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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) King's Indian Attack (Read 54680 times)
kylemeister
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #104 - 07/10/24 at 14:15:21
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(history alert)

Nernstian59 wrote on 07/06/24 at 21:25:45:
While checking on Prusikin's analysis of the KIA in his book Countering the Queen's Gambit, I noticed he uses the move order 1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 e6 4.0-0 Be7 5.d3 c5 6.Nbd2 b5 7.e4 Bb7 8.Re1 Nc6. IM Schuh, in his book review, has Black playing 6...Nc6 and then 7...b5 and 8...Bb7.

I note that the Prusikin version has been addressed via 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 b5. An ancient ECO main line is 3. Bg2 Bb7 4. 0-0 e6 5. d3 d5 6. Nbd2 Be7 7. e4 c5 8. Qe2 Nc6 9. c3 with equality according to Romanishin.`      

Nernstian59 wrote on 07/06/24 at 21:25:45:
After 9.e5 (which is marked ?!), Prusikin continues 9...Nd7 10.Nf1 a5 11.h4 h6! 12.N1h2 a4 13.a3 Qb6, which he evaluates as ⩱. (Stockfish also gives ⩱). He says at this point, "Black leaves the king in the middle or even castles queenside. He has a simple plan on the queenside, while White has a hard time generating counterplay on the other side of the board."

Oleg, back in '79, thought the position after 10...a5 was unclear.
« Last Edit: 07/10/24 at 17:10:18 by kylemeister »  
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Nernstian59
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #103 - 07/06/24 at 21:25:45
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While checking on Prusikin's analysis of the KIA in his book Countering the Queen's Gambit, I noticed he uses the move order 1.Nf3 d5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 e6 4.0-0 Be7 5.d3 c5 6.Nbd2 b5 7.e4 Bb7 8.Re1 Nc6. IM Schuh, in his book review, has Black playing 6...Nc6 and then 7...b5 and 8...Bb7.

With respect to keeping options open, after 5...c5, Prusikin comments, "...Black would like to defer castling for a long time or even not play it altogether. As a result, the assault on the kingside planned by White comes to nothing." The review by Schuh mentions delayed castling, but Prusikin's actual words go further by indicating that Black might not play the move at all.

After 9.e5 (which is marked ?!), Prusikin continues 9...Nd7 10.Nf1 a5 11.h4 h6! 12.N1h2 a4 13.a3 Qb6, which he evaluates as ⩱. (Stockfish also gives ⩱). He says at this point, "Black leaves the king in the middle or even castles queenside. He has a simple plan on the queenside, while White has a hard time generating counterplay on the other side of the board." 

I haven't previously seen this plan of keeping the Black king in the center in the KIA, but it seems to work here. It should be noted that omission of castling isn't a feature in all of Prusikin's lines. For example, after 9.exd5 Nxd5 10.Ne4, he gives 10...0-0!, saying "...now that the center is open, Black can castle safely." His comment seems to imply that White can't generate his usual formulaic attack with an open center, but I also wonder if it's now prudent to castle given that opening.
  
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kylemeister
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #102 - 07/03/24 at 11:45:04
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FreeRepublic wrote on 07/02/24 at 18:35:40:
7...b6 8. Re1 Bb7 is less explored. Black keeps his options open regarding his king.

Speaking of keeping options with the king, there is also 7...b5, which is apparently advocated in GM Michael Prusikin's QG-repertoire-for-Black book. In a review of that book, IM Dirk Schuh says that after 8. Re1 Bb7, 9. e5 is a popular error which he has faced almost every time in online blitz.

Old theory (e.g. Uhlmann in ECO and Taimanov in Königsindisch bis Altindisch) had 7...b5 as "?!" and advantageously met by 8. exd5 exd5 9. c4.
  
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FreeRepublic
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #101 - 07/02/24 at 18:35:40
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After 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. O-O Be7 5. d3 c5 6. Nbd2 Nc6 7. e4, most games and theory continues with 7...O-O. I think of this as the pinata variation. Many games have proceeded 8. Re1 b5 9. e5 Nd7 10. Nf1 a5 11. h4 with double-edged play.

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7...b6 8. Re1 Bb7 is less explored. Black keeps his options open regarding his king.

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It has been examined by theory and games and continues to be played. It's a bit murky as both sides may keep their options open for a while. While the path forward may be narrower for Black than for White, it's still an interesting option. 9. Qe2 Qc7 10. c3 h6 11. h4 a5 12. a4 Ba6 13. e5 Nd7 14. h5, and now instead of 14...0-0-0?!, the move one would want to play, 14...Bg5 may keep the balance.

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Thanks Tony for fixing this up. Somehow, I ended up with multiple posts.

Kylemeister, I'll look at ...b5 when I get the chance.
« Last Edit: 07/03/24 at 17:08:28 by FreeRepublic »  
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kylemeister
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #100 - 06/27/24 at 17:20:05
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cathexis wrote on 06/27/24 at 13:24:30:
Magnus as white playing A05 got crushed the other day by Alex Grischuk. It was a blitz game. See here:

He deserves it for playing such an ugly e3 thing.

Smiley
  
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kylemeister
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #99 - 06/27/24 at 17:00:01
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FreeRepublic wrote on 06/27/24 at 13:08:55:
It is also recommended by GM Lysy at Modern-Chess.

"Our general idea is to play Bc5 and Qe7 with a comfortable position due to the passive bishop g2."

So Black is basically playing an old book line (from 1. e4 e6 2. d3) but "sacrificing" a tempo with his KB. (An example of the old version is Vasiukov-Tal, USSR ch 1961. As I recall, Tal annotated part of that game in his "Life and Games" book.)
  
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cathexis
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #98 - 06/27/24 at 13:24:30
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Perhaps a bit off-topic, but FWIW,

Magnus as white playing A05 got crushed the other day by Alex Grischuk. It was a blitz game. See here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EHLYY7rAEw

Cathexis/Andrew
  
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FreeRepublic
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #97 - 06/27/24 at 13:08:55
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Another sideline commences with 6...Nc6

(1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. O-O Be7 5. d3 O-O 6. Nbd2 Nc6)

ChessPub: "was another Aronian favourite analyzed in Rapport-Aronian in the Archives. Black  to occupy the centre with 7...e5."

It is also recommended by GM Lysy at Modern-Chess.
https://www.modern-chess.com/setups-with-g2-g3-universal-solution-for-black-part...

He says:

"Over the years, I have responded with 5...0-0, 6...c5, and 7...Nc6, achieving excellent positions but poor results. Two years ago, I took note of Nakamura's games after 6...Nc6, with the idea of placing the black pawn on e5."

There is a sample chapter that covers this, at least in part.
  
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FreeRepublic
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #96 - 06/27/24 at 12:52:20
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kylemeister wrote on 06/27/24 at 03:55:19:
1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. 0-0 Be7 5. d3 0-0 6. Nbd2 a5. But perhaps unsurprisingly it has appeared in Chess Publishing.

Since you mentioned it, I found it also in ChessPublishing. It's easy to miss, not ECO C00, not A08, but A07.

I agree with MartinC:
"you want to see how white is going to react on the queenside, then you can arrange your Q-side play in response."

CP A (A07) David Cummings:  "This move has become quite topical in recent high-level events. It has been championed by Levon Aronian who introduced it to elite chess in his 2016 Candidates encounter with Sergey Karjakin. Play often transposes to standard King's Indian Attack patterns, but the early ...a5-a4 limits White's flexibility in some move orders."
  
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #95 - 06/27/24 at 08:20:51
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I've looked at that in the related French positions.

Also unsurprisingly it's something the Neural Net engines like Smiley But it does make sense - you want to see how white is going to react on the queenside, then you can arrange your Q-side play in response.

I have no idea how it goes if white goes for c4 rather than e4. I suppose then you're mostly discouraging b3 ideas and asking what else white is going to do to develop!
  
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #94 - 06/27/24 at 03:55:19
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Here's something I didn't recall seeing before: 1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. 0-0 Be7 5. d3 0-0 6. Nbd2 a5. But perhaps unsurprisingly it has appeared in Chess Publishing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRKDvXavxAY
  
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FreeRepublic
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #93 - 06/24/24 at 20:22:42
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Here's another variation in this complex:

1. Nf3 d5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 e6 4. O-O c5 5. d4!? cd4 6. Nd4 e5

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It's been played by strong players from Polugaevsky-Korchnoi 1977 to Gelfand-Keymer 2023. Yet as far as I know it does not have a name, and games can be found under various ECO codes.
  
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Nernstian59
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #92 - 06/13/24 at 22:25:32
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kylemeister wrote on 06/12/24 at 14:40:10:
I don't know if the comment on overprotection appeared in the two editions of Flank Openings which preceded it (1967 and 1970).

I only have the third edition from 1979, so I'm afraid I can't say if that overprotection comment is in earlier editions.

Although I haven't looked at that book in ages, Keene's comment from Becoming a Grandmaster sounds familiar - perhaps because the advice that one can improve by studying the games of one's "chess hero" has been repeated on many occasions.
  
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kylemeister
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #91 - 06/12/24 at 14:40:10
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Nernstian59 wrote on 06/09/24 at 22:41:25:
Finally, I wonder if Keene's comment on overprotection was due to a heightened awareness stemming from writing his Nimzowitsch biography. Incidentally, that book, Aron Nimzowitsch - A Reappraisal, was my first exposure to "The Immortal Overprotection Game".

I too thought of that book, which is 50 years old this year. I don't know if the comment on overprotection appeared in the two editions of Flank Openings which preceded it (1967 and 1970).

In Becoming a Grandmaster (1977), Keene wrote that "I had turned the literary skills acquired at Cambridge towards a 'Reappraisal' of my chess hero, 'Aron Nimzowitsch' and the end of 1972 and much of 1973 was spent in contemplation of his games in preparation for the relevant volume. Several masters have observed a marked upswing in their own play after a deep study of a great predecessor. Kotov was another example. He made great strides after his book on Alekhine, and this kind of creative examination is certainly a course I can recommend to any aspiring GM."
  
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Nernstian59
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Re: King's Indian Attack
Reply #90 - 06/09/24 at 22:41:25
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kylemeister - Thanks for the historical tidbits. A database search supports your impression that ...Ne8 never really caught on. It's only been played occasionally over the years, with Tringov- Lee being among the first examples. Perhaps it's because the move never had a prominent supporter who played it regularly. The search showed ...Ne8 being adopted a couple times each by Sveshnikov and Karjakin, but that's about it. In his book, Lakdawala stated that ...Ne8 is a specialty of German GM Klaus Bischoff, and he has played it close to a half dozen times. 

One of the more recent games found in the search was V.Pranav-D.Dubov, Titled Tuesday Blitz 13.09.2022, where Dubov executed the transfer of the knight from e8 to f5. Maybe it's a sign of Russian chess culture that a top young player is aware of the idea behind the rather obscure ...Ne8.

Finally, I wonder if Keene's comment on overprotection was due to a heightened awareness stemming from writing his Nimzowitsch biography. Incidentally, that book, Aron Nimzowitsch - A Reappraisal, was my first exposure to "The Immortal Overprotection Game".
« Last Edit: 06/10/24 at 00:54:17 by Nernstian59 »  
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