Latest Updates:
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 [2] 
Topic Tools
Hot Topic (More than 10 Replies) Moskalenko Budapest book - views? (Read 21370 times)
kylemeister
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 4655
Location: USA
Joined: 10/24/05
Re: Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
Reply #8 - 01/19/08 at 20:28:12
Post Tools
I've always thought that 3...Bc5 is the standard move.  NCO gives that as leading to equality, while ECO gives it as leading to a slight advantage for Black.

  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
dsanchez
Full Member
***
Offline


24.Nh1!?N

Posts: 182
Joined: 01/24/06
Re: Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
Reply #7 - 01/19/08 at 20:19:42
Post Tools
kylemeister wrote on 01/19/08 at 19:54:40:
I've long had the impression that 3. d5 is common below some rating level, but it always appeared to me that the theoretical issue is whether White can equalize.


If there were some qualification for having an opinion, I wouldn't be allowed to have one.  But since there isn't  Wink, I kind of feel like 3.d5 is not the most testing move, and it probably gives up any advantage White might have out of this opening, but is it possible that he is now fighting for equality?  If Black plays normal moves, it looks like we could end up in a normal-looking KID or Benoni type of position.  I've been toying with the idea of 3...c6 to mix things up a bit.  Moskalenko recommends the Benko-ish 3...b5.


  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
dsanchez
Full Member
***
Offline


24.Nh1!?N

Posts: 182
Joined: 01/24/06
Re: Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
Reply #6 - 01/19/08 at 19:59:51
Post Tools
It is not a repertoire book.  Just the Big 3 main line variations (4.Bf4, 4.e4, 4.Nf3), a few of the less common tries (4.f4, 4.Qd4/5), and a bit on the declined stuff.

I think there have been some threads on this site about repertoires that include the Budapest -- not positive about that though.

4.e3 Ngxe5 5.Nh3 receives very little coverage -- only one game that I can tell.  Mosk annotates the game Gurevich - Tisdall, 1988, where Black played 5...g6.  He also comments that 5...Bc5, 5...d6, and 5...Ng6 are also playable, but he doesn't offer a whole lot in the way of thematic ideas. 

If you're thinking about investing in this book, do so for the coverage of the main lines, which is pretty good.  The sidelines are mentioned for the sake of thoroughness, but that's about it.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
kylemeister
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 4655
Location: USA
Joined: 10/24/05
Re: Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
Reply #5 - 01/19/08 at 19:54:40
Post Tools
I've long had the impression that 3. d5 is common below some rating level, but it always appeared to me that the theoretical issue is whether White can equalize.  

I also have the impression that John Donaldson's reviews are shadows of their former selves ...
http://www.jeremysilman.com/book_reviews_jd/Fabulous_Budapest_Gambit.html
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Matemax
God Member
*****
Offline


Chesspub gives you strength!

Posts: 1302
Joined: 11/04/07
Re: Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
Reply #4 - 01/19/08 at 19:14:58
Post Tools
Thx  Smiley
2 more questions:
Is it a repertoire book?
Does he also cover the system with Nh3 and e3?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
dsanchez
Full Member
***
Offline


24.Nh1!?N

Posts: 182
Joined: 01/24/06
Re: Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
Reply #3 - 01/19/08 at 17:27:29
Post Tools
I have this book.  Haven't had a chance to dig in too deeply yet, but so far I like it and would recommend it above either Tseitlin's book or Borik's old book.

It has a nice mix of strategic discussion and theoretical analisys.  I'd say it's a good start for someone just starting out with the BG, or someone who wants an annotated collection of quality BG games.  It's a bit inconsistent at times.  Sometimes Moskalenko will look at alternative variations in some detail; other times he will simply say something like: "7...Bg4 is also okay."

Speaking of "Starting Out," I'd say this book falls somewhere between the first Starting Out books published 5 or 6 years ago, which covered basic ideas, plans, and piece placements, and the Starting Out books today with their ridiculous morass of variations. 

Moskalenko uses a lot of space covering Rubinstein's 4.Bf4.  In fact, the first 100 or so pages are dedicated to this variation.  He discusses the merits and drawbacks of 5.Nc3 and 5.Nd2 using both classic and modern games to illustrate the evolution of the opening.  He also discusses White's 11.e3 vs 11.g3 in the main lines, recommending 11.g3 as stronger.  He gives some analysis to the ubiquitous 4...g5, which seems to bet the prescription against almost any opening these days.

The second part of the book is devoted to Alekhine's 4.e4.  Moskalenko recommends either the immediate 4...Nxe5 or 4...h4!?. After 4...Nxe5 he spends some time on 5.f4.

The third part covers the classical 4.Nf3, which at amateur levels is far and away the most popular move.

The final part of the book is dedicated to the Gambit declined and the Fajarowicz.  Coverage of the declined gambit is relatively scant, Moskalenko dismissing the lines as "not posing Black great difficulties."  In my opinion, this dismissive view is a serious deficiency.  At amateur level, 3.d5 is almost as popular as accepting the gambit, and while it may not cause Black great difficulties, I think one would still have to say White has a slight edge, and the flavor of the game is changed considerably.  If you are going to write a book aimed toward amateurs about a gambit system, whether it's the Budapest, the Smith-Morra, the Goring, or whatever, you simply have to put some effort into the declined variations.

Moskalenko's style is a bit desultory, and sometimes it's a bit difficult to follow his train of thought.  He'll make a few introductory remarks about a system, then go off on a bit of a tangent, and then come back to it later.  But the overall organization of the book is coherent enough.

In summary:  I think it's a good book, and probably essential for anyone who plays the BG or who wants to learn the BG.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bibs
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 2174
Joined: 10/24/06
Re: Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
Reply #2 - 01/19/08 at 16:52:34
Post Tools
Hmm. Somewhere on the hfile.

Osaka, Japan.
Maybe somewhere in China nearest - Shanghai a possibility.  Maybe Hong Kong - but not much chess there. Nothing in Koreas.
South a bit to Australia the safest bet I imagine. Are they sufficiently literate down there to justify the existence of book shops? Will look alphabetically between beer and cricket and hope. Next to biogs of the Chappell brothers no doubt.

Anyhow, enough of this drivel - views anyone?
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Matemax
God Member
*****
Offline


Chesspub gives you strength!

Posts: 1302
Joined: 11/04/07
Re: Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
Reply #1 - 01/19/08 at 15:42:50
Post Tools
Quote:
Distance to nearest shop stocking chess books in the thousands of miles for me

I dont have the book but would appreciate comments on it. What I even more curios about is your position on this globe - lets say Paris=e4 where are you living?  Huh
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bibs
God Member
*****
Offline



Posts: 2174
Joined: 10/24/06
Moskalenko Budapest book - views?
01/19/08 at 09:25:05
Post Tools
Just wondering - has anyone got a copy yet or had a proper look?

(No comments from anyone about 'avoid with Nf3',' is it sound?' or similar dirge thank you m'dears.)

Views?

Yeah, okay for club, but so is anything. Genuinely worthy material inside?

Any comments much appreciated. Distance to nearest shop stocking chess books in the thousands of miles for me, so have to reply on amazon and you folks.

Thanks in advance anyone,

Bibs
« Last Edit: 01/19/08 at 15:04:25 by Bibs »  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 [2] 
Topic Tools
Bookmarks: del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Google+ Linked in reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Yahoo