Latest Updates:
Normal Topic Grunfeld Rb1 question for Cox (Read 2784 times)
Viking
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 673
Location: Norway
Joined: 10/12/04
Gender: Male
Re: Grunfeld Rb1 question for Cox
Reply #6 - 09/02/07 at 21:33:12
Post Tools
Ok, thanks.

Will have to look into some of his games then...
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Nightlamp
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 23
Joined: 02/19/07
Re: Grunfeld Rb1 question for Cox
Reply #5 - 09/02/07 at 19:17:06
Post Tools
I'm sorry... It's not a familiar name, it was proposed in the CBM article i read as a name for the variation because Kruppa plays it a lot
the moves:
d4 Nf6
c4 g6
Nc3 d5
cxd5 Bxd5
e4 Nxc3
bxc3 Bg7
Bg5
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Viking
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 673
Location: Norway
Joined: 10/12/04
Gender: Male
Re: Grunfeld Rb1 question for Cox
Reply #4 - 09/02/07 at 18:50:00
Post Tools
ehhm  Embarrassed
What is the "Kruppa" variation?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Nightlamp
YaBB Newbies
*
Offline


I Love ChessPublishing!

Posts: 23
Joined: 02/19/07
Re: Grunfeld Rb1 question for Cox
Reply #3 - 09/02/07 at 14:51:09
Post Tools
Hi,

I recently bought the book from Mr. Cox. I like it very much to start playing d4 followed by 2.c4, but some of the variations don't suit me very much. The Grunfeld is one of them, and I'm planning to play the Kruppa variation. This is an unexplored variation with quite some possibilities for white, i think.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
cma6
Full Member
***
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 167
Location: US
Joined: 07/17/04
Grunfeld Rb1 sources?
Reply #2 - 09/01/07 at 14:23:49
Post Tools
As an offshoot of your question, I have been looking for resources for White in the Gruenfeld in this line of D85
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Rb1 0-0 9. Be2 cxd4 10. cxd4 Qa5+ 11. Bd2 Qxa2 12. 0-0 Bg4 which I saw in  Gelfand-Shirov, Pivdenny Bank Chess Rapid.

  Can anyone recommend good sources (books or online) for White to get up to speed on this main line of the Gruenfeld with White playing Rb1 and Nf3 and Be2 and Rb1?

In the Gelfand-Shirov game, there followed 13 Be3, Nc6; 14 d5, Na5; 15 Bg5, b6 (or Qa6.)
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
micawber
God Member
*****
Offline


like many sneaks and skunks
in history he's a poet

Posts: 852
Location: Netherlands
Joined: 09/07/05
Gender: Male
Re: Grunfeld Rb1 question for Cox
Reply #1 - 04/12/07 at 21:24:33
Post Tools
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Rb1 0-0 9. Be2 cxd4 10. cxd4 Qa5+ 11. Bd2 Qxa2 12. 0-0 Bg4. 13. Rxb7 Bxf3 14. Bxf3 Bxd4 15. Bb4

rn3rk1/pR2pp1p/6p1/8/1B1bP3/5B2/q4PPP/3Q1RK1 b - -


15....Rd8 16.Qc1,e5

@Kevinludwig, I agree with your improvement on the Cox-line.
White's task is very difficult. Perhaps 21.Bd1 could be replaced with 21.Qc1 with the intent of swapping queens, but even then white's endgame advantage seems tiny.

Remark 1
Besides I would like to draw the attention to the fact that black has several similar sidelines
15......... Nc6 !?   (instead of 15...Rd8)
16.Bxe7, Rab8
(16....,Rfe8 17.Bg5 gives white some advantage (Wojtachek-Schmid, Warsaw 2006, 1-0)
17.Rc7, Nxe7
18.Qd4, Qe6
19.Qxe7           With some endgame-advantage for white but drawn
(Wotjachek-Krasenkov, Lubniewice 2005)


Remark 2

15.Bb4 , Rd8
16.Qc1 , Na6!?  (instead of 16....,e5)
untried as far as I know: with the idea
17.Bxe7, Rac8
18.Qb1  ,Qxb1

2rr2k1/pR2Bp1p/n5p1/8/3bP3/5B2/5PPP/1q3RK1 w - -



Black seems close to equality after both:
19.R1xb1,Nc5 and 19.R7xb1,Re8 (with Nc5 to follow)



[center] [img]http://www.france-echecs.com/diagramme/imgboard.php?fen=[/img [/center
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
kevinludwig
Full Member
***
Offline


I love ChessPublishing.com!

Posts: 233
Location: Los Angeles
Joined: 06/13/04
Grunfeld Rb1 question for Cox
04/12/07 at 08:15:28
Post Tools
A question about a side line mentioned in "Starting out: 1 d4!":

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Rb1 0-0 9. Be2 cxd4 10. cxd4 Qa5+ 11. Bd2 Qxa2 12. 0-0 Bg4.

Here John Cox said that the following line has been revived: 13. Rxb7 Bxf3 14. Bxf3 Bxd4 15. Bb4, because the established recipe Rd8 16. Qc1 e5 loses outright to 17. Be7 Re8 18. Qh6. Then John gives the sample line 18. ...Qe6 19. Bg4 Qc6 20. Rc7 Qb6 21. Bg5 Rf8 22. Rfc1 Bxf2+ 23. Kh1.

Unfortunately, Fritz thinks that 18. ...Rxe7 19. Rxe7 Nc6 20. Rc7 is near equal. Which I wonder about, because after all, black has a bishop cemented onto d4, and an a-pawn for the exchange. And, that d4 bishop is really quite nice: It's covering the queening square for the a-pawn, and eyes f2. Together with the queen on a2, the rook is stuck defending the f2 pawn for the foreseeable future. Even if white manages to win the a-pawn outright, that still leaves a position where each side has pawns only on one side of the board, which might be very drawable, even being an exchange down.

Even worse, winning the a-pawn is still a long way off. For example 20. Rc7 Nb4 21. Bd1 Nd3 22. Rc2 Qb1 23. Qh4 a5, and I wonder if black might even have an advantage. With white tied up and defending, how does he deal with that a-pawn--in a few moves it's going to be an absolute monster.

So this is all quite disappointing for me, because I kind of like the idea of playing 13. Rxb7. So is there some way to make this work for white, or is 13. Rxb7 bad after all?

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bookmarks: del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Google+ Linked in reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Yahoo