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Normal Topic The Fianchetto Kings Indian (Read 3872 times)
Holbox
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Re: The Fianchetto Kings Indian
Reply #6 - 05/03/06 at 07:38:44
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An interesting option is the Simagin Variation. I have known about it by reading Best Lessons of a Chess Coach by Sunil Weeramantry & Ed Eusebi

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0812922654/002-4258746-3400863?v=glance&n=28315...

In the book appears this game comented in extent by Weeramantry:

[Event "Blitz:15'"]
[Site "Somerset, NJ"]
[Date "1992.??.??"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "?"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "L Pugh"]
[Black "Sunil Weeramantry"]
[ECO "E62"]
[WhiteElo "?"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "62"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. g3 O-O 5. Bg2 d6 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. O-O Bg4 8. h3
Bxf3 9. Bxf3 Nd7 10. e3 e5 11. Ne2 f5 12. c5 e4 13. Bg2 dxc5 14. Qb3+ Kh8 15.
Qxb7 Nb4 16. Qb5 Rb8 17. Qc4 Nd3 18. Qc2 Qe7 19. a3 Rfc8 20. Rb1 cxd4 21. Nxd4
c5 22. Ne2 c4 23. Nd4 N7c5 24. Bd2 Nb3 25. Bc3 Nxd4 26. exd4 Qd6 27. Qd2 Bxd4
28. Qe3 Rd8 29. g4 Rb3 30. gxf5 Rxc3 31. Qxe4 Rc2 0-1
  

"Ladran, luego cabalgamos", NN
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iggystiv
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Re: The Fianchetto Kings Indian
Reply #5 - 03/15/06 at 08:49:40
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In Biladez's line, 8...a6 prolly leads to the most dynamic play.  Blask is gunna play ...c5, (I know, I know, but if it works...) or ...b5 or both. Black attempts push white back and breakdown white's center.  The play is complex and a strange battle ensues. Here's a look:

[Event "36th Olympiad"]
[Site "Calvia ESP"]
[Date "2004.10.17"]
[EventDate "2004.10.15"]
[Round "2"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[White "Khalifman"]
[Black "Jo Gallagher"]
[ECO "E68"]
[WhiteElo "2669"]
[BlackElo "2543"]
[PlyCount "46"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. g3 O-O 5. Bg2 d6 6. O-O Nbd7 7. Nc3 e5 8.
e4 a6 9. h3 exd4 10. Nxd4 Re8 11. Bg5 h6 12. Be3 Rb8 13. Qc1 Kh7 14. Rd1
Qe7 15. Rb1 c5 16. Nf3 b5 17. Bf4 Rb6 18. a4 b4 19. a5 Rb7 20. Nd5 Nxd5 21.
cxd5 g5 22. Be3 Ne5 23. Nxe5 1/2-1/2

[Event "Aeroflot Open B"]
[Site "Moscow RUS"]
[Date "2005.02.17"]
[EventDate "2005.02.15"]
[Round "3"]
[Result "0-1"]
[White "D Khismatullin"]
[Black "Rau Mamedov"]
[ECO "E68"]
[WhiteElo "2548"]
[BlackElo "2494"]
[PlyCount "142"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. g3 O-O 5. Bg2 d6 6. O-O Nbd7 7. Nc3 e5 8.
e4 a6 9. Re1 exd4 10. Nxd4 Re8 11. b3 Rb8 12. Bb2 Ne5 13. h3 c5 14. Nc2 Nc6
15. Qd2 Be6 16. Rad1 Qa5 17. Qc1 Rbd8 18. Qa1 Nh5 19. Ne2 Nb4 20. Nxb4 Bxb2
21. Qxb2 Qxb4 22. a3 Qb6 23. Rd2 Ng7 24. g4 h5 25. g5 Qa5 26. Nf4 b5 27. b4
Qb6 28. Nd5 Bxd5 29. cxd5 c4 30. Rde2 Rc8 31. Qc3 h4 32. Bf3 Re5 33. Kh2
Rce8 34. Qd2 Qd8 35. Bg4 f5 36. gxf6 Qxf6 37. f4 c3 38. Qc1 R5e7 39. Kg2
Qd4 40. Kf3 Nf5 41. Qc2 Qe3+ 42. Rxe3 Nd4+ 43. Kf2 Nxc2 44. e5 Nxe3 45.
Rxe3 dxe5 46. Rxc3 exf4 47. d6 Re3 48. d7 Rf8 49. Rc8 Rd3 50. Ke2 Rd4 51.
Be6+ Kg7 52. Kf3 Rd6 53. Re8 g5 54. Re7+ Kg6 55. Re8 Rf6 56. Re7 Rd4 57.
Re8 Rxe6 58. Rxe6+ Kf5 59. Re7 Rd6 60. Rh7 Ke6 61. Kg4 Rxd7 62. Rh6+ Ke5
63. Rxa6 Rd3 64. Kxg5 Rxh3 65. Ra8 f3 66. Rf8 Ke4 67. Kg4 Rg3+ 68. Kxh4 Rg7
69. Kh3 Ke3 70. Rf5 f2 71. Rf8 Ke2 0-1

[Event "Corus Chess Tournament: B Group"]
[Site "Wijk aan Zee NED"]
[Date "2005.01.28"]
[EventDate "2005.01.15"]
[Round "11"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "PH Nielsen"]
[Black "D Stellwagen"]
[ECO "E68"]
[WhiteElo "2648"]
[BlackElo "2524"]
[PlyCount "132"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. d4 d6 6. O-O Nbd7 7. Nc3 e5 8.
e4 a6 9. h3 b5 10. Qc2 c6 11. Rd1 Qe7 12. c5 dxc5 13. dxe5 Ne8 14. Bg5 f6
15. exf6 Bxf6 16. Be3 Bg7 17. e5 Nxe5 18. Nxe5 Qxe5 19. Bxc6 Bf5 20. Qb3+
c4 21. Qa3 Rc8 22. Bf4 Qf6 23. Nd5 Qxb2 24. Ne7+ Kh8 25. Qxb2 Bxb2 26. Nxc8
Bxa1 27. Rxa1 Bxc8 28. a4 bxa4 29. Be5+ Ng7 30. Rxa4 h5 31. h4 Kh7 32. Rxc4
Rf7 33. Rd4 Bb7 34. Ba4 Bf3 35. Rd3 Re7 36. Bc3 Bb7 37. f4 Be4 38. Rd8 Rb7
39. Be5 Rb4 40. Bd1 Rb7 41. Be2 Re7 42. Bxa6 Bf5 43. Bb5 Be6 44. Kf2 Rb7
45. Bc6 Ra7 46. Rb8 Re7 47. Ke3 Ra7 48. Kd4 Rf7 49. Kc5 Re7 50. Be4 Ra7 51.
Kd6 Rd7+ 52. Kc6 Ra7 53. Kc5 Rd7 54. Ra8 Re7 55. Bc6 Bf7 56. Kb6 Be8 57.
Bd5 Bf7 58. Bxf7 Rxf7 59. Kc6 Re7 60. Rf8 Ra7 61. Bf6 Rc7+ 62. Kxc7 Ne6+
63. Kd6 Nxf8 64. Ke7 Kg8 65. Bg5 Nh7 66. Bh6 1-0


I don't know if these games are the best illustration of the lines, but it might be a good start.



  
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BladezII
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Re: The Fianchetto Kings Indian
Reply #4 - 03/15/06 at 03:53:12
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From one of my games

1. d4 Nf6
2. c4 g6
3. Nc3  Bg7
4. Nf3  d6
5. g3 O-O
6. Bg2 Nbd7
7. O-O e5
8. e4 c6

This is one of the most reliable systems vs the fianchetto

9.Rb1 exd4
10. Nxd4 a5
11. Re1 Re8
12. b3

and this is one of the toughest set ups to crack for White and dangerous for the less creative Black players or those playing with low energy levels.  Since if we do not bother White at all or White manages to build or improve his position w/out trouble he can squeeze Black to death.

12.....      Nc5
13. h3 h6
14. Bb2 Qb6
15. Nc2 Be6
16. Qxd6 Rad8
17. Qf4 Nd3

already a sign that Black is very much fighting

18. Qe3 Qc7
19. Nd4 Ng4
20. Nxe6 Rxe6
21. hxg4 Bd4 !

but... one can see that things will fizzle out in peace

22. Nd5 Bxe3 23. Nxc7 Bxf2+ 24. Kf1 Bxe1 25. Nxe6 fxe6 26. Rxe1 Nxb2 27. Ke2
Rd7 28. g5 hxg5 29. Bh3 Kf7  1/2--1/2

One can only win when the opponent makes a mistake.  We have to recognize that when we ask for more and more complications we are asking for trouble that can probably come to us as easy as it can go to our opponent.
I doubt it was the system you used as Black which led you to draw.  It had to do more with your opponent not making any mistakes for you to exploit more than anything.
  

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Re: The Fianchetto Kings Indian
Reply #3 - 03/14/06 at 18:05:32
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woofwoof wrote on 03/14/06 at 16:25:03:
Well, if you want something sharper, you could try the Panno or the Uhlmann's Variation. In the Uhlmann's, it is quite similar to the normal Mar del Plata. Black tries to get white to lock the ctr before playing Nd7 followed by that f5 break to get a rapid k-side attack.

Try looking at some Bronstein games as well. I remember this one game where Bronstein successfully ripped open the a-file via some sort of minority attack & penetrated white's position. I cant recall the variation played, but it was definitely against white's fianchetto.


I wouldn't say that the Uhlmann is very similar to the Mar del Plata; Black generally doesn't get the same kind of K-side attack ...

The Bronstein game you're thinking of may be Zita-Bronstein, circa 1950.  Definitely a Classical Fianchetto (i.e. ...Nbd7 plus ...e5 by Black).  Black played ...a5, ...a4 and ...axb3 (he also played ...h5 and ...h4, I believe); later he sacrificed an exchange with ...Rx(bishop)a1 and tore White asunder with dark-square based tactics.  That game and a similar Geller game from the same era were posted here a while back.  

(editing)  There was also Pachman-Bronstein, very similar to the Zita game.  Possibly that was the game posted here, instead of Zita ...all these games tend to blur together in my memory ...     Smiley
  
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Re: The Fianchetto Kings Indian
Reply #2 - 03/14/06 at 16:25:03
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Well, if you want something sharper, you could try the Panno or the Uhlmann's Variation. In the Uhlmann's, it is quite similar to the normal Mar del Plata. Black tries to get white to lock the ctr before playing Nd7 followed by that f5 break to get a rapid k-side attack.

Try looking at some Bronstein games as well. I remember this one game where Bronstein successfully ripped open the a-file via some sort of minority attack & penetrated white's position. I cant recall the variation played, but it was definitely against white's fianchetto.
  

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Re: The Fianchetto Kings Indian
Reply #1 - 03/02/06 at 15:07:26
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Gallagher has a nice variation in his book (involving a backward d-pawn and queenside pressure). You could also consider transposing to the Grunfeld. That way the position is much more open.
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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DarMc2
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The Fianchetto Kings Indian
03/02/06 at 13:32:34
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Okay, last night i sat down to play a league match and needing to win i played aggressively so i chose the KID.Next off i was met with the Fianchetto Variation.A highly positional game took place which fizzled out to a draw.I myself,play classically and adopted a set-up of c6,Nd7,e5 etc.Anyway i was dissapointed with the draw and thought that maybe if i had a new set up, with a few more tactical ideas i might have got the point.Is there any more aggressive ideas or variations i could learn?

Cheers
  
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