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Normal Topic English / Grand Prix hybrid (Read 2946 times)
MNb
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Re: English / Grand Prix hybrid
Reply #5 - 09/07/08 at 21:01:04
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On this site

http://hem.passagen.se/tjmisha/

you might find the comment

Quote:
When I mentioned Brynte's gambit to a danish GM in my club team, Henrik Danielsen, his first reaction was: "Why not play a Fajarowich gambit with an extra tempo?". And indeed, why not? Last time I spoke with him, he said that he'd scored quite well with 4.Ne5 on the ICC... 4.Ne5!? Nf6 5.d3 exd3 (5...Nbd7 6.Qg4?? Nxg4 0-1 rickyII-Lyubimov/localhost 1998 (6)) 6.Bxd3 g6 7.Nxf7 Kxf7 8.Bxg6+ is a trap to remember, in blitz it will surely have a lot of victims.
  

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Re: English / Grand Prix hybrid
Reply #4 - 09/07/08 at 14:38:32
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Of course as Chevalier says, Black should be and actually is at least equal after 1.e4 c5, 2.f4 d5!..

However, as a surprise weapon or as part of a blitz/rapid tournament repertoire, I would draw people's attention on playing 1. e4 c5, 2.f4 d5, 3.Nf3!? dxe4, 4.Ne5!? reaching a Colour Reversed Fajarowicz Gambit (of the Budapest Gambit variety) with f4 played extra - the equivalent f5 when playing it for Black IS a useful move in SOME lines..

  
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Re: English / Grand Prix hybrid
Reply #3 - 05/25/08 at 11:45:34
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Do you mean 1 e4 c5 2 Nc3 Nc6 3 f4 g6 (the main line, but by no means the only good option) 4 Nf3 Bg7 5 Be2?

I was rather more thinking of the sequence

1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 g6 3 e4 d6 ( so far the move order of Gruenfeld avoiders or Botvinnik system fans) and now 4 f4 Bg7 5 Nf3. Here there is a choice - 5 .. 0-0 allowing 6 d4 with a KID four pawn or 5 ..c5 allowing the GPA hybrid after 6 d3.

After I allowed the four pawn transposition, I had a look round the room and noticed Basman playing this English/GPA hybrid with the white pieces.

It's yet another old Nimzowitsch idea - for example N v Alekhine at Dresden in 1926 started 1 e4 Nf6 2 d3 c5 3 c4 Nc6 4 Nc3 e6 5 f4
  
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IMRichardPalliser
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Re: English / Grand Prix hybrid
Reply #2 - 05/25/08 at 10:25:06
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Do you mean 1 e4 c5 2 Nc3 Nc6 3 f4 g6 (the main line, but by no means the only good option) 4 Nf3 Bg7 5 Be2? I seem to recall that Taylor had some coverage, but via a Bird's move order, in his work on that opening. The system is a bit reversed Dutch-like, but a Sicilian player used to meeting the Closed and more usual GP lines should surely be OK here?
  
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Chevalier
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Re: English / Grand Prix hybrid
Reply #1 - 05/24/08 at 22:08:08
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1.e4 c5 2.f4?! d5! and Black is at least equal.

1.c4 c5 2.e4?! Nc6 3.f4 g6 4.Nf3 Bg7 and Black is slightly better in view of his outpost on d4. White does not have such an outpost after ...d6 and ...e6 by Black.

In conclusion: This "English/Grand Prix combination setup looks very dodgy to me, except perhaps against the Hippo Grin.
  

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RdC
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English / Grand Prix hybrid
05/24/08 at 11:13:41
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I've seen a number of games recently in UK events where white has used  a plan (in some order) of e4,f4,d3,c4, Nc3, Nf3 and Be2 against Sicilians and similar. This can be introduced either from 1 e4 or 1 c4 and is a hybrid between the English and the GPA with some references to the Botvinnik lines of the English.

Is it just fashion or has someone written an article or book chapter advocating it?
  
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