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Normal Topic Play 1.e4 e5 by Davies (Read 2166 times)
rossia
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Re: Play 1.e4 e5 by Davies
Reply #4 - 11/05/07 at 07:46:57
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Now when we have resolved copyright issues  Cool we can move on. So Mr. Kosten what do you think about Davies' repertoire in Two Knights?  Cheesy
  
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GMTonyKosten
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Re: Play 1.e4 e5 by Davies
Reply #3 - 11/04/07 at 21:31:29
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Yes, I don't want to be sued, rossia can you trim those last few emails a bit? Thanks
  
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Re: Play 1.e4 e5 by Davies
Reply #2 - 11/04/07 at 21:16:55
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Hmm ... all very good - but I suspect you are sailing dangerously close to the boundaries of intellectual property law by reproducing all that analysis.

I would just add that in the 'main line' of the Two Knights, after 4.Ng5 d5 5.exd5 Na5 6.Bb5+, 6...Bd7!? is currently looking like a very good alternative to the traditional 6...c6, as recommended by Davies.

The 3...Bc5 repertoire given by Kaufman in The Chess Advantage in Black and White is also excellent, although somewhat less ambitious.
  

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rossia
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Re: Play 1.e4 e5 by Davies
Reply #1 - 11/04/07 at 20:23:12
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Here are the mentioned games:


1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4

[3.d4 exd4 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.e5

(5.0-0 Nxe4 6.Re1 d5 7.Bxd5 Qxd5 8.Nc3 Qh5 9.Nxe4 Be6 10.Bg5 Bd6 11.Bf6 Bxh2+ 12.Nxh2 Qxd1 13.Raxd1 gxf6 14.Nxf6+ Kf8 15.Nf3 Rd8 16.Ng5 Bf5 17.Rd2 Kg7 18.Nge4 h5 19.f3 Rh6 20.g4 hxg4 21.fxg4 Bxe4 22.Nxe4 Ne5 23.Kg2 Rdh8 24.Rxd4 Rh2+ 25.Kg3 R8h3+ 26.Kf4 Nf3 27.Red1 Nxd4 28.Rxd4 Rxc2 29.Rd7 Rxb2 30.Rxc7 Rb4 31.Re7 Ra3 32.Kg5 Ra5+ 33.Kf4 Rxa2 34.Kf3 Ra3+ 0-1 Karaklajic,N-Jovanovic,S/Palic 1996)

5...Ne4 6.Bd5 Nc5 7.Bxc6

(7.0-0 Be7 8.Qe2 0-0 9.Rd1 Qe8 10.Bf4 Ne6 11.Bg3 Kh8 12.Nbd2 f5 13.exf6 Bxf6 14.Re1 Qg6 15.Qc4 Qh5 16.a4 a6 17.a5 Ne7 18.Bxe6 dxe6 19.Qxc7 Nc6 20.Qb6 Qd5 21.Qb3 Bd7 22.Nc4 Rad8 23.Nfd2 Bc8 24.Nb6 Qxb3 25.Nxb3 Nb4 26.Re2 Nd5 27.Nc4 Bd7 28.Nd6 Bc6 29.Nc5 e5 30.Ndxb7 Bxb7 31.Nxb7 Rb8 32.Nc5 Rxb2 33.Nd3 Nc3 34.Rxe5 Bxe5 35.Nxb2 Ne2+ 36.Kh1 Nxg3+ 37.hxg3 d3 0-1 Gurevich,V-Romanishin,O/Herson 1989)

7...dxc6 8.Qxd4 Bf5 9.Qc3 Ne6 10.Be3 Qd5 11.Nbd2 Be7 12.a3 0-0 13.0-0-0 c5 14.Nb3 Qc6 15.Rd2 Rfd8 16.Rhd1 Rxd2 17.Rxd2 a5 18.Nxa5 Qa6 19.Nb3 Qf1+ 20.Rd1 Qxg2 21.Ne1 Qc6 22.Nd2 Rd8 23.Nf1 Rxd1+ 24.Kxd1 Bg4+ 25.Kc1 Qd5 26.b3 Nd4 27.Bxd4 cxd4 28.Qxc7 Bxa3+ 29.Kb1 Qh1 30.Qc4 Bh3 31.e6 fxe6 32.b4 Qxf1 33.Qc8+ Kf7 34.Qd7+ Kg6 0-1 Kozakov,M-Jonkman,H/Lvov 2001]

3...Nf6 4.Ng5

[4.d3 Be7 5.Bb3 0-0 6.0-0 d6 7.c3 Na5 8.Bc2 c5 9.Nbd2 Qc7 10.Re1 Be6 11.Nf1 Rad8 12.Ng3 Nc6 13.Qe2 Rfe8 14.Ng5 Bg4 15.f3 Bc8 16.Bb3 Rf8 17.f4 Bg4 18.Nf3 exf4 19.Bxf4 Ne5 20.d4 Ng6 21.Bd2 cxd4 22.cxd4 Qb6 23.Qf2 Be6 24.d5 Qxf2+ 25.Kxf2 Ng4+ 26.Kg1 Bc8 27.Bc3 N4e5 28.Bd4 b6 29.a4 Bf6 30.Nxe5 Bxe5 31.Bxe5 Nxe5 32.a5 g6 33.axb6 axb6 34.Rec1 Bd7 35.Ra6 Rb8 36.Ba4 Rfc8 37.Rc3 b5 38.Bd1 b4 39.Rxc8+ Rxc8 40.Ne2 Rc4 41.Rxd6 Rxe4 42.h3 Bb5 43.Rd8+ Kg7 44.Kf2 f5 45.b3 Nd3+ 46.Kf3 Ne5+ 47.Kf2 Nd3+ 48.Kf3 Ne1+ 49.Kf2 Nxg2 50.Ng3 Rd4 51.Bf3 Rd2+ 52.Kg1 Nf4 53.Rb8 Nxh3+ 54.Kh1 Nf2+ 55.Kg1 Nh3+ 56.Kh1 Ng5 0-1 Dolmatov,S-Romanishin,O/USSR Championship, Minsk 1979]

4...d5 5.exd5 Na5 6.Bb5+

[6.d3 h6 7.Nf3 e4 8.Qe2 Nxc4 9.dxc4 Bc5 10.c3 b5 11.cxb5 0-0 12.Nd4 Qxd5 13.Be3 Bg4 14.Qd2 a6 15.bxa6 Bd6 16.h3 Bc8 17.a7 Ba6 18.a4 Bd3 19.Na3 Rxa7 20.Nab5 Ra6 21.Nxd6 Qxd6 22.Ne2 Rfa8 23.0-0 Rxa4 24.Rxa4 Rxa4 25.Re1 Nd5 26.Nc1 Ra8 27.b4 Nxe3 28.Qxe3 Qd5 29.Qf4 c6 30.Nxd3 exd3 31.c4 Qd7 32.Rd1 Rd8 33.Qe5 Qd4 34.Qxd4 Rxd4 35.b5 Rxc4 1/2-1/2 Spitz,P-Piccardo,V/Correspondence 2004]

6...c6 7.dxc6 bxc6 8.Be2

[8.Qf3 h6 9.Ne4 Nd5 10.Nbc3 cxb5 11.Nxd5 Be6 12.Ne3 Rc8 13.0-0 Nc6 14.d3 Qd7 15.Ng3 h5 16.c3 h4 17.Ngf5 h3 18.g3 Ne7 19.g4 g6 20.Nxe7 Bxe7 21.Qe4 0-0 22.Qxe5 Qxd3 23.Nf5 Bxf5 24.Bh6 f6 25.Qxe7 Rf7 26.Qe3 Qxe3 27.Bxe3 Bxg4 28.f3 Bf5 1/2-1/2 Azevedo Pessoa,F-Davies,N/Correspondence 2004]

8...h6 9.Nf3

[9.Nh3 g5 10.d3 Bg7 11.Nc3 0-0 12.Ng1 Nb7 13.Nf3 Nd5 14.0-0 Nd6 15.Ne4 f5 16.Nxd6 Qxd6 17.Nd2 g4 18.Re1 Ba6 19.Bf1 Qg6 20.g3 Rad8 21.c4 Nb4 22.d4 Rxd4 23.Qa4 c5 24.Nb3 Nc2 25.Nxd4 Nxd4 26.Bg2 f4 27.Bd5+ Kh8 28.Be4 Nf3+ 29.Bxf3 gxf3 30.Bd2 Qg4 31.Kh1 fxg3 32.Qxa6 Qh3 0-1 Grischuk,A-Malaniuk,V/Russian Team Championship 2001]

9...e4 10.Ne5 Bc5 11.c3 Qc7 12.f4 Nb7 13.b4 Bd6 14.Na3 Nd5 15.0-0 Nxf4 16.Rxf4 Bxe5 17.Rxe4 0-0 18.Nc4 Bxh2+ 19.Kh1 Nd6 20.Nxd6 Bxd6 21.d4 Bf5 22.Re3 Rae8 23.Bf3 Bg3 24.Bg4 Be4 25.Bd2 f5 26.Bh5 Qf4 27.Rxg3 Qxg3 28.Qg1 g6 29.Bd1 Qh3+ 30.Qh2 Bxg2+ 31.Kg1 Qxh2+ 32.Kxh2 Be4 33.Bxh6 Rf7 34.Bd2 Rh7+ 35.Kg3 Rh1 36.Rc1 Rg1+ 37.Kf2 Rg2+ 38.Kf1 Rxd2 39.c4 Bg2+ 40.Kg1 Re1+ 0-1

« Last Edit: 11/05/07 at 06:55:20 by rossia »  
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rossia
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Play 1.e4 e5 by Davies
11/04/07 at 20:21:16
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Hi to everyone!

What do you think about following repertoire for Black against 1.e4 e4 2. Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4:

Extract from book: CHAPTER 6: TWO KNIGHTS DEFENCE

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Nf6

If White plays 1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4, both 3...Nf6 4 Ng5 and 3...Bc5 4 b4!? - or
4 c3 Nf6 5 d4 - allow White to sharpen the struggle and involve his opponent in
having to know some theory. My choice of 3...Nf6, the Two Knights Defence, was
made because of its relative pugnacity. White cannot easily create an equal
position in which it is difficult for Black to play for a win.

After 3...Nf6 White's 4 Ng5 effectively wins a pawn, but the lost time gives Black
good compensation after 4...d5 5 exd5 Na5.

In Alekseev-Yemelin we see what is essentially the main line (9 Nf3), but with my
recommendation being the slightly unusual 10...Bc5 rather than 10...Bd6, and
then Yemelin's 12...Nb7!?. Black seems to be doing quite well here, and the fact
that this line is quite unusual should mean that many exponents of White's side
will be caught unawares.

Instead of 9 Nf3 White can also try Steinitz's 9 Nh3, which is another move that
Bobby Fischer rehabilitated. But against this I think that Malaniuk's 9...g5
followed by 10...Bg7 (Grischuk-Malaniuk) is a strong plan, shutting the knight out
of the game and setting about advancing the kingside pawns.

In my correspondence game with Azevedo Pessoa (Azevedo Pessoa-Davies) my
opponent tried another unusual move that the Dutch GM John Van der Wiel has
played in several games, namely 8 Qf3. I felt that Black had some initiative but
White finally managed to force a draw by perpetual check. If Black wants more he
could examine 11...Bb7!? instead of 11...Be6.

Finally there is 6 d3, which was recently given a run out in the correspondence
game Spitz-Piccardo. Black obtained good counterplay, although there may be
more to be said in this complex line.

Rather than force Black to play a promising gambit, White can try to seize the
initiative with 4 d4. After 4...exd4 5 e5 I like the unusual but sound 5...Ne4!?,
which has also been the choice of strong grandmasters such as Romanishin.

In Kozakov-Jonkman White recovers the pawn with 6 Bd5 Nc5 7 Bxc6 but gives
Black excellent light square play. V.Gurevich-Romanishin features the more
testing 7 0-0, but even so Black gets counterplay with the clever 7...Be7 8 Qe2 0-
0 9 Rd1 Qe8!. White can also try 5 0-0 instead of 5 e5, but this was essentially
put out of commission in Karaklajic-Jovanovic with 11...Bxh2+.

Finally we come to 4 d3, which often leads to similar positions to the Closed
Variation of the Ruy Lopez. Dolmatov-Romanishin features a good way to treat
this line for Black, playing ...Rad8 before retreating the knight to c6 and just letting White capture on e6 if that's what
he wants to do.

Summary

4 Ng5 leads to very complex positions in which Black gets ongoing compensation
for the sacrificed pawn. 4 d4 doesn't cause Black much trouble after either
4...exd4 5 e5 or 5 0-0 Nxe4, while 4 d3 is similar to a Closed Spanish.

Index

1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Nf6 4 Ng5
4 d3 - Dolmatov-Romanishin
4 d4 exd4
5 0-0 - Karaklajic-Jovanovic
5 e5 Ne4 6 Bd5 Nc5
7 Bxc6 - Kozakov-Jonkman
7 0-0 - V.Gurevich-Romanishin
4...d5 5 exd5 Na5 6 Bb5+
6 d3 - Spitz-Piccardo
6...c6 7 dxc6 bxc6 8 Be2
8 Qf3 - Azevedo Pessoa-Davies
8...h6 9 Nf3 - Alekseev-Yemelin
9 Nh3 - Grischuk-Malaniuk
  
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