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Normal Topic Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined (Read 4390 times)
lnn2
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Re: Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
Reply #8 - 11/11/07 at 13:20:11
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I just received Rizzitano's Chess Explained: QGD.

My first impressions are on the positive side. But coverage is obviously not 100% comprehensive, which is usual for the Chess Explained series anyway, though this is definitely more complete than the other recent CE offering: Zenon Franco's Modern Benoni.

Some gaps in the book:
5. Bf4 0-0 6. e3 c5/10. Nd2 (only a few lines given and not the most important ones at that!),
Vienna: 7. e5 not covered (only 7. Bxc4 is given a game)
Ragozin: critical 7. Rc1 missing.
Tarrasch: only 12. Rc1 given, no 12. Qa4 12. Qb3 etc.
Cambridge Springs: strangely 7. cxd5! is mentioned barely in a small paragraph while the theoretically weaker 7. Nd2 is given one full game.

I could go on and on. But I don't think complete coverage is the whole point of this series, since the back cover blurb does say "Chess Explained books are not theoretical works in the traditional sense, but more a series of lessons". I do think this book largely fulfils its aims in the main QGD variations.

Generally this book is strong in the classical lines like Orthodox/Lasker/Tartakower, where Rizzitano is more thorough. But this book is weak in the modern lines like Vienna/Ragozin/Cambridge Springs: in these chapters the missing parts are too significant, no Black player can form any possible repertoire or even obtain a rough idea of the general theory in these lines from this book.

For me the highlights so far are his interesting comments on 9. dxc5 Tarrasch, and the good overview of 5. Bf4 /10. 0-0-0.
  
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Re: Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
Reply #7 - 09/18/07 at 17:27:54
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@bulgroz - I think the Manhattan variation is 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Nbd7 5.e3 Bb4.
  
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bulgroz
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Re: Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
Reply #6 - 09/18/07 at 15:48:15
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@Slates: I have looked at the book of Lalic on Amazon and it deals with Ragozin and Vienna. You were right, but I will wait for this one because I expect it to be up to date (Lalic's book has been published since 2000)...

I also saw a variation named Manhattan ? Which one is it ? What are the moves ?
  
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Re: Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
Reply #5 - 09/18/07 at 14:52:36
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@bulgroz - The book I mentioned by Bogdan Lalic has a lot of coverage of the Ragozin and Vienna lines.  The book by Rizzitano looks like it has about 15 pages on these systems, but until someone actually gets their hands on a copy we won't know anyone's opinion on this more recent coverage.

@Inn2 - thanks for your opinions. When I played the QGD I very rarely met the Catalan - it seems to be unusual at sub-1800 level, where I most definitely lurk. I was always quite glad about this, as I fared badly against it when I did have to play it, but I was seeing more and more 5.Bf4 games the longer I played the QGD, and as I was after a Tartakower whenever possible this wasn't what I wanted....
Incidentally, I played 6...Nbd7 in the 5.Bf4 line but never with much conviction! I guess the Alatortsev appealed to me as a way of avoiding the Exchange, with the reasoning being that again at my level I was unlikely to be 'found out' by White players capable of playing the best book moves in the Alatortsev lines, and mostly the game would transpose and often end up in a Tartakower.
  
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lnn2
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Re: Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
Reply #4 - 09/18/07 at 13:51:18
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I think i will also get this book to get some ideas on how to play the White side of these lines.

@slates: Re statistics on 5. Bf4, the statistics are good for White because White can never lose and grind away risk- free if he chooses the right variations (e.g. 6... c5 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. cxd5, 6... Nbd7 7. a3 c5 8. dxc5 Nxc5 9. cxd5 etc), the situation is therefore similar to the 4. g3 Bb7 Queen's Indian, the only drawback from the White point of view is that the draw percentage is also high.
So in open tournaments where you need to win every game, the Catalan or Exchange QG is probably a better choice against an equally-rated opponent who has been defending the Black side of the QGD for years. Indeed on Shirov's Nimzo DVD, Shirov opined that the Catalan was the best choice against Vaganian for their recent Bundesliga game, as he wanted to avoid Vaganian's French and QGD!
  
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bulgroz
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Re: Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
Reply #3 - 09/18/07 at 13:43:02
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Thanks for your anwers, but you speak about every line in this book except those I talked about in my post  Grin

Nothing to say about Ragozin and Vienna Lines ?
  
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Re: Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
Reply #2 - 09/18/07 at 13:02:36
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I think I may buy this as it looks (from the sample on the publisher's website) as though there is a fair amount of space dedicated to the Alatortsev variation (1d4 d5 2c4 e6 3Nc3 Be7) which I used when playing the QGD but which wasn't always covered so well in the other QGD references I have (Sadler, Kasp DVD, McDonald Starting Out. Bogdan Lalic, though, had a good chapter on it in his QGD Bg5 Systems book).
The line I least wanted to face from the Black side of the QGD was 5.Bf4, and it would seem as though Rizzitano only has two games covering that variation - isn't this line still performing extremely well for White?  Two games seems a little sparse unless Black has solved some of his problems there.

I like Rizzitano's previous books, and this series in general, so hope it will be worthwhile.  I think the Chess Explained series is more consistent than the Starting Out series, generally - some of the SO titles are radically different in terms of quality and apparently target audience, and I don't know that the reason for that is opening-specific. 
  
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TimS
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Re: Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
Reply #1 - 09/18/07 at 09:50:32
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I had a glance at it in a shop on Saturday to see what its coverage was like on a line that particularly interests me: 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Bg5 c5. 4...c5 is called dubious and covered in a single footnote, so no good to me.
Can't say about the lines that interest you but in general I would say the Chess Explained series tends to have reasonably detailed coverage of main lines while scantily covering or missing out altogether lesser but still important lines. In my view the Starting Out series is far superior as an introduction to an opening as it is more comprehensive, but then arguably the two series have different aims
  
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bulgroz
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Chess Explained : The Queen's Gambit Declined
09/17/07 at 16:13:16
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By Rizzitano

What do you think of this book ?
Does it deal adequately with Ragozin and Vienna variation ?
Would you recommend it on these lines ?
  
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