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Normal Topic 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3/Nf3 c6 4.cxd5!? (Read 2163 times)
LeeRoth
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Re: 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3/Nf3 c6 4.cxd5!?
Reply #3 - 11/24/08 at 19:42:52
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After 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.cxd5 exd5 4.Nc3 c6 5.Qc2 Bd6 6.Nf3 Nge7 7.Bg5, is there anything wrong with the straightforward 7..f6!? 8.Bh4 Bf5.  I've always thought this was an easy way for Black to equalize.
  
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Paul Cumbers
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Re: 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3/Nf3 c6 4.cxd5!?
Reply #2 - 11/24/08 at 14:24:41
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MNb wrote on 11/23/08 at 19:58:57:
Van der Werf and Van der Vorm give 5.Qc2 Bd6 ("g6 preparing ...Bf5 is an interesting alternative") 6.Nf3 Ne7 7.Bg5 Bg4 8.e3 Bh5 9.Bd3 Bg6 Bener-Lau, Oostende 1996 as "at least equal".
5.Bf4 Bf5 6.e3 Nf6 7.Bd3 Bxd3 8.Qxd3 Bd6 and 5.Nf3 Bf5 6.Bf4 Nf6 7.e3 Qb6 are equal as well.
These last two lines belong to the QGD Exchange Variation indeed, but are not quite the most promising ones for White.

Thanks MNb for those lines (I'm guessing it should be 8...Bh5 in the first one). I was surprised that Glenn Flear's "starting out: slav and semi-slav" didn't give any independent lines.

I'd be slightly cautious about playing 5.Qc2 g6 as Black (intending ...Bf5), as White could gain time kicking the bishop with f3 & g4 (or e4). Andrew Martin gives 5.Qc2 g6 6.Bf4 Bf5 7.Qd2 Nf6 8.f3 as promising for White. It's similar to the line 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bf4 c6 6.Qc2 g6 7.e3 Bf5 8.Qd2 (& 9.f3) which turned out well in Karpov-Kasparov (1986), Kasparov-Short (1988), and Topalov-Karpov (1998). Maybe Black can improve though!
  
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MNb
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Re: 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3/Nf3 c6 4.cxd5!?
Reply #1 - 11/23/08 at 19:58:57
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Van der Werf and Van der Vorm give 5.Qc2 Bd6 ("g6 preparing ...Bf5 is an interesting alternative") 6.Nf3 Ne7 7.Bg5 Bg4 8.e3 Bg6 9.Bd3 Bg6 Bener-Lau, Oostende 1996 as "at least equal".
5.Bf4 Bf5 6.e3 Nf6 7.Bd3 Bxd3 8.Qxd3 Bd6 and 5.Nf3 Bf5 6.Bf4 Nf6 7.e3 Qb6 are equal as well.
These last two lines belong to the QGD Exchange Variation indeed, but are not quite the most promising ones for White.
  

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Paul Cumbers
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1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3/Nf3 c6 4.cxd5!?
11/23/08 at 16:34:16
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The QGD Exchange against the Triangle setup seems like a popular way for White to avoid the Noteboom and the Semi-Slav etc. But can Black take advantage of this particular move order, or is it best to allow transposition into normal QGD Exchange lines?

After 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6 4.cxd5 exd5, an Andrew Martin video recommends 5.Qc2 for White, claiming that Black can't avoid the usual stuff (that would typically arise via 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Nf6/Be7 4.cxd5 exd5). However, can't Black make use of the fact that he hasn't yet played ...Nf6 or ...Be7, and try something a bit more ambitious like 5...Bd6!?, say? This could be followed up with ...Ne7 and ...Bf5 (possibly ...f6 if White plays Bg5). The downside from Black's point of view is that both pairs of bishops might easily get exchanged, leaving a drawish position perhaps. Anyone know anything about this idea for Black and/or other ways of thwarting White's attempt at forcing a standard QGD Exchange?

Very similar are 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bf4 (or 5.Nf3 Bd6 6.Bg5 Ne7) 5..Bd6, or 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 c6 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bf4 (5.Bg5 Be7; 5.Qc2 Bd6 6.Bg5 Ne7) 5...Bd6.
  
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