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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) moving to Linux (Read 24752 times)
thibdb13
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #13 - 03/16/10 at 07:04:36
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TalJechin wrote on 03/15/10 at 19:52:27:
I'm also considering Ubuntu - if there is a free 64 bit version then why spend dough on Windows 7?!

What linux programs for chess should I install if the only purpose is to use it for analysis?

Is Scid the best for that or is there an alternative? How about setting up engine matches, shoot-outs and similar - is that possible in the Linux chess world too?

Is it easy to install engines in linux? One thing I didn't like with Linux last time I tried it, is that you don't get to choose to which folder you want to download stuff - so how do you find the files when installing?

Is there an easy to use compilator in the ubuntu basic installation? I've got the impression that many engines don't come compilated for ubuntu.

I don't know whether scid is the best or not but I am quite happy with it in combination with the fruit engine.

Easy to install? It depends on your knwoledge of Linux. I am using ArchLinux x86_64 (http://www.archlinux.org/) and I had no problem installing scid (http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?O=0&K=scid&do_Search=Go) and fruit (http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?O=0&K=fruit&do_Search=Go) from the AUR  repository.
  

Yusupov once said that “The problem with the Dutch Defence is that later in many positions the best move would be ...f5-f7” but he is surely wrong.
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BlkSabb
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #12 - 03/16/10 at 00:22:35
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You might want to download winetools.  It lets you automatically download and install some of the Windows components that are required for Chessbase to run properly like Windows Media Player and DirectX.  Playchess is working for me.  So are videos.  The problem is that it crashes a lot so save your work regularly.
  
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TalJechin
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #11 - 03/15/10 at 23:56:53
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Thanks a lot Vladimir, I'll take a stab at installing wubi and scid etc, tomorrow morning! :)
  
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Vladimir
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #10 - 03/15/10 at 23:29:39
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Hi again, TalJechin.

One thing I tell people thinking about experimenting with Linux is that there's no reason not to try it because experimenting with it is so easy.

Check out Wubi. It lets you install a partition of Ubuntu under Windows as if it were any other program, and uninstalls like any other program as well. It automatically sets up the boot manager for a dual boot without your having to hassle with partitioning your hard drive, which is easy but potentially confusing for people that just want to try it out.

One great feature is that if your processor is 64-bit but you only have a 32-bit version of Windows, the Ubuntu you install will support 64-bit anyway.

There are a couple of limitations, of course. First, unless they've fixed it recently, you won't be able to set your computer to hibernate. Also, the partition of Ubuntu resides as a very large file in your Windows file system, meaning that Ubuntu will slow down as your Windows file system becomes very fragmented. If you notice any slowdowns, just run the defrag under Windows and you should probably be good to go. Small price to pay for the convenience, however. If you want to completely migrate to Ubuntu, or even a standard dual-boot setup, the transition is easy. Just remember to always back up your files.

As for chess programs, the ones mentioned in this thread are a good start. I haven't tried any of the Chessbase products under Wine, but Scid is excellent in my experience.

Engine matches require a small amount of fiddling. They aren't as push-button as under Fritz. You'll want to look into the recently updated XBoard which may not have made it into the repositories, I haven't checked. It supports many new features for chess engines and matches. If you're really serious, there's another program called Cutechess which you run from the command line. It supports super-fast time controls for engines, such as game in 10 seconds with a 0.1 second increment. These games are useful for chess engine programmers, as they get reliable results of their engine changes very quickly. This may not interest you, of course, but I'll throw it out there.

Installing engines didn't seem any more or less difficult for me than under Windows. The folder hierarchy is easy to understand. For example, you have a /home folder for all of your personal stuff, while all of the system files are elsewhere. Download a file to your desktop, extract it to /home/Chess/Engines, for example, compile it if need be, and then install it under Scid.

Compiling most programs isn't very difficult once you get the hang of it. It's usually just a two or three step process from the command line, ("./configure", "make", "sudo make install", voila). The GNU C compiler, gcc, already comes with every installation. However, if I recall correctly, the C++ compiler called g++ does not come by default. Downloading it from the repository is simple, though. Usually the makefiles supplied with any source code you compile will boil everything down for you to the three commands above. Compiling chess engines is usually just one command, though ("make"). The engine will compile from the source code, and you'll have an executable just sitting there in the folder ready to be installed into Scid. Just be sure to read the "readme" files if there are any special concerns or instructions.

That's all I can think of at the moment, but I hope it was helpful. The Ubuntu community is also wonderfully helpful to newcomers. Usually you can just Google your question and find out that someone has asked it and answered it already.
  
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TalJechin
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #9 - 03/15/10 at 19:52:27
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I'm also considering Ubuntu - if there is a free 64 bit version then why spend dough on Windows 7?!

What linux programs for chess should I install if the only purpose is to use it for analysis?

Is Scid the best for that or is there an alternative? How about setting up engine matches, shoot-outs and similar - is that possible in the Linux chess world too?

Is it easy to install engines in linux? One thing I didn't like with Linux last time I tried it, is that you don't get to choose to which folder you want to download stuff - so how do you find the files when installing?

Is there an easy to use compilator in the ubuntu basic installation? I've got the impression that many engines don't come compilated for ubuntu.
  
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Markovich
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #8 - 01/06/10 at 14:04:49
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msiipola wrote on 01/06/10 at 08:14:51:
Markovich wrote on 01/05/10 at 19:15:13:
VMWare is not free. 


See FAQ in: http://www.vmware.com/products/player/faqs.html

What does it cost?
VMware Player is free for personal non-commercial use. VMware Player is only distributable with written permission from VMware. Please apply here to request a distribution agreement.


But, the VMware Playes of course does not include any Windows software, but if you have an old Windows installation disk, which you bought before, you can install it in the player.

I have also used a dual boot configuration before, but it's very inflexible, if you want to use both Linux and Windows frequently.

With the VMware player I can now use most of the Windows programs, except 3D-software.


Well I know that VMWare Player is free, but it surprises me that you're using it, since I had the impression that you already had to have a virtual machine in order to use Player.  How did you create your virtual machine in the first place?  But we learn something every day, so I don't doubt you.

In any case, VirtualBox is not only free, but it installs automatically using Ubuntu's Synaptic package manager.  Once you get it installed, you have to install certain VirtualBox utilities on the guest machine, not the host, to allow easy cursor/mouse transitions between the host and the guest, and some other conveniences.

@battleangel: Maybe it's because I'm an old Unix hand and an Emacs user, but I could care less about fancy buttons and shiny, sculpted task bars.  In fact, I shun them.  What I do care about is that software perform its fundamental purposes well, and Scid does that. 
  

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battleangel
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #7 - 01/06/10 at 11:23:57
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but the userinterface of scid looks like ...
  
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msiipola
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #6 - 01/06/10 at 08:14:51
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Markovich wrote on 01/05/10 at 19:15:13:
VMWare is not free. 


See FAQ in: http://www.vmware.com/products/player/faqs.html

What does it cost?
VMware Player is free for personal non-commercial use. VMware Player is only distributable with written permission from VMware. Please apply here to request a distribution agreement.


But, the VMware Playes of course does not include any Windows software, but if you have an old Windows installation disk, which you bought before, you can install it in the player.

I have also used a dual boot configuration before, but it's very inflexible, if you want to use both Linux and Windows frequently.

With the VMware player I can now use most of the Windows programs, except 3D-software.
« Last Edit: 01/06/10 at 10:57:14 by msiipola »  
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Markovich
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #5 - 01/05/10 at 19:15:13
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VMWare is not free.  VirtualBox is free, and is available via your Ubuntu package manager.  You need a pretty capable machine to use this effectively, however.

There is another discussion of scid somewhere below.

I am fairly sure there are Linux clients for playchess.  Google, ask around.  Can't xboard be configured for it?
  

The Great Oz has spoken!
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zoo
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #4 - 01/05/10 at 17:39:58
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Scid, then. I thought it was no longer maintained, can it browse the standard bigbases and does it provide player or opening report, the most useful features for my needs?
As for VMware, I heard that :
1. it is not free ;
2. one needs to buy Windows as well to run it under VM.
is it true? if so, i'm not enough of a purist to have Linux run Windows for me, but this is no chess. If Chessbase products don't work under Linux, what I miss more is the Playchess client, does anybody know a workaround? 

Edit : Scid homepage tells that development has resumed (latest downloadable archive : jan-2010!). The product features PGN import/export and player/opening report, so everything should be fine (hope performance will be acceptable). I'll try it on Windows while I still have it!
As for the Playchess client it is another story, since fritzserver.org acknowledges no linux support as of end 2008. Any help welcome here!
  
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #3 - 01/05/10 at 17:09:55
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I don't know if your software will work, but I have tried several softwares with Wine, and I'm rather disappointed. For example I installed Chessbase 9, but when I clicked on any of the menu items, the program crashed. And I wasn't able to install the Chessmaster 11, only one of the older versions (version 6).

A much better solution then Wine, is to install a virtual Windows in your Linux. I'm using the VMware Player in a openSuse 11.1 installation, and it works very good. It's like a "real" Windows, but in a own window. The only drawback it have, it doesn't work with programs which use 3D-hardware acceleration.
  
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Markovich
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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #2 - 01/05/10 at 16:56:34
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I can't answer, though I run Linux (Ubuntu 64 bit).  The reason is that I run a virtual Windows XP machine using VirtualBox.  You might check that out.  It's vastly more convenient than a dual boot.  However, you need a powerful machine if the performance of the guest OS is not to suffer.

If you use Shredder, which is a mighty good engine, and Scid, which is a good chess data base, you can avoid Windows altogether.  Personally I run DeepShredder12 and Scid.  I have CA and Bookup running on the virtual machine, but the only one I really use is Bookup.  Frankly I like Scid better than CA, which is bloatware. 

Oh also, the Hot New Thing, Robolitto, runs on Linux.

Ah, I see now that you said "No Scid."  Well, to each his own.
  

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Hi Chesspublishing!

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Re: moving to Linux
Reply #1 - 01/05/10 at 16:35:48
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Chessbase Light and Fritz (12) have both not worked for me.

I dual boot Windows and Linux due to chess software.
  
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zoo
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moving to Linux
01/05/10 at 14:34:19
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Hello,
I'm moving to Linux (Ubuntu 32 bits) for non-chess reasons but would like to keep running some of the fine Windows chess software, eg. through Wine. Could Linux users please tell if the following run properly :
- chess engine : Rybka (said to be ok with wine) or Stockfish (open source, hence compilable).
- chess interface : Aquarium, or Fritz
- chess database : Chessbase or CA (no Scid, thanks)
- online client : Playchess client (or any other connecting to playchess).
Thanks in advance four your replies or suggestions.
  
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