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Normal Topic 10. a5 in the Archangelsk (Read 5164 times)
HgMan
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Re: 10. a5 in the Archangelsk
Reply #6 - 10/06/07 at 00:50:51
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A quick look at many lines after 10...Nxa5 left me wishing that my bishop was on the a7-g1 diagonal, rather than the a5-e1.  From a7, the bishop applies some nice latent pressure across White's position.

Nevertheless, 7.a4 seems to be the real test of the New Archangelsk, and 10.a5 looks interesting.  It looks all wrong, but in practice it's certainly suggested Black should give this some careful thought...
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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GMTonyKosten
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Re: 10. a5 in the Archangelsk
Reply #5 - 10/05/07 at 19:56:18
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luskifuski wrote on 10/05/07 at 11:28:48:
White's strategy shouldn't be underestimated. The profound positional reasoning of white's play is the sorry-looking bishop on a7. If black plays a normal move like Ra8, then white will bolster the d4-pawn and black's bishop will probably never see daylight again.


The problem is that White is unlikely to keep his d-pawn on d4 for the rest of the game, he will want to exchange on e5 or play d5 at some point. The exact same applies when the bishop is on b6, Black is simply putting pressure on d4, which needs to be defended with a piece, and waits for White to move it. I play a lot of such positions with my bishop on a7 or b6 and it has never been 'buried' for long! Smiley
  
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luskifuski
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Re: 10. a5 in the Archangelsk
Reply #4 - 10/05/07 at 11:28:48
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GMTonyKosten wrote on 10/03/07 at 22:11:43:
Both 12...Qe7 and 12...Ra8 should be OK for Black - he is a little worse as White has the centre, but nothing out-of-the-ordinary.

Still, you're right, Timofeev-Halkias is a nice crush, and I should definitely look at this line in more depth some time, maybe next update. Wink


White's strategy shouldn't be underestimated. The profound positional reasoning of white's play is the sorry-looking bishop on a7. If black plays a normal move like Ra8, then white will bolster the d4-pawn and black's bishop will probably never see daylight again. In addition, if black ever play exd4, the c-file will cause him many sorrows
  
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HgMan
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Re: 10. a5 in the Archangelsk
Reply #3 - 10/04/07 at 01:52:17
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I'd be very interested to see this covered in an update (both 10...Ba7 & 10...Nxa5).  My first instinct is the same as Tony's; frequently Black is forced to sacrifice the b-pawn to relieve some of this queenside pressure in order to find counterplay.

Re. 10...Nxa5, I see only one game in this line, the original game with 10.a5:

[Event "Chigorin mem op"]
[Date "2000.10.31"]
[White "Dolmatov,Sergey"]
[Black "Sivokho,Sergey"]
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.a4 Rb8 8.c3 d6 9.d4 Bb6 10.a5 Nxa5 11.Rxa5 Bxa5 12.dxe5 Ng4 13.Bg5 f6 14.exf6 gxf6 15.Bh4 c5 16.h3 h5 17.Nbd2 Rb7 18.Bd5 Rg7 19.e5 Nxe5 20.Nxe5 dxe5 21.Ne4 Rh6 22.Qf3 Rgg6 23.Rd1 Kf8 24.Be6 Qe8 25.Bxc8 Qxc8 26.Bxf6 Kg8 27.Bg5 Qf8 28.Qxf8+ Kxf8 29.Bxh6+ Rxh6 30.Nxc5 Bb6 31.Nd7+ Ke7 32.Nxe5 Re6 33.Nd3 Rd6 34.h4 Kf6 35.Kf1 Kf5 36.g3 a5 37.Ke2 Re6+ 38.Kd2 Rd6 39.Re1 Kg4 40.Re4+ Kf3 41.Rf4+ Kg2 42.Rf5 b4 43.c4 Bd4 44.Rxa5 Bxb2 45.Rxh5 Bc3+ 46.Kc2 Kf3 47.Rb5 Rd4 48.Nxb4 Rxc4 49.Kd3 Rc8 50.Rf5+ Kg2 51.Nc2 Kh3 52.Ne3 Bb4 53.h5 Rc6 54.Rb5 Bc5 55.h6 Bxe3 56.Rh5+ Kg4 57.Rh4+ Kf3 58.fxe3 Rd6+ 59.Kc4 Rd8 60.h7 Rh8 1-0

Sivokho seems to play very sensibly, but the position looks pretty chaotic: Black's king is stuck in the center, d5 looks weak (the whole d-file, for that matter), White has more space, and while the position would seem to favor Black's bishop pair, I just don't see it, especially since Black will have to expend a few tempi to actually put the bishops on worthwhile squares.  More to the point, I don't really see much way to improve on Sivokho's play.  Maybe 16...c4 17.hxg4 cxb3, but then 18.Nd4 makes for a really nicely placed knight.  For all intents and purposes, White has a pawn for the exchange and the initiative.

All in all, I can see why Black tends toward 10...Ba7.  I'll have to look at this more carefully...
  

"Luck favours the prepared mind."  --Louis Pasteur
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GMTonyKosten
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Re: 10. a5 in the Archangelsk
Reply #2 - 10/03/07 at 22:11:43
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It seems odd that White plays a4 to open the a-file and put pressure on the b5-pawn if he then follows-up with a5. It looks like this just makes things easier for Black after 10...Ba7. Then the line 11 h3 0-0 12 Be3 cxd4 13 cxd4 Nxe4 might be playable for Black, but looks more than a little risky, so why not simply defend the e5-pawn? Both 12...Qe7 and 12...Ra8 should be OK for Black - he is a little worse as White has the centre, but nothing out-of-the-ordinary.
Still, you're right, Timofeev-Halkias is a nice crush, and I should definitely look at this line in more depth some time, maybe next update. Wink
  
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luskifuski
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10. a5 in the Archangelsk
Reply #1 - 10/03/07 at 20:04:06
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Here I thought I made the best ever presentation of a variation, but yet I get no response Sad I guess I'll have to boost the analyses myself.

After 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.a4 Rb8 8.c3 d6 9.d4 Bb6 10.a5 Nxa5 11.Rxa5 Bxa5 12.dxe5 Ng4 13.Bg5 Qd7, white has the blow 14.e6! winning a queen

  
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luskifuski
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10. a5 in the Archangelsk
09/30/07 at 08:32:00
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A variation worthy of attention is the fashionable 10. a5 (after 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 b5 6.Bb3 Bc5 7.a4 Rb8 8.c3 d6 9.d4 Bb6 10.a5!?). The variation has gotten much recent attention, and is the favorite antidote of strong Israeli GM Ilya Smirin, GM Nijboer and G. Rohit, whom recently recived his IM title. Timofeev had a brilliant game with it in Dresden Eurochamps 07, which I highly recommend a closer look.

The main line goes 10...Ba7, although Nxa5 might have been neglected and could serve as a nice surprise weapon. White's point after Nxa5 is that 11.Rxa5! is a strong exchange sacrifice, and no black players have dared trying it out lately. It might be worth a closer look.

After 10... Ba7, white plays 11.h3 to prevent Bg4. This represents one of the main white plans: blocking the a7-bishop out of play. Black plays 0-0 after which 12.Be3 is the main line. Black is forced to take action in the center. After exd4 13.cxd4 Nxe4! (my exclam, with the reasoning that "the only way to refute a gambit is to accept it"), white cannot win a piece with 14.Qc2 Qe8 15.Bd5? because of Nb4! 16. Qxe4 Qxe4 17.Bxe4 f5! regaining the piece with an advantege. So instead, white plays 15.Nc3 and black must make a decision.

I hope Tony (and everyone else on the forum) could make some time to look at this line. Especially, as I mentioned, Timofeev-Halkias is worth a look!

  
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