this guarantees a strong advantage, but I'm a little surprised by Taylor's dismissal of it, especially since I've always managed to cling to some kind of an advantage.  Does Taylor provide any analysis to go with 7 Qe1 ?  And does he refer to 8 a4 ?
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #9 - 01/30/06 at 08:13:16
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MNb wrote:

Quote:
1.f4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.d3 d5 4.e3 Bg7 5.Be2 0-0 6.0-0 c5 7.Nc3 e6 should be met by 8.Qe1 first and only then 9.e4.  
That's how Black plays it in the Iljin-Zjenevsky of the Classical Dutch.
Also 7.Qe1 might be more precise than 7.Nc3 first, but I am not sure. In the IZ it is, but in the Bird of course the question is how White's extra tempo works out.
The comments in this thread tempt me to buy Taylor's book.


8.Qe1 or 8.e4 is probably just a matter of taste. If 8.Qe1 a possible line could be Nc6 9. e4 d4 10.Nd1 b5 12.a4 which seems to be ok for both parts. If 8.e4 a possible line could be d4 9. Nb1 Nc6 10.c3 which also seems to be ok for both.

7.Qe1 is not good according to Taylor. He concludes (page 49) "7.Qe1 cannot be recommended, despite the big names with whom it is linked. It is simply too early to commit the queen, and we see Black equalize very smoothly, or even emerge ahead. One should especially note Game 12 (T. Taylor-A.Kretchetov, Los Angeles 2004), where the extra tempo hurts White!"
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #8 - 01/29/06 at 16:03:22
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HgMan - OK, you're probably right, not terribly critical, however MNb did write in a reply to your "Is it a dead Bird?" - thread:

"Though I love the Iljin-Zjenevsky, I think e3 systems in the Bird are to passive for White. As Mednis once put it: White should play as White, Black as Black!"

And that's the sort of issue I want to discuss:
1) is the Classical Dutch a counter-striking system that white - having the first move - doesn't need to use,
2) or are playing a decent opening (dutch) with an extra move + the advantage of playing the same system as white and black more important factors?

On the same topic and more, see Simon Willams' comments on page 47-48 in this thread:
http://www.chesscenter.com/kingpin/Kingpin/37kp07.PDF





  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #7 - 01/29/06 at 15:02:32
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Funny: I don't recall MNb being terribly critical of the Bird at all...
  

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Knut S.
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #6 - 01/29/06 at 08:49:54
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"MNb: The comments in this thread tempt me to buy Taylor's book."

That's an interesting develpment. I've seen a lot of very good comments from you on the IZ/Classical Dutch, but as far as I can remember you (and many others) have been quite sceptical of the Bird's.

I don't really see why, and particuarly for someone who plays dutch as black. In the majority of games, black answers d5 and a reversed dutch with an extra move for white follows. Admittedly, that move might not mean too much in many variations, but I'd rather have it than not. And playing the Classical Dutch as black, I am familiar with many of the strategies / ideas. I think this is what the MBA and advertising people call "synergies". And although other openings might be slightly better at securing white +=, deep knowledge / experience should more than compensate at the non-professional level.

I also like the fact that the Bird's is less analysed / played by GMs than many other openings. That leaves amateurs with a bit of exploring to do, which can be a goal along with getting good tournament results.

So MNb, are you coming around to the same sort of views? Or are you just getting the book for ideas in the IZ?
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #5 - 01/29/06 at 00:15:57
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I also have Tim Taylor's book.

In my point of view, this book is clearly the best I've read on the Bird's opening, and by far. I think that the best point of the book is that the author knows what he is talking about, as he is a regular Bird player.

But I also think that many lines are missing. For example, there is only one game dealing with the line 1.f4 d5  2.Cf3 Cf6  3.e3 Cc6. yet this line is the most frequent of bird all variations. Taylor considers this line as dubious, but gives no way to obtain an edge with white ! I am quite confused.

Another strange point : the Bird database of Mr Taylor seems to be really small, as he often say : this line needs practical testing. But in my database, (big Bird Powerbase) these lines have already been tested !

I also don't understand white the author gives a whole chapter on the line 1.f4 e5  2.fxe5 d6  3.exd6 Fxd6  4.Cf3 Cf6  5.d4 Cg4. Yes this variation is quite complicated but it doesn't occur too often, one game was clearly enough.

And these are only a few examples of strange or missing points in the book.But as I've already said, I think that this book is the best on the Bird, so all Bird's players should buy it ! Cheesy
  
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MNb
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #4 - 01/28/06 at 21:08:44
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1.f4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.d3 d5 4.e3 Bg7 5.Be2 0-0 6.0-0 c5 7.Nc3 e6 should be met by 8.Qe1 first and only then 9.e4.
That's how Black plays it in the Iljin-Zjenevsky of the Classical Dutch.
Also 7.Qe1 might be more precise than 7.Nc3 first, but I am not sure. In the IZ it is, but in the Bird of course the question is how White's extra tempo works out.
The comments in this thread tempt me to buy Taylor's book.
  

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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #3 - 01/28/06 at 20:03:26
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Taylor doesn't spend a lot of time on Pirc-style setups.  He recommends a system with e2-e4, d2-d3, and Be2, and gives the game T. Taylor-G. Fritchle, Burbank 2004 as his example.  He doesn't mention 1...d6 specifically at all. 

Actually, he uses his own games a lot in this book.  That might be a fault.  Sometimes he gives one of his own exciting games even though its theoretically unimportant.  On the other hand, there's not a lot of Bird theory out there, so using your own games is a lot more forgiveable.  Also, the annotations of his own games are fun--lots of atmosphere and situation-setting.

  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #2 - 01/28/06 at 11:12:41
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I have also bought Taylor’s book on the Bird. I agree with bravehoptoad that this is an excellent piece of work. Taylor has done a very nice job explaining the Bird and its various setups. So far, my only quibble with the book is that it doesn’t deal with the various black French setups. For instance, in the line1.f4 Nf6 2.Nf3 g6 3.d3 d5 4.e3 Bg7 5.Be2 0-0 6.0-0 c5 7.Nc3 Taylor only examines 7.- d4 and 7.- Bf5. However, I regularly face 7.– e6 (and similar French setups) when playing blitz games at ICC. I guess that white should proceed with the e4-plan and play 8.e4 d4 9.Nb1 intending Nbd2-c4. It would have been nice if Taylor would have included a little on how to meet the typical black French setups. Otherwise, as I started saying, it is a very good book. I definitely recommend it.
  
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Re: Tim Taylor's Bird book
Reply #1 - 01/27/06 at 20:00:00
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Thanks for the update!  What does Taylor say about 1 ... d6 ?

I've been playing the Classical Bird recently, so am pleased to learn that Taylor likes it, but I've been starting to look at the Antoshin as well.  All in all, it sounds like the book might be worth the investment...
  

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Tim Taylor's Bird book
01/27/06 at 04:28:21
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I just got this book and I'm having a great time working through it.  I love Tim Taylor's writing.  He's a natural as a chess annotator--lively and funny.  Where he's really good is at organizing the material.  Here's this 224 page book on the Bird, but somehow Taylor makes it seem pretty simple to play.  

It breaks down this way:

1--23 pages on the Classical Bird.  Looks like the Classical Dutch, strangely enough.  This is his favorite attempt to get a consistent edge with White against grandmaster competition, which is why he analyzes it first.

2--15 pages on the Queenside Fianchetto.  The lowdown here is that White gets a great game if Black lets White do one of two things:  1) pin his knight on c6 with Bb5, or 2) get in b4 before Black plays ...c5.  Otherwise, equality.

3--18 pages on what Taylor calls "The Recipe," which is Black's plan of 1. f4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. e3 Bg5, followed by ...Nd7, ...Bxf3, and ...e5.  This is what a lot of repetoire books recommend as an easy way to kill the Bird.  Taylor recommends 4. h3 Bxf3 5. Qxf3, followed by an almost immediate pawn storm with g4 &c.  The sample game is amazing.  He recommends Black sac a pawn with 5...e5 to combat this--another crazy game.  

4--25 pages on the Lenningrad Bird.  Play is tricky and White has a lot of good lines, but Black has a one line that leads to an equal, Queenless middle-game.

5--14 pages on the Antoshin, an attempt by White to get in e4 in one move, that involves the early moves c3, d3, Qc2, and then e4.  If it works, you've got a kind of Classical Bird with an extra tempo, but Black has several equalizing lines.

6--13 pages on the Stonewall.  A solid line, but so solid that White's extra tempo doesn't mean much, and Black can achieve easy equality.

It's great to have all this material on the Antoshin or the Stonewall, because unless Black happens to know a few critical lines, White can swing the game in his favor by suddenly switching what kind of Bird's he's playing.  Sometimes the Stonewall is a great choice.

7--21 pages on From's Gambit, Lasker Variation.  There's a lot of honest-to-god theory on the From's Gambit, unlike a lot of the lines in this book, and Taylor goes into it.  Lasker's line is the one that goes 1. f4 e5 2. fxe5 d5 3. exd6 Bd6 4. Nf3 g5.  This is just about winning for White, it turns out.

8--20 pages on From's Gambit, Mestel Variation.  This one goes 1. f4 e5 2. fxe5 d6 3. exd5 Bxd6 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. d4 Ng4.  This is one of the most complicated positions in chess.  Taylor says these variations are so strange "I have more than once, while analyzing, had the computer switch from 'winning for White' to 'winning with Black' on the same move!"  Looks like loads of fun, but if White chickens out, he can always force a draw on move 15.

9--9 pages on "Other Froms", where either side deviates.

10--16 pages on 1...c5.  Taylor says that White only try against this is to play an early e4.  If White plays in more normal Bird style, then it takes him two moves to get a pawn to e4, which puts him a tempo down on a lot of Sicilian lines.  Essentially, if White wants an advantage, he can't play a Bird's.  For the sake of the repetorie, Taylor talks about a little-know Sicilian line with e4, Nf3, and Be2, a kind of Grand Prix where White's KB stays at home.  

11--19 pages on "other".  Against 1...b6 he gives 2. e4, 3. d3, and 4. Nf3, recommending from there an Antoshin set-up.  Against the King's Indian, 2. Nf3, 3. b4.  He spends a lot of time on 1...f5, going over several different plans:  fianchettoing the Queen Bishop, 2. e4!?, and 2. g3.  

Well--I play the Dutch as Black, so something about these Bird lines seems easy to grasp.  I can see it being a nice alternative to my usual 1. e4, particularly against booked-up opponents.  I can't wait to whip this sucker out at my next Blitz tournament.
  
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