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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide (Read 64514 times)
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #97 - 02/28/20 at 10:00:06
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BobbyDigital80 wrote on 02/27/20 at 21:32:10:
One other question. What does he recommend against 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6?

Nf3 (and Noteboom).
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #96 - 02/27/20 at 21:32:10
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One other question. What does he recommend against 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6?
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #95 - 02/26/20 at 11:47:26
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whatteaux wrote on 02/25/20 at 00:25:33:
BobbyDigital80 wrote on 02/24/20 at 08:21:40:
What line is recommended against 3...Be7?


4 cxd5 exd5 5 Bf4 c6 6 e3


Thanks!
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #94 - 02/25/20 at 00:25:33
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BobbyDigital80 wrote on 02/24/20 at 08:21:40:
What line is recommended against 3...Be7?


4 cxd5 exd5 5 Bf4 c6 6 e3
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #93 - 02/24/20 at 08:21:40
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What line is recommended against 3...Be7?
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #92 - 08/19/09 at 14:28:51
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Antillian wrote on 08/19/09 at 14:16:22:
Delchev preferered the simply 6. Bb2 as suggested by TricklyTimin in Delchev-Rasmussen, 2008 and scored a nice win.


I was just looking on the CA repertoire tree online. Once get to 7.Nbd2, there are several more games appearing. +40 if I remember correctly. The stats looked reasonable for White if you're into that sort of thing.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #91 - 08/19/09 at 14:16:22
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TicklyTim wrote on 08/19/09 at 09:37:25:
Markovich wrote on 08/18/09 at 19:16:46:
What do you have against 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e4 e6 5.b3 c5?


I think 6.Bb2 Nc6 7.Nbd2 takes things to a fairly common position. I don't have the book to hand, so not sure if this is covered.
Blacks main options are 7..Be7 or throwing in 7..cxd4. Maybe there is a transposition to the book somewhere around here - and maybe that's why it's not covered. (only guessing though).


I had not really looked at this. I suppose it would take a Tarrasch player to come up with a move like 5...c5  Cheesy

My initial thought was Black wastes a tempo moving the c-pawn again, but I can see the justification. I suppose your point is that White is not optimally placed to try to play it as a Tarrasch where ideally, White would prefer to have his bishops on g5 and e2.

I looked to see how the big boys have handled it and I found just 5 games in the Chessbase online database. I note that Barcot played 6. Be2 twice and lost both times. Delchev preferered the simply 6. Bb2 as suggested by TricklyTimin in Delchev-Rasmussen, 2008 and scored a nice win.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #90 - 08/19/09 at 09:37:25
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Markovich wrote on 08/18/09 at 19:16:46:
What do you have against 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e4 e6 5.b3 c5?


I think 6.Bb2 Nc6 7.Nbd2 takes things to a fairly common position. I don't have the book to hand, so not sure if this is covered.
Blacks main options are 7..Be7 or throwing in 7..cxd4. Maybe there is a transposition to the book somewhere around here - and maybe that's why it's not covered. (only guessing though).
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #89 - 08/18/09 at 19:27:37
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All Mark wants is an answer, and no one is giving it to him....  Grin
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #88 - 08/18/09 at 19:16:46
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Antillian wrote on 08/18/09 at 17:35:51:
TonyRo wrote on 08/18/09 at 16:10:14:
I'm probably not good enough positionally and technically to beat a master in the b3 Semi-Slav stuff, but my memory and tactical ability is good enough such that I could take him down in the Moscow or Botvinnik.


Actually, the 5. b3 Semi-Slav lines often lead to direct attacks on the black king. I won a nice correspondence game recently with a thematic knight post up on e5, bishop on d3, pawn on f4 and going for the black throat.

But I concede the other 4. e3 lines tend to be more technical. But if you enjoy having the bishop pair, there is a lot to like particularly in the 4...Bf5 lines.


What do you have against 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.e4 e6 5.b3 c5?
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #87 - 08/18/09 at 17:35:51
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TonyRo wrote on 08/18/09 at 16:10:14:
I'm probably not good enough positionally and technically to beat a master in the b3 Semi-Slav stuff, but my memory and tactical ability is good enough such that I could take him down in the Moscow or Botvinnik.


Actually, the 5. b3 Semi-Slav lines often lead to direct attacks on the black king. I won a nice correspondence game recently with a thematic knight post up on e5, bishop on d3, pawn on f4 and going for the black throat.

But I concede the other 4. e3 lines tend to be more technical. But if you enjoy having the bishop pair, there is a lot to like particularly in the 4...Bf5 lines.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #86 - 08/18/09 at 16:10:14
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I too thought Schandorff's book was quite good. I'd take it over Avrukh's book any day, just because the repertoire is a bit easier to digest in the format it's presented, and also because I find the recommendations more to my style and liking. I'm probably not good enough positionally and technically to beat a master in the b3 Semi-Slav stuff, but my memory and tactical ability is good enough such that I could take him down in the Moscow or Botvinnik.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #85 - 08/18/09 at 15:58:08
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moahunter wrote on 08/15/09 at 23:36:07:
^It is a matter of taste I guess. I like the QGD exchange -


I believe the QGD exchange confers upon White one of the more palpable advantages (+/=) in all of opening chess praxis.  A strong center and space advantage delivers highly actives pieces to White after ALL prophylactic measures have been executed.    I believe Schandorff has done yeoman's work with minimal space and details all the main plans for White to secure full advantage and play for the full point in this variation.

Supplement this section of the book with Middlegame Strategy: With the Carlsbad Pawn Structure by Robert Lenninger to develop a full understanding of the mix-and-match buffet that Black will use in attempt to detour White off the winning path.

  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #84 - 08/18/09 at 10:25:49
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moahunter wrote on 08/15/09 at 23:36:07:
^It is a matter of taste I guess. I like the QGD exchange - I think it is easy to play, builds a huge centre, and is a bit like a Nimzo Rubinestein, which fits in nicely as a compliment if you like to play like this.

Well I have played a lot through games with the exchange and still dont understand a thing about it. The black piece-jam on the k-side allows or disallows certain things and I never seem to be able to grasp it. I like the Rubinstein btw, but from the black side Wink
Apparently I am more at home with either completely plain positions with a clear plan or positions completely devoid of any logic Roll Eyes
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #83 - 08/15/09 at 23:36:07
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^It is a matter of taste I guess. I like the QGD exchange - I think it is easy to play, builds a huge centre, and is a bit like a Nimzo Rubinestein, which fits in nicely as a compliment if you like to play like this.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #82 - 07/23/09 at 19:37:28
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Smyslov_Fan wrote on 07/22/09 at 19:19:42:
I like the book as a supplement to and even a conversation with Avrukh's book.

Interestingly, they both recommend the same slightly unusual line against the Chigorin, but with different interpretations.  Avrukh's book is much more detailed, but a bit more staid.  I am disappointed that both authors steer away from the critical QGD lines.  Avrukh does this by recommending the Catalan while Schandorff recommends the Exchange Variation.

At least Schandorff does discuss the Slav and Semi-Slav in some detail.

If I had to choose one book, I would choose Avrukh's because of its greater depth.  But I am glad to have invested in Schandorff's book too.

Personally I like this one better than Avrukh's, in particular because of the repertoire chosen and the way he illustrates his lines with games and comments. I also dont really like his QGD line, but that has a lot to do with me not understanding that sort of middle game (for some reason I have less trouble with the semi-slav Undecided). It is a minor issue though, as black players (from 1200 to 2800 elo) seem to avoid it. One of the reasons being the line illustrated in the book, so yes imo it is a critical line (I dont think there is a more critical one theoretically speaking). Plus of course he does cover the Lasker and classical via another route.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #81 - 07/22/09 at 20:30:42
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Smyslov_Fan wrote on 07/22/09 at 19:19:42:
 I am disappointed that both authors steer away from the critical QGD lines.  Avrukh does this by recommending the Catalan while Schandorff recommends the Exchange Variation.

At least Schandorff does discuss the Slav and Semi-Slav in some detail


Well surely the Catalan as well as the exchange QGD are both critical. But I suppose you mean you would have liked to have seen 4. Bg5 QG or perhaps 5. Bf4. (Poor 1.e4 players, they have to play the Ruy Lopez, to gain an advantage, whereas 1.d4 players have a wife choice) I think a good  book on the Bf4 QG in particular would do well
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #80 - 07/22/09 at 19:19:42
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I like the book as a supplement to and even a conversation with Avrukh's book.

Interestingly, they both recommend the same slightly unusual line against the Chigorin, but with different interpretations.  Avrukh's book is much more detailed, but a bit more staid.  I am disappointed that both authors steer away from the critical QGD lines.  Avrukh does this by recommending the Catalan while Schandorff recommends the Exchange Variation.

At least Schandorff does discuss the Slav and Semi-Slav in some detail.

If I had to choose one book, I would choose Avrukh's because of its greater depth.  But I am glad to have invested in Schandorff's book too.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #79 - 07/21/09 at 20:04:04
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Back on topic - I just purchased this book. I have only worked through first chapter (QGD exchange). My impression - I love it. Very clearly written. It nicely shows the development of the line, then goes into key theory. Just what I need, and best of all, plays the lines I like (looking ahead at the Chapters).

What a beautiful book!
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #78 - 05/10/09 at 12:54:18
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Cyronik,

There have been similarly titled books aimed at the white player, for example: Shaw's Starting out the Queen's Gambit and Ward's Play the Queen's Gambit.  Most books from Black's perspective include the term "declined" or "accepted" in the title. If you would stop to think about it for a minute, it makes perfect sense as Aagard has already pointed out.   Don't accuse the publisher of being misleading because you yourself misunderstood. In any case, I would think any discerning buyer would not just buy because of a title, but would at least look at the blurb. The rest of your post has nothing to do with this thread - no need to load it up with every grouse you have about book titles.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #77 - 05/10/09 at 12:29:55
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I do not see how the title can be considered confusing. The book is called "Play the Queen's Gambit". Not Play the Queen's Gambit Declined, not Play the Queen's Gambit Accepted. A book called "Play the Benko Gambit" would be considered a book for Black, wouldn't it?
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #76 - 05/10/09 at 09:13:57
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Well, there is no King's Gambit variation from black's perspective.
But there are 2 variations from black's perspective, the QGD and QGA.
So you can't really compare the KG with the QG.

Of course bethanks to the information on the internet,
you can still find out what the book is really about.
But judging from the title you just don't know really what the book is about. I recently looked up which literature does exist for the QGD, and I had to check this book too, because I didn't know if it did handle it or not. If I see a book named "Play the king's indian", I know this is a book from black's perspective in the KID. If I see a book "beating the king's indian", I know this is a book handling the KID from white's perspective. Btw, looking up these books I find 2 other books, which descriptions are not really userfriendly, "Beat the KID" and "Kill K.I.D.",
these titles require you to know that KID = King's Indian Defence, not every chessplayer does know that, especially the ones whose mother's tongue is not english might have problems realizing these titles are about the kid. Do you think a normal chessplayer will find your books on the kid in amazon? I guess he will type "king's indian", I guess "beat the kid" and "kill k.i.d." might not show up.


Jacob Aagaard wrote on 05/09/09 at 15:32:48:
The Queen's Gambit is 2.c4 - this is the gambit move. For this reason the title is not misleading. Would Playing the King's Gambit not be clear?

I know a few people were confused, but with all the information out there, which is very very clear about what is in the book, I don't hope that anyone went as far as to buy the book and be disappointed.

  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #75 - 05/10/09 at 09:01:17
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Ah, ok, thanks markovich, I found my post there.
Good to know someone didn't delete it Smiley

Markovich wrote on 05/09/09 at 19:04:31:
Quote:
I think the title "Playing the Queen's Gambit" is misleading,
since it covers only certain variations from white's perspective.
A black player looking for a book about the Queen's Gambit (Declined/Accepted) might be fooled.

Btw, why was my comment about avrukhs repertoire deleted in the other thread?


A series of posts was moved to General Chess, "Chess Coaching."  It could be that your post was sent over there because it was interleaved with some non-topic ones.  There is no way to move single posts.

  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #74 - 05/09/09 at 19:04:31
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Quote:
I think the title "Playing the Queen's Gambit" is misleading,
since it covers only certain variations from white's perspective.
A black player looking for a book about the Queen's Gambit (Declined/Accepted) might be fooled.

Btw, why was my comment about avrukhs repertoire deleted in the other thread?


A series of posts was moved to General Chess, "Chess Coaching."  It could be that your post was sent over there because it was interleaved with some non-topic ones.  There is no way to move single posts.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #73 - 05/09/09 at 15:32:48
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The Queen's Gambit is 2.c4 - this is the gambit move. For this reason the title is not misleading. Would Playing the King's Gambit not be clear?

I know a few people were confused, but with all the information out there, which is very very clear about what is in the book, I don't hope that anyone went as far as to buy the book and be disappointed.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #72 - 05/09/09 at 07:55:18
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In reply to the post about the lines against the Indian defences.

4.Qc2 in the Nimzo Indian is already covered in Quality Chess' Challenging the Nimzo Indian by Vigorito. And that is a monster big book.

The Re1 Bayonet is covered in Quality Chess' Beat the KID by Markos.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #71 - 05/09/09 at 07:38:04
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I think the title "Playing the Queen's Gambit" is misleading,
since it covers only certain variations from white's perspective.
A black player looking for a book about the Queen's Gambit (Declined/Accepted) might be fooled.

Btw, why was my comment about avrukhs repertoire deleted in the other thread?
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #70 - 04/24/09 at 09:22:34
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Jacob Aagaard wrote on 04/16/09 at 07:33:04:
I think Palliser is doing something along these lines for Everyman. Anyway, it does not make a lot of sense for us to continue to cover everything times two, as we did with GM Rep 1 and PtQG. There are many openings and we will try to cover them one by one, instead of being the 1.d4 d5 and 1.e4 e5 company, which does seem to be the case at the moment!

I think black players will welcome this, seeing the great quality of the white repertoires in those books Wink
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #69 - 04/17/09 at 01:08:36
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I concur with bibs and Markovich on Cox's starting out book.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #68 - 04/16/09 at 07:33:04
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I think Palliser is doing something along these lines for Everyman. Anyway, it does not make a lot of sense for us to continue to cover everything times two, as we did with GM Rep 1 and PtQG. There are many openings and we will try to cover them one by one, instead of being the 1.d4 d5 and 1.e4 e5 company, which does seem to be the case at the moment!
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #67 - 04/15/09 at 20:58:43
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Cox's starting out book on the QG is indeed a nice one, more detailed than most Starting Out books.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #66 - 04/15/09 at 15:14:24
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Cox's text is a "starting out" in name, but a hardcore version. Very detailed - google a review.

Burgess/Pedersen - yes, an excellent work.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #65 - 04/15/09 at 14:54:21
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lnn2 wrote on 04/15/09 at 01:45:03:
wasn't there already cox's book?!
burgess/pedersen's beating the indian defences was a solid effort and well ahead of its time. i still use their recomendations for minor lines like budapest, englund gambit etc.

re Avurkh: i am looking forward to his improvement for the Avurkh-Kamsky benoni game!


Are you talking about a Starting Out book? I'm not so into those books.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #64 - 04/15/09 at 07:32:39
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Quote:
Well, there have been full volume 1 d4 repertoires and this immediately springs to mind:

http://www.amazon.com/Beating-Indian-Defences-Nimzo-Indian-Complexes/dp/07134780...

That and the companion 1d4 d5 volume would perhaps strike some terror into an author who attempted it these days.  Those two covered:

Main line QGD
Exchange QGD
3 e4 QGA
Meran Semi Slav with 7.g4
Botvinnik variation 5 Bg5 (although a sideline of that, not the full blown main lines)
Main line Slav 6 Ne5 (again a sideline in the absolute main line)
Noteboom
Misc 1 d5

Then this particular one:

4 Qc2 Nimzo
4 a3 Pantu21 + Bogo-Indian
7 Be3 exchange Grunfeld
Bayonet with 10 Re1 vs the KID
2 Nc3 Dutch
Benko 5 f3
Moden Benoni: MML
Pirc and Modern: 150 attack
misc stuff

Basically a full blown repertoire with both big branches of the semi-slav and both Pantu21 (with Nf3 QGD) and Nimzo (with exchange QGD) and more or less main lines everywhere....in 2 small, slim volumes of 180 ish pages  Shocked

I know I (and probably many others) learned to play 1 d4 with these two.



This must be interesting book!
What abaout 1.d4 e6 2.c4 f5?
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #63 - 04/15/09 at 01:45:03
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wasn't there already cox's book?!
burgess/pedersen's beating the indian defences was a solid effort and well ahead of its time. i still use their recomendations for minor lines like budapest, englund gambit etc.

re Avurkh: i am looking forward to his improvement for the Avurkh-Kamsky benoni game!
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #62 - 04/14/09 at 18:39:35
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I'll concede that maybe some slipped past my book radar, but only because they're more than a decade old. I'd imagine that book is almost useless nowadays.  Grin
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #61 - 04/14/09 at 17:18:09
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Well, there have been full volume 1 d4 repertoires and this immediately springs to mind:

http://www.amazon.com/Beating-Indian-Defences-Nimzo-Indian-Complexes/dp/07134780...

That and the companion 1d4 d5 volume would perhaps strike some terror into an author who attempted it these days.  Those two covered:

Main line QGD
Exchange QGD
3 e4 QGA
Meran Semi Slav with 7.g4
Botvinnik variation 5 Bg5 (although a sideline of that, not the full blown main lines)
Main line Slav 6 Ne5 (again a sideline in the absolute main line)
Noteboom
Misc 1 d5

Then this particular one:

4 Qc2 Nimzo
4 a3 QID + Bogo-Indian
7 Be3 exchange Grunfeld
Bayonet with 10 Re1 vs the KID
2 Nc3 Dutch
Benko 5 f3
Moden Benoni: MML
Pirc and Modern: 150 attack
misc stuff

Basically a full blown repertoire with both big branches of the semi-slav and both QID (with Nf3 QGD) and Nimzo (with exchange QGD) and more or less main lines everywhere....in 2 small, slim volumes of 180 ish pages  Shocked

I know I (and probably many others) learned to play 1 d4 with these two.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #60 - 04/14/09 at 14:57:21
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I actually wrote Aagaard awhile back about this same topic. No one has actually written a book solely on beating everything but 1...d5. There have been multiple books dedicated to everything after 1. d4 d5, included but certainly not limited to the two most recent Quality books, but no one has done, "Beat everything but 1...d5!" yet! Sure, Avrukh is coming out with his book soon, but playing g3 against everything won't fit everyone's style. If someone wrote a book on this covering aggressive, main line tries for White, it would sell like hot cakes. That said, it would probably be quite a bit more difficult to cover all of the Indian defenses, Dutch, etc...than it is to cover 1...d5. That's probably the main reason. That said, I still nominate a second Schandorff book. It would be spectacular.  Grin
  
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Re: A petition to Schandorff
Reply #59 - 04/14/09 at 13:41:22
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Eclectico wrote on 04/14/09 at 02:37:35:
You have written an amazing book, "Playing the Queen's Gambit".  On behalf of myself and others I have talked to, I hereby request you consider penning a companion volume to complete a white repertoire vs. the indian defenses.  

I particularly like the space gaining and controlled agression themes of your repertoire.  Perhaps you could continue on in that vein with the healthy dose of explanations and style that made your first book so good.

P.S.  The first book had such good explanations, that even a 1750 player could understand.  Please consider how desperately players in this range need thorough explanation of the ideas behind the more imbalanced indian defenses (nimzo, kid, benoni, dutch, etc).



I agree in 100% with this. I'm interested in another book by GM Schandorff, and another one and another......
  

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A petition to Schandorff
Reply #58 - 04/14/09 at 02:37:35
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You have written an amazing book, "Playing the Queen's Gambit".  On behalf of myself and others I have talked to, I hereby request you consider penning a companion volume to complete a white repertoire vs. the indian defenses.  

I particularly like the space gaining and controlled agression themes of your repertoire.  Perhaps you could continue on in that vein with the healthy dose of explanations and style that made your first book so good.

P.S.  The first book had such good explanations, that even a 1750 player could understand.  Please consider how desperately players in this range need thorough explanation of the ideas behind the more imbalanced indian defenses (nimzo, kid, benoni, dutch, etc).
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #57 - 04/09/09 at 10:34:20
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Willempie wrote on 04/09/09 at 09:05:36:
I am sure it has been written here somewhere, but I dont seem to be able to find it, so I'll just ask: Is there a companion volume planned for the non-1..d5 lines?


Jacob Aagaard wrote on 11/11/08 at 13:44:06:
Schandorff's book is ONE volume as White in the Queen's Gambit. Boris will finish off everything but 1...d5 in volume 2. Already the Budapest Gambit looks dead and burried Wink.

About the Tarrasch. There is 1-2 pages explaining the problems after 9.Bg5 c4.

  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #56 - 04/09/09 at 09:05:36
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I am sure it has been written here somewhere, but I dont seem to be able to find it, so I'll just ask: Is there a companion volume planned for the non-1..d5 lines?
  

If nothing else works, a total pig-headed unwillingness to look facts in the face will see us through.
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #55 - 04/07/09 at 06:40:25
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Markovich wrote on 03/20/09 at 12:08:34:
Templare2 wrote on 02/20/09 at 14:44:37:
In the QGD i never played the Exchange Variation so that book ca be a good start. But i risk to be move ordered. I.e.

1. d4 d5  2. c4 e6  3.Nc3 Ng6  4. cxd5 exd5  5. Bg5 c6  6. Qc2 Be7   7. e3 0-0  8. Bd3 Nbd7  9. Nge2 Re8  10. 0-0

Now Schandorf  considers only 10.., Nf8. But what about the simple 10.., Ne4?

Or:  1. d4 d5  2. c4 e6  3.Nc3 Ng6  4. cxd5 exd5  5. Bg5 c6  6. Qc2 Be7   7. e3 0-0  8. Bd3 h6  9. Bh4  Ne4  10. Bxe7 Qxe7

With this set-up we have a new the central tension, so what is the plan for White?


I can't answer this question without some research, but I have Schandorff's excellent book, and I think it's a bit of a mistake to look to it for absolutely all the answers.  A really complete repertoire book would be much larger than this.  He takes you most of the way, especially in the most critical lines, but you definitely have to do some work of your own, as here.

In another vein, I am not so sure about the enthusiasm for the Noteboom expressed above.  I haven't looked in any depth at the line given by Schandorff, but I don't think that Black's task is so very easy in the main lines of this system.



I took a look at it Friday Night at a club I go to where there's a book collection. I was disappointed that he chose to allow the Noteboom. Black scores well (including against the line he gives)and in addition it's practically and psychologically difficult to defend against those passed pawns.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #54 - 04/06/09 at 14:42:07
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TonyRo wrote on 04/06/09 at 14:18:41:
7. Bb5 Bc5 8. b4



UUUU HARDCORE!Cheesy
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #53 - 04/06/09 at 14:18:41
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7. Bb5 Bc5 8. b4
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #52 - 04/06/09 at 14:17:50
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I'm interested in this book. Can someone tell me, what L.Schandorff gives agains 1 d4 d4 2 c4 cd4 3 e4 e5 4 Nf3 ed4 5 Bc4 Nc6 6 0-0 Be6  ?
It's hard to get anything in this line.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #51 - 03/20/09 at 12:08:34
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Templare2 wrote on 02/20/09 at 14:44:37:
In the QGD i never played the Exchange Variation so that book ca be a good start. But i risk to be move ordered. I.e.

1. d4 d5  2. c4 e6  3.Nc3 Ng6  4. cxd5 exd5  5. Bg5 c6  6. Qc2 Be7   7. e3 0-0  8. Bd3 Nbd7  9. Nge2 Re8  10. 0-0

Now Schandorf  considers only 10.., Nf8. But what about the simple 10.., Ne4?

Or:  1. d4 d5  2. c4 e6  3.Nc3 Ng6  4. cxd5 exd5  5. Bg5 c6  6. Qc2 Be7   7. e3 0-0  8. Bd3 h6  9. Bh4  Ne4  10. Bxe7 Qxe7

With this set-up we have a new the central tension, so what is the plan for White?


I can't answer this question without some research, but I have Schandorff's excellent book, and I think it's a bit of a mistake to look to it for absolutely all the answers.  A really complete repertoire book would be much larger than this.  He takes you most of the way, especially in the most critical lines, but you definitely have to do some work of your own, as here.

In another vein, I am not so sure about the enthusiasm for the Noteboom expressed above.  I haven't looked in any depth at the line given by Schandorff, but I don't think that Black's task is so very easy in the main lines of this system.
  

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Noteboom is a weakness
Reply #50 - 03/20/09 at 07:04:02
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This is a very nice book.  The explanations are suitable for anyone from 1600 up.  It is a bit quirky the way he mixes "theory" sections with illustrated games.  But overall, it is very thorough, detailed and well written.

My only gripe with the book is a matter of taste.  I wish he had chosen the Bf4 variation against the QGD instead of the exchange.  He has played Blackburne QGD with reasonable results.  I would love to hear more from him on why he chose the exchange for the book.

His repertoire choice either forces you to allow the noteboom or play two different systems vs. the triangle system:  
1. d4 d5   2. c4 e6   3. Nc3 c6   4. e4 !?
1. d4 d5   2. c4 c6   3. Nf3 e6   4. Qc2 !?

If he had gone with the Bf4 QGD, white would not have to allow the noteboom or the nimzo-indian.  After 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 c6 4. Bg5, black probably has no better than to transpose into his Semi-slav repertoire.  And after 1. d4 Nf6  2. c4 e6  3. Nf3, white's play in the Petrosian QID might be more consistent with his repertoire theme of aiming for e4 than allowing the NID.

  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #49 - 03/07/09 at 16:52:20
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Is this book out?
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #48 - 03/07/09 at 00:47:54
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Schandorffs Noteboom coverage does not lead to an advantage. It is not his fault, because there is a reason why White often tries to avoid the Noteboom.

Schandorff ignores the Mainline with 8.axb5 (1591 games in my database, Scoring 48% for White) which tells a lot and opts for the rarely played 8.Rb1 (42 games, 54%). The game he follows is a CC game:

Elwert,Hans Marcus (GER) - Binder,Gerhard (GER) [D31]
Germany ch qgA13 corr BdF, 1993

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Sf3 c6 4.Sc3 dxc4 5.a4 Lb4 6.e3 b5 7.Ld2 a5 8.Tb1 La6 9.Se5 Dc7 10.Dg4 g6 11.Df3 Ta7 12.Se4 f5 13.Lxb4 axb4 14.Sc5 b3 15.Le2 Lc8 16.0–0 Se7 17.Tfc1 Dd6 18.Df4 Sd7 19.axb5 cxb5 20.Scxd7 Lxd7 21.Dh6 Lc6 22.Ta1 Dc7 23.Dg7 Tf8 24.Dxh7 Txa1 25.Txa1 Kd8 26.Dg7 Tg8 27.Df6 c3 28.Ta7 Lb7 29.Dxe6 1–0

There seem to beseveral different ways for black to get a good game, but theory is  to less developed to come to a real conclusion.

See as an example the line 8.Rb1 Bd7 advocated by Scherbakov on chesspub. Scherbakov and Schandorff both give
9.Ne5 Nf6

Schandorff then deals with 10.Qf3 and 10.Be2, claiming a small advantage for White, while Scherbakov analyses 10.g3 and 10.g4, both ignoring the alternative moves.

So there is a lot to explore in the 8.Rb1 line, but in my opinion no reason to be overoptimistic as White. I still prefer a repertoire avoiding the noteboom.

  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #47 - 02/22/09 at 04:54:34
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Thanks Tracke,

I was thinking perhaps he would use the 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 e6 4.Bg5 thingy aiming for a semi-slav.  So he does allow the noteboom!  How is the coverage of the noteboom?  I hear most repertoire books avoid it.  Just placed my order for the book... can't wait.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #46 - 02/21/09 at 15:33:15
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Eclectico wrote on 02/20/09 at 04:45:46:
What lines does he recommend vs. the Stonewall Dutch after 2...e6?
Is it consistent with the transposition from the slav move order after 2...c6? 
(...)


In Schandorff´s repertoire both move orders are consistent:
1d4 d5 2c4 e6 3Nc3 c6 4Nf3 f5 or 1d4 d5 2c4 c6 3Nf3 e6 4Nc3 f5 .
But he does not cover this in detail (just a short note about a Bf4 plan)
"because that´s basically outside the scope of this book".
That´s not 1d4 d5 but 1d4 f5 .

tracke  Smiley
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #45 - 02/21/09 at 15:22:44
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Doesn't Black lose a pawn in both these lines?

In your first line, after 10..Ne4, White can play 11.Bf4 when 11..f5 is met by 12.Nxd5!

In your second line, after 8..h6 9.Bh4 Ne4 10.Bxe7 Qxe7, White just takes on e4.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #44 - 02/20/09 at 14:44:37
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In the QGD i never played the Exchange Variation so that book ca be a good start. But i risk to be move ordered. I.e.

1. d4 d5  2. c4 e6  3.Nc3 Ng6  4. cxd5 exd5  5. Bg5 c6  6. Qc2 Be7   7. e3 0-0  8. Bd3 Nbd7  9. Nge2 Re8  10. 0-0

Now Schandorf  considers only 10.., Nf8. But what about the simple 10.., Ne4?

Or:  1. d4 d5  2. c4 e6  3.Nc3 Ng6  4. cxd5 exd5  5. Bg5 c6  6. Qc2 Be7   7. e3 0-0  8. Bd3 h6  9. Bh4  Ne4  10. Bxe7 Qxe7

With this set-up we have a new the central tension, so what is the plan for White?
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #43 - 02/20/09 at 07:40:46
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Eclectico wrote on 02/20/09 at 04:45:46:
What lines does he recommend vs. the Stonewall Dutch after 2...e6?  Is it consistent with the transposition from the slav move order after 2...c6?  

Does anyone have any experience with the Amazon vendor:  The_Book_Depository?  http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/1906552185/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&qid=123....


Eclectico - I use Book Depository here in the UK all the time; better than amazon, in fact, although that's where I first heard of them.  I buy directly from their website now, it's slightly cheaper tham Amazon, naturally.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #42 - 02/20/09 at 04:45:46
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What lines does he recommend vs. the Stonewall Dutch after 2...e6?  Is it consistent with the transposition from the slav move order after 2...c6? 

Does anyone have any experience with the Amazon vendor:  The_Book_Depository?  http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/1906552185/ref=dp_olp_new?ie=UTF8&qid=123....

  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #41 - 02/18/09 at 09:05:41
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The book can definitely be ordered on our site, shipping to all the world. Unfortunately it will not be available quickly in the bookstores in the US. Our coming books probably will be available quickly from Chess4Less, but not this one.

Jacob Aagaard
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #40 - 02/18/09 at 06:02:30
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TonyRo wrote on 02/17/09 at 16:08:20:
When can we expect to see this book in the States? Thanks!  Grin

Presumably you could already order it on the quality chess webpage?
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #39 - 02/18/09 at 00:03:54
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Markovich wrote on 02/17/09 at 22:21:04:
Give book now.  Want book.


I definitely agree.  Grin

On a related note, is there a plan for a similar, aggressive 1. d4 repertoire book against everything but 1...d5? Avrukh's isn't quite my style.  Sad
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #38 - 02/17/09 at 22:21:04
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Give book now.  Want book.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #37 - 02/17/09 at 19:50:21
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I find this part of the introduction quite interesting:

"Playing White is like serving in tennis. I remember when I started to play a few years ago – tennis that is! – a good friend of mine explained that the serve should be a great offensive weapon.
Actually this is quite a cruel thing to tell a beginner, because the serve is by far the most difficult stroke in tennis. But it is true of course, and the right attitude. With a good serve you either win directly or, if the opponent manages to return the ball, at least you get the chance to take the initiative and dictate the rest of the duel.
"
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #36 - 02/17/09 at 16:08:20
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When can we expect to see this book in the States? Thanks!  Grin
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #35 - 02/15/09 at 21:41:00
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Sounds like it is very brave, which is very rare for a repertoire book. (Can't recall any other in fact).
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #34 - 02/14/09 at 17:06:32
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Thanks for this, Tracke.  Very helpful.  Smiley
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #33 - 02/14/09 at 13:06:22
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Yesterday I got my copy from german distributor Niggemann and (as already used from Quality) I am very impressed by this book. - I should add (many forum members will know) that I´m mostly interested in these lines from Black´s point of view as I defend against d4 with various Slav systems (including Cambridge-Springs) and QGA, while I seldom use 1d4 on my own: only for Torre/London in bad moods or if I expect Black to defend with Chigorin, Tarrasch, Albin etc. So I didn´t carefully read the chapters about QGE and Moscow/Botvinnik in the Semi-Slav.

Schandorff writes very readable and it is a real joy to follow his honest and clearly arranged explanations. With his long grandmaster experience he carefully devides the important from the unimportant. You cannot say that he simplifies matters but chess seems to be so easy, you simple have to make the best (opening) moves!
His material is up-to-date, there are many games from Dresden 2008. And (with minor exceptions, see later for that) he uses all relevant databases and all topical books from Quality, Gambit, Everyman, NewInChess and Chess-Stars. Most cited games are from this third millenium (in fact many from the last two years) but Schandorff also uses some classical games from Botvinnik, Portisch, Yusupov, Karpov and Kasparov for introductional or even theoretical purposes. Remarkable is Schandorff´s research in (modern) correspondence chess, 14 of his 66 main games are corr games!
Regarding the form of coverage it´s definetly a “grandmaster guide” to a narrow white repertoire (only sometimes with alternative suggestions) but not a complete reference work for both sides. In that way maybe comparable to Markos´ Beat the KID (but I didn´t read that book carefully). And while the text contains many of Schandorff´s own games he do not proudly claim major theoretical novelties. Maybe understandable as he mainly deals with topical main-lines of the elite players and therefor Schandorff often restricts himself to find, choose and arrange the most important games and the most promising new ideas in an excellent way. - The material is presented in extensively commented main games (with chapter introductions before and conclusions afterwards), sometimes there are typical classical games before he delves into theory.
Looking at the recommended repertoire Schandorff has exclusively chosen sharp and space-grabbing main-lines, always on the cutting edge of opening theory, at least in the QGD, QGA, Slav and Semi-Slav lines. Against some minor lines there is not much space for stylistic choices, he sometimes repeats nearly the same lines to white advantage as shown by Khalifman or Avrukh. But while Schandorff challenges the Chigorin with 5.Lg5 like Avrukh did, he questions the Tarrasch (“unsound”) with the Rubinstein main-line 9Bg5 improving on Avrukh´s objections to 9Bg5 .

I looked at the variations only in an amateurish and superficial way and as I still believe 1…d5! to be the best answer to 1d4, I tried to find some mistakes or omissions to keep my own black repertoire going. This proved to be a very difficult task, so far I´ve not achieved much!
- But I noticed that Schandorff´s bibliography lists only the second edition (2005) of Sakaev/Semkov about QGA but not the topical third edition from 2008. And indeed, in some lines after 3e4 Nc6 or 3e4 Nf6 Black might find some signs of rescue against Schandorff´s suggestions (sorry, I don´t want to share my own analysis). Btw, also Rizzitano´s How to beat 1d4 from 2005 has been ignored but this doesn´t seem to be much important in the 3e4 e5 variation of QGA.
- In the Open Slav Schandorff examines nearly all black variations against white´s central approach, but for some unknown reasons he obviously forgot to mention the old 5a4 Bf5 6Ne5 Nbd7 7Nxc4 Qc7 8g3 e5 9dxe5 Nxe5 10Bf4 Rd8!? . Several Years in the 1970/80s this was the controversial main-line of the whole slav, and while it has vanished from elite play, it should still be labelled as playable (at least below elite level). White´s advantage is long-lasting but very small (and Schandorff covers many  black variations inferior to this one). - White players should be aware of the classical crush Torre-Timman 0-1 (Hamburg 1982, a wonderful mate combination!) or of the more recent encounters Gordon-Hector 0-1 (4NationsChallenge 2008) and Morchiashvili-Bregadze 0-1 (Georgien 2008; similiar to Torre-Timman the death comes on the white squares!). It´s always funny to present old main-lines to young players…
- Schandorff is best in black´s main systems, obviously he trusts in his readers abilities to cope with Black´s fourth or fifth choices. Some += variations aren´t covered at all, for example the “Bellon-Murey-Slav” 5.a4 a5?! as suggested in SOS 10.

This shouldn´t harm Schandorff´s efforts, he has definitely written a very good book. - The book can be used from 1700 on, but it´s surely a must buy for all 1d4-players 2000-2400, who are not completely satisfied with a catalan approach a la Avrukh or Khalifman/Kramnik. And, of course, all black players of those lines should get a copy, too. Be prepared, the air becomes thinner …

I would rate the book with at least 8 stars (out of 10).

tracke  Smiley
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #32 - 02/12/09 at 13:30:44
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Quote:
Given that he is suggesting the most critical lines, wouldn't the Marshall gambit be a better fit?


Possibly. But then he would need to offer another line for White after the move-order 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 e6.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #31 - 02/12/09 at 12:08:16
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tafl wrote on 02/12/09 at 08:03:28:
Quote:
What's gotten me curious for the last several weeks is think what he would include for 1d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6. I don't see mention of the marshall Gambit in the contents, but...is there another choice?


There is a chapter on the Triangle (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6) on page 231. Given that he recommends 3.Nc3 against the QGD and 3.Nf3 against the Slav, the natural choice seems to be 4.Nf3 (rather than Marshall's 4.e4), allowing the Noteboom.



Given that he is suggesting the most critical lines, wouldn't the Marshall gambit be a better fit?
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #30 - 02/12/09 at 12:06:58
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Dragan Glas wrote on 02/12/09 at 02:21:30:
Greetings,

Antillian wrote on 02/08/09 at 15:58:07:
Dragan Glas wrote on 02/06/09 at 19:27:56:
I wonder what suggestion can (could) be made against the relatively recent innovation for Black in the Exchange (to solve the problem with the queen's bishop)?

Nothing major, I'd imagine.

Kindest regards,

Dragan Glas


What innovation are you refering to?

Wasn't there a novelty in the Deangerous Weapons book on the QGD to solve Black's queen's bishop problem!?

I don't have that book, but I seem to recall a review - somewhere! - which mentioned a TN.

Kindest regards,

Dragan Glas


Okay, thanks, I have a copy. I will check it.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #29 - 02/12/09 at 08:09:29
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pauloschreiner wrote on 02/12/09 at 01:49:24:
http://www.schachversand.de/d/detail/buecher/10008.html

Small PDF sample available at the "Leseprobe PDF" link. Thought it might help.

Paulo


Thanks, an appetite-whetting tidbit. Not much money for chessbooks this year but this seems a good candidate for my wellearned cash.  Wink
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #28 - 02/12/09 at 08:03:28
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Quote:
What's gotten me curious for the last several weeks is think what he would include for 1d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6. I don't see mention of the marshall Gambit in the contents, but...is there another choice?


There is a chapter on the Triangle (1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6) on page 231. Given that he recommends 3.Nc3 against the QGD and 3.Nf3 against the Slav, the natural choice seems to be 4.Nf3 (rather than Marshall's 4.e4), allowing the Noteboom.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #27 - 02/12/09 at 02:21:30
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Greetings,

Antillian wrote on 02/08/09 at 15:58:07:
Dragan Glas wrote on 02/06/09 at 19:27:56:
I wonder what suggestion can (could) be made against the relatively recent innovation for Black in the Exchange (to solve the problem with the queen's bishop)?

Nothing major, I'd imagine.

Kindest regards,

Dragan Glas


What innovation are you refering to?

Wasn't there a novelty in the Deangerous Weapons book on the QGD to solve Black's queen's bishop problem!?

I don't have that book, but I seem to recall a review - somewhere! - which mentioned a TN.

Kindest regards,

Dragan Glas
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #26 - 02/12/09 at 01:49:24
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http://www.schachversand.de/d/detail/buecher/10008.html

Small PDF sample available at the "Leseprobe PDF" link. Thought it might help.

Paulo
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #25 - 02/11/09 at 23:18:45
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Thanks for posting. Interesting. What's gotten me curious for the last several weeks is think what he would include for 1d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6. I don't see mention of the marshall Gambit in the contents, but...is there another choice?
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #24 - 02/11/09 at 18:28:52
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From Nigemann website:

003 Preface

006 Key to symbols used & Bibliography

007 Introduction

0111 Queen's Gambit Declined

013 Follow the Patriarch

016 The 3...Be7 move order

021 The mainline

028 3...Be7

0392 Queen's Gambit Accepted

041 The 3...b5 Variation

043 The 3...c5 Variation

048 The 3...e5 Variation

060 The 3...c6 Variation

064 The 3...Nf6 Variation

0713 The Slav

073 The Rare 3...dxc4

076 The 5...Na6 Variation

077 The 5...Bg4 Variation

081 The 5...e6 Variation

084 The Mainline: 5...Bf5 6.Ne5

086 The 6...Na6 Variation

088 The Mainline - Part One:

088 The Bishop Sacrifice - 15...0-0-0

090 The Bishop Sacrifice - 15...0-0

093 The Bishop Sacrifice - 15...b5 etc.

095 Kramnik's ending

097 The Mainline - Part Two

099 The Classical Move - 11.. .f6

102 Morozevich's 11...g5

105 Sokolov's Variation - 7...Nb6

1114 The Semi-Slav

112 The Botvinnik Variation

113 The Moscow Variation

114 The Cambridge Springs

114 Queen's Gambit Declined

114 Theory: Botvinnik Variation

133 Theory: Moscow Gambit

147 Theory: Cambridge Springs

158 Theory: QGD

1635 The a6-Slav

165 The 5...b6 Variation

166 The 5...Bg4 Variation

169 The 5...g6 Variation

171 The 5...Bf5 Variation

175 The 5...Nbd7 Variation

1816 The Tarrasch

182 Positional Play

187 Theory

191 The 9...c4 Variation

194 The 9...Be6 Variation

197 The 9...cxd4 Variation

2057 The Chigorin

206 The System

210 The a6-variation

212 The active 4...Bg4

214 Early Deviations

2198 Minor Lines

220 The Albin Counter-Gambit

223 The Von Hennig-Schara Gambit

226 The 2...Bf5 Variation

229 The Symmetrical 2...c5

231 The Triangle Variation

236 The Semi-Tarrasch

238 The QGD with 3...Bb4

241 Index of Full Games

243 Index of Variations
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #23 - 02/08/09 at 15:58:07
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Dragan Glas wrote on 02/06/09 at 19:27:56:
I wonder what suggestion can (could) be made against the relatively recent innovation for Black in the Exchange (to solve the problem with the queen's bishop)?

Nothing major, I'd imagine.

Kindest regards,

Dragan Glas


What innovation are you refering to?
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #22 - 02/06/09 at 19:27:56
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Greetings,

Antillian wrote on 01/30/09 at 12:30:54:
ghenghisclown wrote on 01/08/09 at 22:23:07:
Where did we get the impression, myself included, that Schandorff would cover the Bf4 QGD?


I believe this was just speculation on this board. In the Avrukh thread,  someone mentioned that Schandorff favoured Bf4 lines in the QG OTB, and the perception probably grew from that.

I am not surprised at the decision to focus on the exchange instead. Afterall, repertoire books always take shortcuts. Not that the exchange is by any means inferior to the Bf4 lines, but it certainly would take a lot more space for a Bf4 repertoire.

It is really not difficult for a decent chess player to put together a White repertoire on the exchange variation. There is so much material out there already, and I wonder if this book can add that much. Someone who wants to play Bf4 as White from scratch, however has to do a lot more work.

I wonder what suggestion can (could) be made against the relatively recent innovation for Black in the Exchange (to solve the problem with the queen's bishop)?

Nothing major, I'd imagine.

Kindest regards,

Dragan Glas
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #21 - 02/06/09 at 15:01:27
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According to the Website:

5Bg5 against the Semi-Slav

6Ne5 versus the 5...Bf5 main line Slav

3.e4 against the Queen’s Gambit Accepted

The Exchange Variation versus the Queen’s Gambit Declined

5.c5 against the 4...a6-Slav

Wow!

Nice to see a book advocating all the critical lines, even if I don't opt for them myself. "Get in on board and be prepared to fight" IM John Cox would be well pleased.  Grin

  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #20 - 02/06/09 at 14:43:32
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http://www.qualitychess.co.uk/products/1/41/playing_the_queens_gambit/

"At our Warehouse on the 11th of February."

So we should see this soon  Smiley I wonder if Qualitychess will provide a pdf with TOC and some sample pages as they did other times, I find extremely useful, give a taste of the book.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #19 - 01/30/09 at 13:08:53
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HgMan wrote on 01/30/09 at 11:59:45:
Eclectico wrote on 01/30/09 at 11:55:05:
Any updates on the material this will cover or a release date?  


Ummm....

See above and see above...


Thanks for the insightfull response.  Huh

Aagaard mentinoed a tenative 4 week release date.  He mentioned Shaw was editor, but we haven't heard more from Shaw.  It doesn't seem unlikely that someone might know more now than 3 weeks ago.  Nor, does it seem implausable that bumping this thread might inspire Shaw to post for the sake of free publicity  Wink
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #18 - 01/30/09 at 12:30:54
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ghenghisclown wrote on 01/08/09 at 22:23:07:
Where did we get the impression, myself included, that Schandorff would cover the Bf4 QGD?


I believe this was just speculation on this board. In the Avrukh thread,  someone mentioned that Schandorff favoured Bf4 lines in the QG OTB, and the perception probably grew from that.

I am not surprised at the decision to focus on the exchange instead. Afterall, repertoire books always take shortcuts. Not that the exchange is by any means inferior to the Bf4 lines, but it certainly would take a lot more space for a Bf4 repertoire.

It is really not difficult for a decent chess player to put together a White repertoire on the exchange variation. There is so much material out there already, and I wonder if this book can add that much. Someone who wants to play Bf4 as White from scratch, however has to do a lot more work.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #17 - 01/30/09 at 11:59:45
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Eclectico wrote on 01/30/09 at 11:55:05:
Any updates on the material this will cover or a release date?  


Ummm....

See above and see above...
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #16 - 01/30/09 at 11:55:05
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Any updates on the material this will cover or a release date?
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #15 - 01/09/09 at 09:54:30
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To me the Queen's Gambit is 2.c4 - this is the gambit move. I am sorry if the title has tricked anyone, it was not intentional.

John is the exclusive editor on this book, so he will give the more in depth answers on this one.

I hope the book will be out in four weeks, but this is far from a promise.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #14 - 01/08/09 at 22:23:07
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Where did we get the impression, myself included, that Schandorff would cover the Bf4 QGD?
  

"Experience is a dim lamp, which only lights the one who bears it."
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #13 - 01/08/09 at 12:57:35
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rossia wrote on 01/08/09 at 12:18:47:
Now I'm disappointed. Firstly d4-players get GM repertoire in 2 volumes, and by this book they get even more power.

I was hoping that it would be Black repertoire in QGD, cause we don't have good book for Black on the market.

And what is going on for us e4-die-hards? Mr. Aagaard wrote that in 2010 we can expect GM repertoire 1e4, and this is sooooooooooo long!


Perhaps you need to commission a GM to write your own personalized repertoire.  Roll Eyes

  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #12 - 01/08/09 at 12:35:54
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rossia wrote on 01/08/09 at 12:18:47:
John Shaw wrote on 01/08/09 at 11:21:09:
Just to clear up any possible confusion: this book is a repertoire for White after 1.d4 d5 2.c4.


Now I'm disappointed. Firstly d4-players get GM repertoire in 2 volumes, and by this book they get even more power.

I was hoping that it would be Black repertoire in QGD, cause we don't have good book for Black on the market.

And what is going on for us e4-die-hards? Mr. Aagaard wrote that in 2010 we can expect GM repertoire 1e4, and this is sooooooooooo long!



Hmmm, if there's not one already maybe we could start a thread in the "General Chess" section of books we'd like to see written.  Maybe if enough people agreed on a subject it would influence the right people.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #11 - 01/08/09 at 12:18:47
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John Shaw wrote on 01/08/09 at 11:21:09:
Just to clear up any possible confusion: this book is a repertoire for White after 1.d4 d5 2.c4.


Now I'm disappointed. Firstly d4-players get GM repertoire in 2 volumes, and by this book they get even more power.

I was hoping that it would be Black repertoire in QGD, cause we don't have good book for Black on the market.

And what is going on for us e4-die-hards? Mr. Aagaard wrote that in 2010 we can expect GM repertoire 1e4, and this is sooooooooooo long!
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #10 - 01/08/09 at 11:21:09
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Just to clear up any possible confusion: this book is a repertoire for White after 1.d4 d5 2.c4.

The repertoire chosen by Lars Schandorff is based on main lines that take space in the centre as soon as possible. So:

3.e4 against the QGA
Exchange Variation vs. the QGD
6.Ne5 against the 5...Bf5 Slav
5.Bg5 against the Semi-Slav
5.c5 against the a6-Slav
...and so on.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #9 - 01/08/09 at 06:06:20
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I'm looking forward to this book more than Greet QID book and Vigorito's Slav book put together. Should be very informative.
  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #8 - 01/07/09 at 20:55:06
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TN wrote on 01/07/09 at 19:51:12:
Against the Open Slav, I think Lars recommends 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5.

Also, against the QGD, I recall Aagaard saying that Lars would focus on the 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Nbd7/Be7 5.Bf4 variation.



That should make a number of people here at the forum happy.  I know it would be nice to see updated material on the Bf4 variation.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #7 - 01/07/09 at 19:51:12
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Against the Open Slav, I think Lars recommends 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dc4 5.a4 Bf5 6.Ne5.

Also, against the QGD, I recall Aagaard saying that Lars would focus on the 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 Nbd7/Be7 5.Bf4 variation.

  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #6 - 01/07/09 at 19:45:23
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rossia wrote on 01/07/09 at 19:22:55:
Mr. Aagaard, this book will create repertoire for BLACK or for WHITE?

I guess for Black because the book title suggests so.


If it were for a Black repertoire wouldn't it read something like, Playing the Queen's Gambit Declined instead of just Playing the Queen's Gambit which includes more variations?
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #5 - 01/07/09 at 19:22:55
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Mr. Aagaard, this book will create repertoire for BLACK or for WHITE?

I guess for Black because the book title suggests so.
  
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #4 - 01/07/09 at 19:05:22
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drkodos wrote on 01/07/09 at 18:52:43:
What I find find amusing though, is the idea that real GM's would need a "repertoire" book in order to create their repertoires. 

I suspect they do not.

To make use of it, yes.  To rely upon it?    Huh

Me?  I'm just a fish so I need all the help I can get.


I suspect the most ambitious repertoire books particularly from Chess Stars and Quality Chess are useful even for GMs, but what do I know...

Isn't it also a truism that nobody should rely on lines from a repertoire book without checking them thoroughly for themselves? With that in mind, I'll leave the forum now and be back in 5 years when I've analyzed all the lines in the new Avrukh book  Grin

Of course, the most obvious use of a repertoire book for a GM is getting paid to write it Wink
« Last Edit: 01/07/09 at 20:27:57 by Stigma »  

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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #3 - 01/07/09 at 18:52:43
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kylemeister wrote on 01/07/09 at 17:46:08:
It is certainly possible to combine the QGD and Semi-Slav as Black.  

It's kind of amusing, though, all the salivating that seems to be occasioned by every new repertoire book that comes down the pike ...



Pathos is the word I choose here instead of amusing, but that's just me.  I guess I would have to alter it to "pathetic" to really fit the sentence structure properly, though.


What I find find amusing though, is the idea that real GM's would need a "repertoire" book in order to create their repertoires.  

I suspect they do not.

To make use of it, yes.  To rely upon it?    Huh

Me?  I'm just a fish so I need all the help I can get.
  

I know I've made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission.
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kylemeister
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #2 - 01/07/09 at 17:46:08
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It is certainly possible to combine the QGD and Semi-Slav as Black. 

It's kind of amusing, though, all the salivating that seems to be occasioned by every new repertoire book that comes down the pike ...
  
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Stigma
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Re: Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
Reply #1 - 01/07/09 at 17:08:50
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From what I undestand Schandorff will cover a WHITE repertoire with the Queen's Gambit. Avrukh mentions in his introduction that Schandorff will cover 3.e4 versus the QGA (therefore Avrukh chose 3.e3!? instead and was very happy with the lines he ended up with).

The QGA 3.e4 fits well with the QGD Exchange, so maybe the repertoire will be similar to Ward's "Play the Queen's Gambit" but more detailed. Anyway, check Schandorff's white games with 1.d4 d5 2.c4!
  

Improvement begins at the edge of your comfort zone. -Jonathan Rowson
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rossia
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Playing the Queen's Gambit: A Grandmaster Guide
01/07/09 at 16:58:42
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I saw on amazon.com an announcement for new QUALITY CHESS book written by Denmark GM Lars Schandorff (Elo 2505) about QGD:

# Paperback: 256 pages
# Publisher: Quality Chess (May 2009)
# Language: English

Does anyone know which lines will it cover?

For me is more importantly to ask if this proposed repertoire can be complemented with Vigorito's "Play the Semi-Slav" which I play?

I hope that's possible and even recommendable to combine QGD and Semi-Slav.  Cool

What do you think guys? Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

***************************************


PS Here are the games played by our author, taken from Chessbase Mega 2008:

(400550) Arlandi,Ennio (2300) - Schandorff,Lars (2355) [D37]
EU-ch U20 Groningen (12), 1983
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bf4 0–0 6.e3 b6 7.cxd5 exd5 8.Bd3 Bb7 9.0–0 c5 10.dxc5 bxc5 11.Ne5 Nbd7 12.Re1 a6 13.Rc1 Nxe5 14.Bxe5 Re8 15.Na4 c4 16.Be2 Bb4 17.Bc3 Bd6 18.Bf3 Ne4 19.Bxe4 Rxe4 20.Bd4 Qh4 21.h3 Rae8 22.Nc3 R4e6 23.Qg4 Qxg4 24.hxg4 Bc6 25.Red1 Rb8 26.Rd2 Bb4 27.f3 f6 28.Kf2 a5 29.a3 Bxc3 30.Bxc3 a4 31.Rh1 ½–½

(427017) Fedder,Steen (2420) - Schandorff,Lars (2310) [E05]
Politiken Cup 06th Copenhagen (6), 1984
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.g3 Be7 5.Bg2 0–0 6.0–0 dxc4 7.Qc2 a6 8.Qxc4 b5 9.Qc2 Bb7 10.Rd1 Be4 11.Qb3 Nc6 12.Bg5 Bd5 13.Qe3 Nb4 14.Bxf6 gxf6 15.Qd2 Bxa2 16.Nc3 Bd5 17.Nxd5 Nxd5 18.e4 Nb4 19.d5 Re8 20.Rac1 Rc8 21.Bh3 Bd6 22.Qh6 c5 23.dxe6 fxe6 24.e5 Bf8 25.Bxe6+ Rxe6 26.Rxd8 Rxd8 27.Qh3 Rde8 28.Rd1 fxe5 29.Ng5 R6e7 30.Ne4 Bg7 31.Rd7 c4 32.Rxe7 Rxe7 33.Qc8+ Kf7 34.Nd6+ Kg6 35.Qg4+ 1–0

(428979) Gheorghiu,Florin (2505) - Schandorff,Lars (2275) [D58]
Berliner Sommer 02nd Berlin West (1), 1984
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Bg5 Be7 5.Nc3 h6 6.Bh4 0–0 7.e3 b6 8.Bd3 Bb7 9.0–0 Nbd7 10.Qe2 c5 11.Rfd1 Ne4 12.Bg3 Nxg3 13.hxg3 cxd4 14.Nxd4 a6 15.cxd5 exd5 16.Bf5 g6 17.Bxd7 Qxd7 18.Qf3 Rfd8 19.Rd3 Qc7 20.Rad1 Rac8 21.Nce2 Qe5 22.Qf4 Qg7 23.Nc3 b5 24.a3 Bd6 25.Qf3 Be5 26.Nce2 Rc4 27.b4 Qf8 28.Nb3 Ba8 29.Ned4 Rdc8 30.Nc5 Qd6 31.Qg4 Rd8 32.Qe2 Qb6 33.Ndb3 Re8 34.Nd7 Qd6 35.Nxe5 Qxe5 36.Rd4 Rec8 37.Nc5 a5 38.Qd2 Bc6 39.Nb3 axb4 40.axb4 Ra8 41.Na5 Rxd4 42.exd4 Qd6 43.Qxh6 Bd7 44.Qd2 Re8 45.Nb7 Qe7 46.Nc5 Bg4 47.f3 Bf5 48.Kf2 g5 49.g4 Bg6 50.Re1 Qxe1+ 51.Qxe1 Rxe1 52.Kxe1 Kh7 53.Nd7 1–0

(1153818) Berg,Klaus (2420) - Schandorff,Lars (2450) [D31]
DEN-ch Ringsted (5), 1995
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6 4.e4 Bb4 5.exd5 exd5 6.cxd5 Qxd5 7.Nf3 Nf6 8.Bd3 0–0 9.0–0 Qa5 10.Qc2 h6 11.Re1 Be6 12.Re5 Qd8 13.Bf5 Bxf5 14.Rxf5 Nbd7 15.Qb3 Qe7 16.Ne5 Qe6 17.Qxe6 fxe6 18.Rf3 Nxe5 19.dxe5 Nd7 20.Rxf8+ Rxf8 21.Be3 Nxe5 22.Bxa7 Nc4 23.Ne4 Nxb2 24.Rb1 Rd8 25.Kf1 Nd3 26.a3 Ra8 27.axb4 Rxa7 28.b5 cxb5 29.Rxb5 Nf4 30.f3 Ra1+ 31.Kf2 Ra2+ 32.Kg3 g5 33.Nxg5 Ne2+ 34.Kg4 hxg5 35.Rxb7 Ra5 36.g3 Rf5 37.Re7 Re5 38.Kh5 Kf8 39.Ra7 Nd4 40.Kg6 Rf5 41.f4 gxf4 42.g4 Rd5 43.Rf7+ Ke8 44.Rxf4 e5 45.Re4 Ke7 46.h4 Rd6+ 47.Kh7 Kf6 48.Re1 Nf3 49.Re4 Re6 50.g5+ Kf5 51.Ra4 Nxh4 52.Rxh4 Kxg5 0–1

(1244661) Lyrberg,Patrik (2415) - Schandorff,Lars (2450) [D43]
Politiken Cup 17th Copenhagen (6), 1995
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bxf6 Qxf6 7.e3 Nd7 8.Bd3 dxc4 9.Bxc4 g6 10.0–0 Bg7 11.Rc1 Qe7 12.e4 e5 13.d5 Nb6 14.dxc6 bxc6 15.Be2 0–0 16.Qc2 Rb8 17.Nd1 Be6 18.Ne3 f5 19.b3 Kh7 20.Bd3 f4 21.Nf5 gxf5 22.exf5 Bxf5 23.Bxf5+ Kh8 24.Be4 Rbc8 25.Qc5 Qe6 26.Rfe1 Rc7 27.Bb1 Re8 28.Re2 Bf6 29.Qc2 Rg8 30.Qf5 Qxf5 31.Bxf5 Re8 32.Nd4 Nd5 33.Kf1 Rg8 34.Nf3 Re8 35.Be4 Rd8 36.Rd2 Rdd7 37.Rdc2 Ne7 38.Ke2 Kg7 39.Rc5 Nd5 40.Bxd5 1–0

(1595379) Bekker Jensen,Simon (2305) - Schandorff,Lars (2505) [D43]
Politiken Cup 19th Copenhagen (7), 12.07.1997
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c6 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bxf6 Qxf6 7.e3 Nd7 8.a3 g6 9.cxd5 exd5 10.Bd3 Bd6 11.0–0 Qd8 12.Qc2 Nf6 13.Ne5 Bxe5 14.dxe5 Ng4 15.Bxg6 Qg5 16.Bxf7+ Kxf7 17.h3 Qxe5 18.hxg4 Bxg4 19.Qb3 b6 20.e4 Rhg8 21.f4 Qd4+ 22.Kh2 Qd2 23.Nb1 Qe2 24.Nc3 Qxg2+ 25.Kxg2 Bd1+ 26.Kf2 Bxb3 27.exd5 cxd5 28.Nb5 Rg4 29.Nd4 Bc4 30.Kf3 Rag8 31.Nf5 Kf6 32.Nxh6 Rg3+ 33.Kf2 Rg2+ 34.Ke3 0–1

(2341611) Nielsen,Peter Heine (2585) - Schandorff,Lars (2511) [D37]
DEN-ch Nyborg (6), 12.04.2001
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0–0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.a3 Nc6 9.Qc2 Qa5 10.Nd2 Be7 11.Bg3 Bd7 12.Be2 Rfc8 13.0–0 Qd8 14.cxd5 exd5 15.Nf3 Be6 16.Rfd1 Nh5 17.Qb3 Na5 18.Qa2 Nxg3 19.hxg3 Bf6 20.Nd4 ½–½

(2341627) Pedersen,Steffen (2463) - Schandorff,Lars (2511) [D58]
DEN-ch Nyborg (9), 15.04.2001
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 0–0 7.e3 b6 8.Rc1 Bb7 9.Bxf6 Bxf6 10.cxd5 exd5 11.b4 c6 12.Bd3 Re8 ½–½

(2453052) Nilsson,Mattias (2253) - Schandorff,Lars (2551) [D35]
SWE-chT 0102 Sweden (1), 12.10.2001
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.cxd5 exd5 5.Bf4 Nf6 6.e3 Bf5 7.Bd3 Bxd3 8.Qxd3 c6 9.Nf3 Nbd7 10.0–0 0–0 11.h3 Re8 12.Rab1 a5 13.Ne5 Nxe5 14.Bxe5 Nd7 15.Bf4 Nb6 16.Qc2 Nc4 17.Rbc1 Bg5 18.b3 Nd6 19.Bxd6 Qxd6 20.Na4 Bd8 21.Nc5 Rb8 22.a3 h5 23.Qc3 Bc7 24.f4 Qe7 25.Rf3 Bd6 26.b4 axb4 27.axb4 Ra8 28.Rb1 Ra2 29.Nd3 Qf6 30.Rb2 Ra1+ 31.Kh2 Rea8 32.Qc2 R8a3 33.b5 g6 34.bxc6 bxc6 35.Rb6 Ra6 36.Rxa6 Rxa6 37.Ne5 Qe6 38.Qb1 c5 39.Rg3 h4 40.Rg4 Ra3 41.Nxg6 Rxe3 42.Nxh4+ Kh8 43.dxc5 Bxc5 44.Qa1+ f6 45.Qa8+ Kh7 46.Nf5 1–0

(2457487) Sokolov,Ivan (2658) - Schandorff,Lars (2551) [D37]
Jonsson mem op Reykjavik (5), 28.10.2001
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Qc2 Na6 6.a3 c5 7.e3 cxd4 8.exd4 dxc4 9.Bxc4 0–0 10.0–0 Nc7 11.Bg5 b6 12.Rad1 Bb7 13.Ne5 Ncd5 14.Rfe1 Rc8 15.Qb3 a6 16.Bxf6 Bxf6 17.Bxd5 exd5 18.Na4 Bxe5 19.Rxe5 Bc6 20.Nc3 f6 21.Re3 Rf7 22.Rde1 Rb8 23.Re6 Qd7 24.h3 g6 25.Qb4 Kg7 26.a4 Rb7 27.Rd6 a5 28.Qa3 Qc8 29.Ree6 Bd7 30.Re3 Bc6 31.Ne2 Rfd7 32.Nf4 Kf7 33.Ree6 Rxd6 34.Qxd6 Bxa4 35.Rxf6+ Kg8 36.Qxd5+ Kg7 37.Qe5 Kg8 38.Nxg6 Qc1+ 39.Kh2 hxg6 40.Rxg6+ Kf8 41.Qh8+ Ke7 42.Qh7+ Kd8 43.Qxb7 1–0

(3618096) Boensch,Uwe (2524) - Schandorff,Lars (2534) [E08]
Bundesliga 0607 Germany (2.7), 29.10.2006
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.g3 Bb4+ 5.Bd2 Be7 6.Bg2 0–0 7.0–0 c6 8.Qc2 Nbd7 9.Rd1 b6 10.Bf4 Bb7 11.Ne5 Rc8 12.Nc3 Nh5 13.Be3 Nhf6 14.h3 b5 15.Nxd7 Nxd7 16.c5 a5 17.f4 f5 ½–½


  
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