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Normal Topic Rauzer 9.f3 (Read 2952 times)
Paddy
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Re: Rauzer 9.f3
Reply #6 - 11/11/08 at 12:15:46
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Paddy wrote on 11/10/08 at 19:10:12:
Paddy wrote on 06/20/08 at 14:47:41:
I notice that the Finnish Rauser expert Yrjola has played the move order 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 a6 8 0-0-0 Be7!?. This enables Black to react differently to the f3 strategy. Of course, Black cannot now play the "Kozul Suicide variation" against White's f4 strategy, but is the Spassky variation 9 f4 Bd7 10 Nf3 b5 so bad?



In the last few months this variation, 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 a6 8 0-0-0 Be7!?, has been used successsfully by Malakhov and even Kotronias, that long-time adherent of the old main line 7 Qd2 Be7 8 0-0-0 0-0, has tried it. The latest convert is Dreev, who used it twice in his recent victory in the tournament in Barcelona.

However, after 9 f4, instead of transposing to the Spassky line (I do not really understand why this is not played more), they have been exchanging on d4 and playing a quick ...b5. Play becomes sharp and somewhat Najdorf-like.


I note that Richard Palliser has recently annotated a 2008 Malakhov game with 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 a6 8 0-0-0 Be7 for Chess Publishing. He indicates that one of the main areas in which there are still problems to be solved (or answers yet to be revealed, e.g. by Dreev and Malakhov) is the ultra-aggressive Kasparov line 9 f4 Nxd4 10 Qxd4 b5 11 Bxf6 gxf6 12 e5, where Black's centre and two bishops may or may not compensate sufficiently for the weak king and White's tremendous piece activity.

Milen Petrov: Yes, if you want to play the "real" Kozul then of course you have to commit the bishop early to d7, which does not seem to be ideal in lines where White chooses the f3 plan.

That is why I became interested in the 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 a6 8 0-0-0 Be7 move order, which I think gives Black better chances against the f3 plan, but is very risky against the f4 plan, UNLESS Black is willing to revert to the Spassky variation 9 f4 Bd7!? when it seems that Black has sufficient counterplay in the line 10 Nf3 b5! 11 e5 b4! but after 11 Bxf6 he must either gambit a pawn for possibly insufficent compensation after Simagin's 11...Bxf6 12 Qxd6 Ra7 or Be7, or accept a Kozul in which he has already committed his extra bishop to e7 (in the Kozul proper the bishop is still on f8, and can sometimes find greater activity on the f8-h6 diagonal). However, as Yrjola argued in his excellent little book on the Classical Sicilian, Black might be OK in this line in any case (at least the Soviets thought so in 1974 when this was one of Spassky's main defences against Fischer!), and in any event Black has a clear plan over the next few moves.
  
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MilenPetrov
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Re: Rauzer 9.f3
Reply #5 - 11/11/08 at 06:46:32
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Paddy, I agree with you.
Recently I was rechecking my Rauzer repertoire for Black. I found some things missing in the CP Rauzer files and ebook and I will make a new post when i finish my work on this (for example Margate variation is not covered fully and also Kotronias's novelty against Topalov from Sigeman tournament, 2007). My problem is that I want to play Kozul's variation. Doing this Black allows this 9.f3 stuff. My recent games showed that Black have hard time first to equalize and then to fight for a win. The good thing is that the resulting positions are unclear and give chances for both sides for mistakes. So better prepared player has a small advantage Wink.
  
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Re: Rauzer 9.f3
Reply #4 - 11/10/08 at 19:10:12
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Paddy wrote on 06/20/08 at 14:47:41:
I notice that the Finnish Rauser expert Yrjola has played the move order 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 a6 8 0-0-0 Be7!?. This enables Black to react differently to the f3 strategy. Of course, Black cannot now play the "Kozul Suicide variation" against White's f4 strategy, but is the Spassky variation 9 f4 Bd7 10 Nf3 b5 so bad?



In the last few months this variation, 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 a6 8 0-0-0 Be7!?, has been used successsfully by Malakhov and even Kotronias, that long-time adherent of the old main line 7 Qd2 Be7 8 0-0-0 0-0, has tried it. The latest convert is Dreev, who used it twice in his recent victory in the tournament in Barcelona.

However, after 9 f4, instead of transposing to the Spassky line (I do not really understand why this is not played more), they have been exchanging on d4 and playing a quick ...b5. Play becomes sharp and somewhat Najdorf-like.
  
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Re: Rauzer 9.f3
Reply #3 - 06/20/08 at 14:47:41
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MilenPetrov wrote on 06/20/08 at 12:20:43:
OK, here are two lines:
12.Nc6 Bc6 (12....bc6 13.Bg5 Qa5+=)
1) 13.Kb1 Qc7 14.Bf4 Rd8 (14...0-0-0 is inferior i think) and now the most challenging plan for White is Rh1-h3-g3 keeping initiative on the kingside.
2) 13.Bf4 d5 (13...e5 14.Bg5) 14.Be5 de4 15.Qf4 (15.Qg5) Qb6 16.Be2 ef3 17.gf3 Rd8 18.Rd8 Bd8 19.Rd1

Both variations arose in my corr. games which are far ahead, but I was not so happy with the opening outcome.
Regards and thanks for sharing your thoughts
Milen Petrov


Well, I guess you already know that life is nearly always more difficult for Black in the Rauser, since White has more space and the safer king. White can make small mistakes and nothing serious happens, but  Black's position is far less "forgiving".

Some specific comments:

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cd4 4.Nd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 Bd7 9.f3 Be7 10.h4 h6 11.Be3 h5 12.Nc6

First, it is not at all clear to me that 12...bxc6 is so bad. The position is very unbalanced and Black has problems about where to put his king, but the huge mass of centre pawns and the half-open b-file probably fulfil Botvinnik's dictum that " a game with counter-chances adequately cancels out the advantage of first move" and it becomes irrelevant whether the position is +=, = or =+. Is there a plan for White?

Second, I am sure that many Najdorf players would be happy to have Black's position after 13.Kb1 Qc7 14.Bf4 0-0-0. What is White's plan? This might be better than 14...Rd8, when it looks dangerous to castle kingside but leaving the king in the centre is not very attractive either.

Third, is the somewhat irrational variation 13.Bf4 d5 14.Be5 de4 15.Qf4 Qb6 16.Be2 ef3 17.gf3 Rd8 18.Rd8 Bd8 19.Rd1 so bad for Black? White has to prove compensation for the pawn and I can see nothing concrete for White after say 19...Be7 or even the computer move 19...Rg8.

But perhaps I am simply not strong enough to understand these positions (2145 FIDE). Undecided

PS Two ideas for Rauser fans that might be worth investigating:

a) I notice that the Finnish Rauser expert Yrjola has played the move order 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 a6 8 0-0-0 Be7!?. This enables Black to react differently to the f3 strategy. Of course, Black cannot now play the "Kozul Suicide variation" against White's f4 strategy, but is the Spassky variation 9 f4 Bd7 10 Nf3 b5 so bad?

b) Timman recently played (with success I should say) the rare line 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 0-0 8 0-0-0 0-0 9 f4 h6 10 Bh4 Bd7 11 Nf3 Qa5 12 Kb1 and now Rfc8, which is not mentioned in Experts vs the Sicilian, where Peter Wells gives only 12...Rfd8..

  
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MilenPetrov
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Re: Rauzer 9.f3
Reply #2 - 06/20/08 at 12:20:43
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OK, here are two lines:
12.Nc6 Bc6 (12....bc6 13.Bg5 Qa5+=)
1) 13.Kb1 Qc7 14.Bf4 Rd8 (14...0-0-0 is inferior i think) and now the most challenging plan for White is Rh1-h3-g3 keeping initiative on the kingside.
2) 13.Bf4 d5 (13...e5 14.Bg5) 14.Be5 de4 15.Qf4 (15.Qg5) Qb6 16.Be2 ef3 17.gf3 Rd8 18.Rd8 Bd8 19.Rd1

Both variations arose in my corr. games which are far ahead, but I was not so happy with the opening outcome.
Regards and thanks for sharing your thoughts
Milen Petrov
  
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Paddy
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Re: Rauzer 9.f3
Reply #1 - 06/20/08 at 11:42:15
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MilenPetrov wrote on 06/19/08 at 13:14:30:
Hello everyone,
after a short pause recently I looked at the following line in Rauzer:
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cd4 4.Nd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 Bd7 9.f3 Be7 10.h4 h6 11.Be3 h5 and now 12.Nc6. I think this move is underestimated and White is slightly better in the resulting positions. I would appreciate to hear your opinion on this line. If Black is not doing well, maybe then he has to switch to 9...Rc8  Undecided

Regards
Milen Petrov


Milen
I can find very few games with 12 Nxc6, which has not previously been regarded as critical. To me Black seems to get acceptable play, in the usual slightly masochistic Rauser style.

Did you have a particular game or line in mind, that we can analyze please?
  
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MilenPetrov
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Rauzer 9.f3
06/19/08 at 13:14:30
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Hello everyone,
after a short pause recently I looked at the following line in Rauzer:
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cd4 4.Nd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 a6 8.0-0-0 Bd7 9.f3 Be7 10.h4 h6 11.Be3 h5 and now 12.Nc6. I think this move is underestimated and White is slightly better in the resulting positions. I would appreciate to hear your opinion on this line. If Black is not doing well, maybe then he has to switch to 9...Rc8  Undecided

Regards
Milen Petrov
  
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