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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Beating Radjabov in the Schliemann with d3? (Read 39361 times)
MNb
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Re: Beating Radjabov in the Schliemann with d3?
Reply #1 - 04/19/08 at 20:26:27
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In line a) 21...Kb8 looks more stubborn, but White may try 21.Rb5 eg Qf5 22.h3 Qf2+ 23.Kh2 Qxe3 24.Rf1! 1-0.

17.b4 looks nasty to me. It seems that I have to change my opinion that 4.Nc3 is superior to 4.d3 - after both White might prove an advantage! The line I recommended before - 4.d3 Nf6 5.0-0 fxe4 6.dxe4 - only transposes.
  

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Matemax
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Beating Radjabov in the Schliemann with d3?
04/19/08 at 15:44:51
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Hi my dear chessfriends!

I hope you dont mind that I try to give the 4.d3-Schliemann/Jaenisch another go. GM Tony Kosten discussed Carlsen-Radjabov in the April 2008 update on chesspublishing.com - the core variation (at the moment) for the 4.d3 line:

After the moves:
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 4.d3 fxe4 5.dxe4 Nf6 6.O-O Bc5 7.Qd3 d6 8.Qc4 Qe7 9.Nc3 Bd7 10.Nd5 Nxd5 11.exd5 Nd4 12.Nxd4 Bxd4 13.Bxd7+ Qxd7 14.a4 a6 15.Be3 Bxe3 16.fxe3 O-O-O

we reach an important position:

* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
* * * * * * * *
*

In this position Carlsen and before him Topalov played 17.Rf2 against Radjabov.

Having a look at Yearbook 73 I read on page 95 a suggestion from John Shaw: 17.b4

I could not find any games with 17.b4 (chesslive.de) - but I think it is a serious winning try - I put together some sample variations:

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 f5 4.d3 fxe4 5.dxe4 Nf6 6.O-O Bc5 7.Qd3 d6 8.Qc4 Qe7 9.Nc3 Bd7 10.Nd5 Nxd5 11.exd5 Nd4 12.Nxd4 Bxd4 13.Bxd7+ Qxd7 14.a4 a6 15.Be3 Bxe3 16.fxe3 O-O-O 17.b4

17...Rdf8 (following Radjabov) I would now suggest 18.Rfb1!?.

This move may look strange at first thougth - why give up the open file? The idea is to avoid further exchanges of pieces and to keep attacking material.

Now what may happen if Black just takes the f-file:
18...Rf7 19.b5 a5 (only move) 20.b6

Lets have a look at two possible continuations:

a) 20...Rhf8 21.Ra3 Qf5 ( 21...h5 22.Rc3 Kb8 23.bxc7+ Qxc7 24.Qd3 Qe7 25.Rcb3±) 22.h3 g5 23.Rc3 g4 24.Qxg4 Qxg4 25.hxg4 Kb8 26.Kh2 Rg8 27.bxc7+ Rxc7 28.Rxc7 Kxc7 29.Kh3+̳

b) 20...Qf5? 21.Rf1 Qd7 22.Rxf7 Qxf7 23.Rf1 Qd7 24.Qc3±

What are your thoughts? Where to improve for Black?
« Last Edit: 04/19/08 at 19:01:00 by Matemax »  
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