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Normal Topic C11: Books on the Steinitz (Read 3808 times)
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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #9 - 08/22/06 at 11:23:56
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Thanks for the suggestions. I bought Khalifman's book and my first impression is that it's a great book!

regards,
Tom
  
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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #8 - 08/22/06 at 10:23:58
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Smyslov_Fan wrote on 08/07/06 at 15:35:56:
It seems that once again, Khalifman has written an excellent repertoire book, but forgotten that it's supposed to reflect the repertoire of a certain world-class player.  He had that problem with his Kramnik repertoire book, and now in the Anand book.  It makes me wonder why he does this.

Not really. Of course there are lines which Anand never played or where he uses another move. Anyway there are always these common problems:
-Top players usually dont have a single repertoire (possibly only Karpov to some extent)
-Anand never played that position, eg I doubt he ever met a Damiano
-Anand played the position but doesnt choose the line considered best or most critical
-Anand's line doesnt fit with the repertoire idea. Eg the lines vs the Pirc/Modern feature a quick f4, meaning that similar lines need to be treated the same way as they can transpose such as Caro-offshoots with d6.
-Khalif doesnt like an Anand line (eg the line would fit with the repertoire and is decent enough but he simply doesnt like it) and therefore chooses another, which is what happened with the Pirc.

The last of these can be criticised, though in most of these cases you get a line which is quite similar to the feel of the rest and thus in the "style" of Anand with some excellent analysis.

Plus I think you are getting a feel of how good some of the lines are in the books, judging from the game you're playing Grin
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #7 - 08/22/06 at 01:35:41
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But in this case Khalifman is advising the move Anand uses. 

Only once has Anand used a move other than 7. Be3 and that was not until after the Khalifman books on the French were published as of course Anand repertroire is constantly evolving (although I think that 7. Be3 will remain Anand's main move in this position).  I have gone over a chunk of the book and I find that it does a good job of staying pretty true to Anands most common moves.  Sure there a lot of cases where he has to make the move up because Anand has never been in that position before and in several cases where Anand has only been a position once a long time ago and played a move that is deemed inferior today it only makes sense that Khalifman would not advise the reader to use the same move.

My assessment of the two French OWATA books is that they are excellent.  I can't wait for the 3 books on the Sicilian.
  
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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #6 - 08/07/06 at 15:35:56
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It seems that once again, Khalifman has written an excellent repertoire book, but forgotten that it's supposed to reflect the repertoire of a certain world-class player.  He had that problem with his Kramnik repertoire book, and now in the Anand book.  It makes me wonder why he does this.
  
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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #5 - 08/05/06 at 04:38:39
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I recall Anand playing (e.g. at the Olympiad) 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Ne2 to be followed by 8. c3, transposing to a line of the Tarrasch.  I wonder if this is discussed in the Khalifman book?

Nope - In Opening for White According to Anand - Khalifman uses the move 7. Be3.

But, up until Anand played Ne2 a couple months ago he had played 7. Be3 every time (12 games).

The move seems to be played a lot by young Elisabeth Paehtz and Tatiana Kosintseva (altough she appears to have switched to 7. Be3 now)

  
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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #4 - 07/01/06 at 13:51:47
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I recall Anand playing (e.g. at the Olympiad) 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. e5 Nfd7 5. f4 c5 6. Nf3 Nc6 7. Ne2 to be followed by 8. c3, transposing to a line of the Tarrasch.  I wonder if this is discussed in the Khalifman book?
  
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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #3 - 07/01/06 at 10:16:26
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Steinitz variation is covered in Part 3 of "Opening for White according to Anand. Volume 6" Chessstars Ed. Khalifman.

About half of the book and 180 pages...

I have not yet read it but it seems a good coverage of the variation. And well updated. Just an example: Nijboer line with Nb3 in the Boleslavsky is explained only in this book.

But one difficulty exists: there are many variations and sub-variations, and few general explanations ; a common trend nowadays, since plans are more complex.

For old book and coverage of the Steinitz for the beginner, I always like Suetin's French Defence Ed. Batsford or the best for explanations, the chapter "Classical Center" in McDonald&Harley "Mastering the French" Batsford Ed.

Because of some long story about Batsford, maybe it will be difficult to find those books...and Batsford (Chrysalis) is now selling Psakhis's book "French Defence: Steinitz,Classical,and other systems"

  

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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #2 - 06/30/06 at 14:38:19
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Pederssen and Psakhis are also probably must-haves, too.

I remember thinking that Pederssen's book was clear and easy to follow.  For descriptive instruction, Neil McDonald's older book on the French is pretty valuable if you can find a copy...
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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Re: Books on the Steinitz
Reply #1 - 06/30/06 at 06:45:06
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Khalifman "Anand" deals with it in either part 6 or 7 (both are on the french)
http://www.chess-stars.com/ has the exact contents.
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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C11: Books on the Steinitz
06/29/06 at 19:53:23
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Which are the best books on the Steinitz variation?
I want to play the variation from the white side. My playing strength is about 1950.
Perhaps there are older books which are explaining the ideas better than the new books? Thanks for answers.

1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.e5 Line

Tom

« Last Edit: 07/31/11 at 17:07:43 by dom »  
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